From: dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com
Sent: Saturday, December 02, 2000 2:03 AM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 316

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There are 17 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: water pump pulleys
From: Darryl Tinnerstet <darryl_at_dml_techline.com>

2. Re: Re: Fuses
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com

3. Fuse box covers
From: deloreanernst_at_dml_aol.com

4. Re: Fuse block (was Fuses)
From: "John Hervey" <dherv10_at_dml_aol.com>

5. Re: Fuse block (was Fuses)
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>

6. Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain
From: "jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net " <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

7. Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain
From: "John Hervey" <dherv10_at_dml_aol.com>

8. Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>

9. DMCJOE
From: hrlyrngr1_at_dml_aol.com

10. Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain
From: "Grimsrud, Knut S" <knut.s.grimsrud_at_dml_intel.com>

11. Re: Fuse block (was Fuses)
From: "Jim Reeve" <ultra_at_dml_isd.net>

12. Re: Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>

13. DoorLock-wiring
From: Jan van de Wouw <Jan_at_dml_vdWouw.Demon.nl>

14. Re: Fuse Box replacement
From: Dee Moats <Dee-Moats_at_dml_excite.com>

15. Cleaning your car
From: Jan van de Wouw <Jan_at_dml_vdWouw.Demon.nl>

16. Condesating Quarter-windows
From: Jan van de Wouw <Jan_at_dml_vdWouw.Demon.nl>

17. Re: Fuse block (was Fuses)
From: "John Hervey" <dherv10_at_dml_aol.com>





Message: 1
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 21:33:59 -0700
From: Darryl Tinnerstet <darryl_at_dml_techline.com>
Subject: Re: water pump pulleys

Walt - I've been selling custom billet bolt-on water pump pulleys for close
to 14 years.  They are extremely well made and look great.  They go for $79
plus shipping but unfortunately I am sold out right now.  The shop that
makes them for me is way behind and it will probably be January before I get
another supply.  The reason I had them made was twofold - in the beginning a
lot of people were buying stock pumps and then ruining their pulley when
trying to switch it, and new pulleys were not available.  Plus, the Volvo
version of the pump is considerably less expensive and easier to find.  They
run around $79 - $135 depending on your resources, compared to the $463.75
cost of the original.  Nowdays there are options from other dealers, but I
still sell a lot of these pulleys.   Another advantage is the NEXT time your
pump goes south.  You just take your lifetime warranteed Volvo pump back to
the parts house, get a new one, and its a freebee.  I don't think the NOS
pumps have that kind of guarantee.  Your choice.
 
-- 
Darryl Tinnerstet
Specialty Automotive
4 LaBelle Lane
McCleary, WA 98557
PH: 360-495-4640
FAX: 360-495-4680



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Message: 2
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 23:32:14 EST
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: Fuses

Walt, Your right, It sounds like I'm talking about the fuse block with all 
the fuses in it. What I was trying to talk about is the fuse block, or strap, 
or holders used to replace the fan fail module.Thats where I see 20+ amp 
fuses. If that get's to hot due to overload, and the fuse doesn't blow fast 
enough due to overating then there could be potential problems.  Sorry: not 
trying to mislead anyone. I have an eraser on my pencil also. I build and 
will be on the web site soon a plug in modification for the fan fail module. 
guess what, I call it ( The Fan Fail Fix ) Each leg to the fans is fused at 
15 amps to maximize the protection to the $259.00 fans. Fuses are cheap. I 
also use long terminals out the bottom to maximize the contact surface when 
pluged into the socket as DMCJOE is relating to by contacts being tight. 
Since most folks can't or won't take out the terminals to tighten them up, I 
use the long terminals to help compensate.  
Out of the Bussmann catalog: During normal conditions, an overcurrent 
protection device ( fuse or circut breaker) must carry the current without 
nuisance openings, However, when and overload or short circuit occurs the 
device must ( interrupt or blow ) the overcurrent and withstand the voltage 
across the device after arching.
They also say: In the Bussmann catalog, The circuit protection device is 
designed to handle this value under steady operating conditions and at 
ambient temp near 25degree c. It is recommended that circuit designers select 
device ratings above the normal circuit current to prevent nuisance trips or 
blown fuses.     
Since the cooling fans in the De Lorean are an electric motor ( inductive 
load ) and if the motors are in good condition, the 15Amp fuses in the fan 
fail mods offer max protection, will handle inrush current and won't restrict 
current flow to the motors.
If anyone would like the two page ( basic overcurrent technology ) out of the 
Bussmann catalog, I will be happy to fax it to you.  
DMCJOE is also correct in the #7 fuse. The fuel pump in the De Loreans is a ( 
inductive load motor ) which under stress or load conditions draws more 
current and will melt #7 without blowing. The FV is also some what of an 
inductive load device, so when you get both of them going. It's melt down 
time over a period of time. His recomendation of replacement is wonderfull.
Hey, Walt 
Call me.
John
      



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Message: 3
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 23:38:27 EST
From: deloreanernst_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Fuse box covers

In a message dated 11/30/00 11:16:51 AM Eastern Standard Time, 
dherv10_at_dml_aol.com writes:

<< I also leave the cover off the fuses in the De Lorean to help get rid of 
heat. >>

Me too... but I keep the cover in the electrical compartment.  It has the 
fuse legend identifying what fuse covers what.

Wayne
The New DeLorean Manuals project
vin 11174



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Message: 4
Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2000 05:15:54 -0000
From: "John Hervey" <dherv10_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: Fuse block (was Fuses)

Ben, I have assembled a replacement fuse block. You can see it on my 
web site www.specialTauto.com. It would be a full day of rewiring i'm 
sure, but in a fix it will work and look good also. It is also 
modular, so if a fuse melts again and disfigures this block, then you 
can buy another section and it's unplug and plug. Email me if your 
intrested and we can talk about it. I'm not for sure what the 
material temperture rating of the Pressac block in the cars now is 
but I think mine is the same. I will check with the manufacture to 
see.
John

    --- In dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com, "Ben Maxwell" <ben_at_dml_b...> wrote:
> In mine, the fuse block has melted in two places, where the fuses 
are 
> connected much like the fan fail fix...
> 
> I'd love to eventually clean that area up, and get a new block and 
> harness, but would hate to have it meltdown again-- is there an 
> alternative fuse box out there?
> 
> -ben
> 06976
> 
> 
> 
> --- In dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com, "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_a...> wrote:
> > Jim,
> > 
> > It's not the fuse itself that is the source of the heat so much 
as 
> it is the
> > poor connection to the fuse.  If you want to reduce your chances 
of 
> a
> > melt-down, use a heavier duty style of fuse & fuse holder with 
the 
> original
> > 20 amp rating.
> > 
> > The Delorean engineers thought they could get away with using a 
fuse 
> &
> > holder rated at 20 amps that was meant for a low duty cycle and 
> instead they
> > used it for a high or even continuous duty cycle situation (as in 
> the case
> > with the headlight high beams which causes another melted spot on 
> the fuse
> > block.)  Either you need to take apart and clean the contacts 
> periodically
> > and hope it doesn't melt down despite your efforts or else 
replace 
> it with a
> > reasonable design that does not require this sort of maintenance.
> > 
> > Walt    Tampa, FL




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Message: 5
Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2000 00:42:26 -0500
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Fuse block (was Fuses)

-ben,

Unfortunately the answer is no. We have been working on an alternative for
quite some time. As a matter of fact our research DeLorean was fitted with a
Buss glass fuse block over 12 years ago. We never installed this system in
any other DeLorean because of extensive modifications to the existing
electrical compartment.

Once again if you routinely maintain the fuses and fuse block you should
have no further problems with meltdown.

"We're here to help you"
Seasons Greetings!

DMC Help / De Lorean Services / <dmchelp_at_dml_att.net>
Web Site: <www.deloreanservices.com>

----- Original Message -----
From: Ben Maxwell <ben_at_dml_benmaxwell.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, November 29, 2000 8:20 PM
Subject: [DML] Fuse block (was Fuses)


> In mine, the fuse block has melted in two places, where the fuses are
> connected much like the fan fail fix...
>
> I'd love to eventually clean that area up, and get a new block and
> harness, but would hate to have it meltdown again-- is there an
> alternative fuse box out there?
>
> -ben
> 06976





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Message: 6
Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2000 05:25:13 -0000
From: "jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net " <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain

To properly check the source of the current drain put an ammeter on 
the battery positive connection and observe the total current draw. 
Now one at a time pull fuses. You will find that there is draw from 
more than 1 fuse but the major amount will be drawn by #12 the door 
and interior light circuit. Typically 10 m.a. is considered normal
for 
a car sitting, it will take a month to discharge a good fully charged 
battery. Normal on a Delorean is usually quite a bit more. The cause 
is the many diodes in circuit #12. It is true that a diode is like a 
"check valve" but it is a leaky one. Each one adds up to a large 
cumulative effect.They can also fail by getting more leaky not just 
open or shorted. If you are confident that you have a good 
battery(load test it) and that all of your electrical connections are 
good then the problem most likely is in circuit #12. If the battery
is 
more than 4-5 years old and it has spent it's life 1/2 in storage and 
1/2 being used it is probably not able to provide full capacity and a 
load test will show it. Also if there is a problem in the charging 
circuit and the battery is always undercharged it will shorten the 
life of the battery. Another source of this problem are the door 
switches. There is a rubber tip on them and with age or maybe it's no 
longer there the switch can make contact even with the doors closed. 
With the interior lights off you wouldn't see the door lights still 
on. The ultimate solution is to install a master switch with a bypass 
fused wire to the clock. Then at shows the doors can be left open and 
you don't have to worry about the battery. It is also a good theft 
deterrent if you get the one with a removable key.Most people 
unfamiliar with a Delorean would never find the battery let alone the 
master switch.If you have a measurable current in the door lock 
circuit there is a problem, it should not have a measurable draw.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757 and yes I have a master switch with clock bypass.




--- In dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com, "Grimsrud, Knut S" <knut.s.grimsrud_at_dml_i...> 
wrote:
> Because I have a daily driver DeLorean in addition to my new one 
that I'm
> restoring, my good DMC doesn't get out much during these rainy 
winter months
> (I'm in Oregon, so it gets pretty sloppy around here this time of 
year).
> I've been a little curious about the gradual battery discharge that 
our cars
> seem to be so susceptible to, so I did a little investgating last 
weekend.
> 
> It is well known that the console clock and radio consume a trickle 
of
> current. However, when pulling the radio fuse there is still a 
slight power
> drain (at least on my cars). In fact, after pulling all the fuses
my 
cars
> still have a power drain from the batter of around 11mA. This isn't 
very
> much, but is sufficient to slowly degrade a battery over time.
> 
> In trying to track down this power trickle, what I found was that 
the door
> lock module on my car draws the additional 11mA of current. I 
haven't
> disassembled or reverse-engineered the module yet to understand why 
it draws
> a trickle current, but it appears to do so. I'm not sure if the 
LockZilla
> similarly draws a trickle current as I only have stock door lock 
modules in
> my cars.
> 
> If you suffer from inexplicable battery drain for a car that's 
stored for
> periods, the door lock module appears to be one of the contributors 
to the
> problem. I still need to recheck my measurements this weekend, but 
it
> appears that removing the clock/radio fuse and unplugging the door 
lock
> module may be sufficient to avoid battery drain without the need for
> installation of battery cutoff switches, trickle chargers, etc.
> 
> 		Knut




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Message: 7
Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2000 04:46:00 -0000
From: "John Hervey" <dherv10_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain

Knut, If anyone has a bad door lock module or one I could look at 
that has been opened, I bet I could come up with a Fix. Down here in 
Texas I drive my car year round and don't notice things like that. 
This is where a good hot battery with lots of current capacity comes 
in. I have a clip on 12 volt fan I leave running in my car during hot 
days all day long and it doesn't drain the battery down.
John
11004,6935,6568
www.specialTauto.com


  --- In dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com, "Grimsrud, Knut S" 
<knut.s.grimsrud_at_dml_i...> wrote:
> Because I have a daily driver DeLorean in addition to my new one 
that I'm
> restoring, my good DMC doesn't get out much during these rainy 
winter months
> (I'm in Oregon, so it gets pretty sloppy around here this time of 
year).
> I've been a little curious about the gradual battery discharge that 
our cars
> seem to be so susceptible to, so I did a little investgating last 
weekend.
> 
> It is well known that the console clock and radio consume a trickle 
of
> current. However, when pulling the radio fuse there is still a 
slight power
> drain (at least on my cars). In fact, after pulling all the fuses 
my cars
> still have a power drain from the batter of around 11mA. This isn't 
very
> much, but is sufficient to slowly degrade a battery over time.
> 
> In trying to track down this power trickle, what I found was that 
the door
> lock module on my car draws the additional 11mA of current. I 
haven't
> disassembled or reverse-engineered the module yet to understand why 
it draws
> a trickle current, but it appears to do so. I'm not sure if the 
LockZilla
> similarly draws a trickle current as I only have stock door lock 
modules in
> my cars.
> 
> If you suffer from inexplicable battery drain for a car that's 
stored for
> periods, the door lock module appears to be one of the contributors 
to the
> problem. I still need to recheck my measurements this weekend, but 
it
> appears that removing the clock/radio fuse and unplugging the door 
lock
> module may be sufficient to avoid battery drain without the need for
> installation of battery cutoff switches, trickle chargers, etc.
> 
> 		Knut




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Message: 8
Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2000 00:57:51 -0500
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain

Knut,

That is the reason that I suggest that all factory installed lock modules be
permanently disconnected. It's this mysterious trickle voltage that will
cause the module to activate and lock the doors unpredictably which in turn
will overheat the lock solenoids eventually leading to their destruction.

As you may know this is the main source of occupants being unexpectedly
being locked inside their DeLorean's. (See my article at:
http://www.geocities.com/MotorCity/Flats/3755/doorlock.html )

The Lockzilla does not have this voltage leak problem.

"We're here to help you"
Seasons Greetings!

DMC Joe / De Lorean Services / <dmchelp_at_dml_att.net>
Web Site: <www.deloreanservices.com>

----- Original Message -----
From: Grimsrud, Knut S <knut.s.grimsrud_at_dml_intel.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, November 30, 2000 5:35 PM
Subject: [DML] Door lock module contributing to battery drain


>
> In trying to track down this power trickle, what I found was that the door
> lock module on my car draws the additional 11mA of current. I haven't
> disassembled or reverse-engineered the module yet to understand why it
draws
> a trickle current, but it appears to do so. I'm not sure if the LockZilla
> similarly draws a trickle current as I only have stock door lock modules
in
> my cars.
>
> If you suffer from inexplicable battery drain for a car that's stored for
> periods, the door lock module appears to be one of the contributors to the
> problem. I still need to recheck my measurements this weekend, but it
> appears that removing the clock/radio fuse and unplugging the door lock
> module may be sufficient to avoid battery drain without the need for
> installation of battery cutoff switches, trickle chargers, etc.
>
> Knut






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Message: 9
Date: Thu, 30 Nov 2000 20:12:37 EST
From: hrlyrngr1_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: DMCJOE

Just wondering what happened to the delorean services web site?



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Message: 10
Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2000 08:51:23 -0800
From: "Grimsrud, Knut S" <knut.s.grimsrud_at_dml_intel.com>
Subject: Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain

Dave Swingle pointed me to a great resource that includes the door lock
module wiring diagram (see
http://www.dmcnews.com/Techsection/doorlocks.htm). From this diagram it
appears that the leakage current I'm getting from my door lock modules is a
result of a leaky capacitor. I'm not sure if this is a leakage current
peculiar to a couple failed modules I just happen to have or if this leakage
through the caps is a common occurrence. If you have a mysterious current
drain of some 11mA that you cann't account for, you might disconnect your
door lock module to see if this is the culprit.

	Knut





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Message: 11
Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2000 19:04:01 -0000
From: "Jim Reeve" <ultra_at_dml_isd.net>
Subject: Re: Fuse block (was Fuses)

So let me get this strait now.  In order to keep my fuse block 
intact, (no damage to it now), I should replace the 10A fuse in my #7 
with a 20A, clean out the contacts on the #7 socket thouroughly, and 
periodicly inspect it for melting?  What about a VERY small dab of 
Dielectric grease on both pins for the fuse?  I would think this 
would help electrical contact and prevent corrosion, but I dont know 
if there would be any ill-effects by using it with a fuse.  You guys 
apparently know more about this than I do, any comments?

One more electical project I'm working on this winter is hardwiring 
the cooling fan circuit to go directly from +12, to the 40A breaker, 
then to two relays (one for each fan), and then to thier 
complimentary fan motor.  Is the 40A breaker going to be sufficient, 
or should I put some fuses in there for each fan while I'm at it?  I 
dont know if I was the source of spark for this big fuse thread, but 
almost every post so far I have found quite interesting.  Thanks for 
the help guys!

Jim Reeve
'81 DeLorean #6960 - Now without front end panels!
AIM - Ultra2169




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Message: 12
Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2000 13:01:07 -0500
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain

David is correct about fuse #12. Several years ago I developed a pre-wired
switch specifically to address this problem, click on the following link for
details:  http://store.yahoo.com/dsvstore/batsav.html

DMC Joe

"We're here to help you"
Seasons Greetings!

DMC Help / De Lorean Services / <dmchelp_at_dml_att.net>
Web Site: <www.deloreanservices.com>

----- Original Message -----
From: <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com>
Sent: Friday, December 01, 2000 12:25 AM
Subject: [DML] Re: Door lock module contributing to battery drain


Normal on a Delorean is usually quite a bit more. The cause
> is the many diodes in circuit #12. It is true that a diode is like a
> "check valve" but it is a leaky one. Each one adds up to a large
> cumulative effect.They can also fail by getting more leaky not just
> open or shorted. If you are confident that you have a good
> battery(load test it) and that all of your electrical connections are
> good then the problem most likely is in circuit #12. If the battery
> is
> more than 4-5 years old and it has spent it's life 1/2 in storage and
> 1/2 being used it is probably not able to provide full capacity and a
> load test will show it. Also if there is a problem in the charging
> circuit and the battery is always undercharged it will shorten the
> life of the battery. Another source of this problem are the door
> switches. There is a rubber tip on them and with age or maybe it's no
> longer there the switch can make contact even with the doors closed.
> With the interior lights off you wouldn't see the door lights still
> on. The ultimate solution is to install a master switch with a bypass
> fused wire to the clock. Then at shows the doors can be left open and
> you don't have to worry about the battery. It is also a good theft
> deterrent if you get the one with a removable key.Most people
> unfamiliar with a Delorean would never find the battery let alone the
> master switch.If you have a measurable current in the door lock
> circuit there is a problem, it should not have a measurable draw.
> David Teitelbaum
> vin 10757 and yes I have a master switch with clock bypass.
> To properly check the source of the current drain put an ammeter on
> the battery positive connection and observe the total current draw.
> Now one at a time pull fuses. You will find that there is draw from
> more than 1 fuse but the major amount will be drawn by #12 the door
> and interior light circuit. Typically 10 m.a. is considered normal
> for
> a car sitting, it will take a month to discharge a good fully charged
> battery.

David Teitelbaum





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Message: 13
Date: Sat, 02 Dec 2000 00:12:00 +0100
From: Jan van de Wouw <Jan_at_dml_vdWouw.Demon.nl>
Subject: DoorLock-wiring

With all this talk about the door-lock-module 
I thought I might drop in a question too:

The Lock-Module has a connector on it with 9 pins,
on the original module there are only 8 of them in use:
* 2 times 2 for the solenoids (pins 6, 7, 8 & 9)
* a ground (pin 5)
* +12V for the electronics (pin 4)
      (the thick red wire is only for the solenoids)
* a sense-wires for lock (pin 2)
* a sense-wire for unlock and the "Lock Doors"-light (pin 3)

Pin #1 is'n used or even wired on the module-side...
If I remember correctly there IS a (yellow(?)) wire connected 
to pin 1 of my LockZilla, I'm not sure if this is connected on 
the cars' wiring harness too, but I was wondering what this
wire could be for? 

Who can enlighten me?
thanks in advance,

JAN van de Wouw
Thinking Different...   Using a Mac...
Living the Dream...   Driving a DeLorean...

#05141 "Dagger" since Sept. 2000

check out the Delorean-Files at:
http://www.deloreanfiles.nl/
------------------------------



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Message: 14
Date: Fri, 1 Dec 2000 14:43:56 -0800 (PST)
From: Dee Moats <Dee-Moats_at_dml_excite.com>
Subject: Re: Fuse Box replacement

As you can see by the date, my inbox is very large.  Actually I saved this
because my D has at least three melted spots on the fuse board and this
looked like a good winter project and a way to keep the thread alive.

Dee Moats
Vin #4434

On Sat, 5 Aug 2000 11:59:13 -0400, dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com wrote:

The part number for the 18-circuit fuse box is part number 13ZX4007W and can
be ordered online at www.jcwhitney.com  It's currently $21.95 as of today.
  
Matthew
VIN #10365

----- Original Message -----
Well, after some research I found a 9X2 fuse box from J.C. Whitney for under
$20 US that will fit rather nicely near where the old one should have been.

What is the part # all I saw in the catalog is a 6 fuse block for 24.95?
#03PA7115W 

Ralph

  


Dee-Moats_at_dml_excite.com





_______________________________________________________
Tired of slow Internet? Get _at_dml_Home Broadband Internet
http://www.home.com/xinbox/signup.html




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Message: 15
Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2000 23:14:26 +0100
From: Jan van de Wouw <Jan_at_dml_vdWouw.Demon.nl>
Subject: Cleaning your car

Firts of all thanks to the 31 people that responded to my Poll.
I'm happy to see that I'm not the only one who has trouble cleaning the glass on
his (or her) DeLorean. The interior doesn't seem to give any trouble,
or maybe that's what isn't cleaned as often as the outside of the cars  ;-)

Anyway, here are the results of my poll.

POLL QUESTION: 
What part of the DeLorean do you find hardest to (keep) clean?
 
CHOICES AND RESULTS
- Stainless Steel panels, 4 votes, 12.50%  
- Plastic areas (around doors, engine-cover, louvers, trunk-area etc.), 2 votes,
6.25%  
- Engine-compartment, 9 votes, 28.12%  
- Wheels/rims/tyres, 9 votes, 28.12%  
- Glass-sections (especially the inside of the rear-quarter-windows), 8 votes,
25.00%  
- Leather/Vinyl interior-parts, 0 votes, 0.00%  
- Carpeting (mats, parcelshelf etc.), 0 votes, 0.00%  
- Headliners, 0 votes, 0.00%  

Thanks again,

JAN van de Wouw
Thinking Different...   Using a Mac...
Living the Dream...   Driving a DeLorean...

#05141 "Dagger" since Sept. 2000

check out the Delorean-Files at:
http://www.deloreanfiles.nl/
------------------------------



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Message: 16
Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2000 23:20:52 +0100
From: Jan van de Wouw <Jan_at_dml_vdWouw.Demon.nl>
Subject: Condesating Quarter-windows

After closing my poll I'm still left with one question:

Is there anyway to keep the glass in the rear-quarter-panels
from collecting condensation?
I need to know so, because I sometimes have to leave my car
outside and I live in a humid climate (thet's putting it mildly)

The windshield is easily wiped if neccesary, but in most cases
the defroster does the trick. (and getting my airco fixed
will surely help too I guess)

On the outside however, I keep wiping off water...
I allready tried RainEx (and similar), but this doesn't really 
work because of the heat coming from the engine. 
On the insides of the rear windows it is most annoying, 
since these are hard to reach.

Any real solution would be more than welcome,
hope to hear from you soon,

JAN van de Wouw
Thinking Different...   Using a Mac...
Living the Dream...   Driving a DeLorean...

#05141 "Dagger" since Sept. 2000

check out the Delorean-Files at:
http://www.deloreanfiles.nl/
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Message: 17
Date: Fri, 01 Dec 2000 23:54:50 -0000
From: "John Hervey" <dherv10_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: Fuse block (was Fuses)

Jim, Part of the problem with electrical connections is they get 
loose, if things are tight, then you will have less electrical 
resistance in the connection and they will work properly. Grease: I 
use all the time to cut down on arching. But, You can't beat a tight 
connection. What DMCJOE said about #7 is a over current situation 
which is best remedyed as he suggested. I will try to come up with a 
plug in FIX. Ever so often unplug and plug all the fuses back in, 
this will clean the contacts if time has built up any corrosion. 
As far the coolant fans: The motors are $259.00 ea. from some De 
Lorean dealers. I sell replacement exact bolt on fans for $159.00 ea. 
But the motors that come in the car are excellent and should last a 
long time. I have taken two apart so far and cleaned them, put in new 
brushes, greased and put back together and work great.I would never 
wire direct to the circuit breaker. It's responce time to a short is 
to long. I have a plug in (Fan Fail Fix) that is fused on each leg 
going to the motors for maxium protection. It should be on my site 
this weekend. It's worth it. 20 amp is what the book shows to be in 
#7 already.
John 
www.specialTauto.com

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_egroups.com, "Jim Reeve" <ultra_at_dml_i...> wrote:
> So let me get this strait now.  In order to keep my fuse block 
> intact, (no damage to it now), I should replace the 10A fuse in my 
#7 
> with a 20A, clean out the contacts on the #7 socket thouroughly, 
and 
> periodicly inspect it for melting?  What about a VERY small dab of 
> Dielectric grease on both pins for the fuse?  I would think this 
> would help electrical contact and prevent corrosion, but I dont 
know 
> if there would be any ill-effects by using it with a fuse.  You 
guys 
> apparently know more about this than I do, any comments?
> 
> One more electical project I'm working on this winter is hardwiring 
> the cooling fan circuit to go directly from +12, to the 40A 
breaker, 
> then to two relays (one for each fan), and then to thier 
> complimentary fan motor.  Is the 40A breaker going to be 
sufficient, 
> or should I put some fuses in there for each fan while I'm at it?  
I 
> dont know if I was the source of spark for this big fuse thread, 
but 
> almost every post so far I have found quite interesting.  Thanks 
for 
> the help guys!
> 
> Jim Reeve
> '81 DeLorean #6960 - Now without front end panels!
> AIM - Ultra2169




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