From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 577
Date: Friday, June 08, 2001 10:18 PM

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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Slave Cylinder
From: "Ryan Foster" <westiething_at_dml_hotmail.com>

2. Re: Re: Please help- My Delorean won't start...
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com

3. Re: Crappy acceleration...
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>

4. Re: Re: can't remove my fuel accumulator
From: njp548_at_dml_aol.com

5. Re: Jump starting (was computer governor (should I be concerned?))
From: "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

6. Re: transmission fluid changes (was computer governor (should I be concerned?))
From: "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

7. Re: Computer Governor fuse
From: "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

8. Resetting Lambda switch,
From: RJRavalli_at_dml_AOL.com

9. Re: Re: okay...what are the actual figures...
From: fjk143_at_dml_aol.com

10. Re: Jump starting (was computer governor (should I be concerned?))
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net

11. ATTN: ALL CINCINNATI DELOREAN OWNERS
From: P12C16_at_dml_aol.com

12. Re: galvanizing D frame?
From: hholtz467_at_dml_yahoo.com

13. Re: Resetting Lambda switch,
From: gus_at_dml_austin.rr.com

14. #7 fuse
From: scottymckenzie_at_dml_altavista.com

15. Re: Jump starting (was computer governor (should I be concerned?))
From: srubano_at_dml_optonline.com

16. Re: Resetting Lambda switch,
From: "David Swingle" <dswingle_at_dml_enteract.com>

17. Re: Jump starting
From: "David Swingle" <dswingle_at_dml_enteract.com>

18. Re: Jump starting
From: srubano_at_dml_optonline.com

19. : Re: A one off factory Delorean W/a SS frame (Was Delorean galvanized frames/
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com

20. Fuel Pump
From: "J Rowe" <rowejj_at_dml_netusa1.net>

21. Tucker Car Collection & Bowie British Car Day
From: senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com

22. Re: Crappy acceleration...
From: "B Benson" <delornut_at_dml_peoplepc.com>

23. Re: galvanizing D frame?
From: njp548_at_dml_aol.com

24. questions (was: convex side mirror update)
From: "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

25. Re: Tucker Car Collection & Bowie British Car Day
From: senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com





Message: 1
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 03:17:30
From: "Ryan Foster" <westiething_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: Slave Cylinder


I just did my Slave cylinder and your right it is a bugger. Installing took 
longer than removing. I did mine from under the car and blead it from the 
top. Hope I don't have to do it again for quite some time.
Ryan- vin.#16301

>From: paulheymeson_at_dml_thefreeinternet.co.uk
>Reply-To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
>To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
>Subject: [DML] Slave Cylinder
>Date: Thu, 07 Jun 2001 23:39:13 -0000
>
>Hello List,
>
>Today I got my replacement slave cylinder for my clutch.
>Got it from Dave Howarth in our doc club uk.




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Message: 2
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 00:18:18 EDT
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: Please help- My Delorean won't start...

Your Right, I don't want people to think they fail on a regular basic, but 
based on the symptoms, This could be happening. The 20 year old ignition coil 
will build up a high resistance, start to weaken and can very easy start to 
intermit because of the electrical make up of wires, heat and solder joints. 
Hot and cold. If there is 6000 cars on the road and one /month fails, is that 
low or high. I would say low. I replace the ignition coil at every 50,000 
miles on any car, due to potential problems. Yes, you may get some that could 
be a lifetime, but I just don't want to worry about it since it's a low 
dollar item and it will help the car run better. That's me. The impulse coil 
is the same way, I have one that failed in 11004, You can check resistance 
cold and there right on the money, but put a hair dryer over them for about 3 
to 5 minuets and they open up. Again, You won't fine these in stock normally 
anywhere, so for $29.00 or so, if I have access to the distributor, I would 
replace it and then not worry any more. As in any circuit, not just the De 
Lorean, Where wires,solder joints,relays,contacts are concerned, there is a 
reason to try to do preventive maintenance. Something a simple as pulling the 
fuses in and out a couple of times in the socket, You may find a weak contact 
and over time will heat up and cause the fuse or fuse block to melt. 
I could rattle about more things on the car, electrical to check. But above 
would be some of the more common.
John Hervey
www.specialTauto.com
I anyone wants me elaborate more on how the coils can fail. Please email me 
direct.  



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Message: 3
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 00:17:25 -0400
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Crappy acceleration...

You definitely have a problem. The auto trans DeLorean is almost as quick as the five speed. You have one of two problems.

1. Your fuel enrichment circuit is not functioning,
2, You have a defective computer governor (transmission is starting in 2nd instead of 1st)

DMC Joe

"We're here to help you"

DMC Help / De Lorean Services / <dmchelp_at_dml_att.net>
Web Site: <http://www.deloreanservices.com"> DeLorean services.com
DMC.tv is in your future .....
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Aaron King 
  To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Friday, June 08, 2001 2:38 AM
  Subject: [DML] Crappy acceleration...


  I have a stupid question.  Why is the DeLorean so slow?  I have an 81 
  automatic, and I don't expect it to be a race car or anything, but the 
  acceleration off the line is laughable.  Example: I put it and my 87 VW Golf 
  (~3000lbs with 90hp I4 and a 3 speed auto trans) on the line and my Golf 
  beat the DeLorean off the line and led by a car length for several seconds.  
  I see no reason for this.  They weigh just about the same, but the engine in 
  the Golf is way underpowered.  I was thinking it might be the gear ratio of 
  1st gear is better on the Golf for acceleration, but (unscientific 
  observation) they seem feel relatively the same.  Does anyone have any ideas 
  or maybe something I haven't thought of?

  Thanks,

  Aaron King
  Kirkland, WA
  vin#1217
  _________________________________________________________________



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 4
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 01:04:08 EDT
From: njp548_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: can't remove my fuel accumulator

In a message dated 6/7/01 11:15:07 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
orentha_at_dml_hotmail.com writes:

<< On a side note, the mechanic said that my car would be dangerous to 
 drive at highway speeds because the rear suspension system is 
 completely rusted out and he also said that it is going to probably 
 going to cost around $2G to get it fixed.  That's about $2G more than 
 I have...
  >>
Jim,

      What part on the rear suspension is rusted out?  Trailing arms? Coil 
springs?  Sections of the frame where the lower and/or upper links connect?  

Later,
Nick
1852
<A HREF="Http://members.aol.com/njp548">Http://members.aol.com/njp548</A>



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Message: 5
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 01:50:29 -0400
From: "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Jump starting (was computer governor (should I be concerned?))

Senator,

I think that the suggestion to only jump-start DeLoreans in extreme
emergencies is being too conservative.  As long as some basic guidelines are
followed, there should be no danger of voltage spikes damaging the computer
governor.  Here are my guidelines.  Y'all correct me if I'm wrong and add
anything that gives more insight.

1) Before trying to start the parasite car, it is useful to leave the host
car running with the jumper cables connected for a while.  (Then shut it off
before cranking!)  This is for two reasons:  First, this will help to charge
the dead battery.  Even with a partial charge, any current delivered by it
will help considerably toward getting the car started.  Long jumper cables
particularly with their weak electrical connections do not make good
conductors for the high current it takes to run a starter.  Second, having
the host car running will provide a higher and considerably more effective
charging voltage (typically 14 volts or more) than with the host car not
running (typically 12 volts, maybe less).

2) Never have the host car running while cranking the parasite car.  Despite
the little extra kick that this may provide, don't do it.  The reason for
this is because the parasite car's starter may put an excessive load on the
host car's alternator causing it to overheat, burn out diodes, and produce
spikes as the regulator deals with the excessive load.  Alternators are only
designed to produce enough current to charge the battery and run the rest of
the car.  They do not have a high enough capacity or a regulator that is
meant to handle the load of starting a car.

Another tip for jump-starting DeLoreans:  In order to get jumper cables to
make a good connection, it helps to bite into a soft metal such as like the
lead posts that are used on car batteries.  Now don't get me wrong -- it is
a bad idea to jumper directly at the battery because any sparks in the area
can ignite gasses (yadda yadda yadda)...  Instead of messing up the threads
on the brass bolt in the engine compartment, I suggest threading a lead
battery stud to it to provide a soft gripping place for when you need it.
The only disadvantage I see from this is that the black insulating cap won't
cover it any more.  Also providing a lead grounding post nearby would be a
good idea as well.  Soft lead always provides a superior gripping surface
for jumper cables than hard engine parts.

Walt    Tampa, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com <senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com>
<snip>
>    The Automatic DeLoreans are reliable...I have driven two daily. Granted
>there are issues that can arise from JUMP STARTING the car. Only jump start
>in extreme emergency. As a matter of fact, the current issue of DeLorean
>World magazine features an article on Jump Starting, with a special note on
>Automatic owners.
<snip>




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Message: 6
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 01:50:40 -0400
From: "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: transmission fluid changes (was computer governor (should I be concerned?))

Senator,

In a conversation with Rob Grady, I suggested that I should change the
automatic transmission fluid in my DeLorean every 30K miles.  Rob suggested
doing it every 20K miles to be on the safe side since he has seen moisture
(and consequently rust) form inside.  Comparing Rob's proactive interval
with yours of every 3K miles makes yours seem wastefully frequent.  IMHO,
(forgive me if this sounds condescending because I don't mean it to) if you
want to err on the side of too much maintenance AND do what is best for your
car AND get the most for your money then I suggest changing your
transmission fluid less often and putting those resources toward changing
your motor oil more frequently.  I say this because I have known of several
people who change their motor oil as frequently as every 1K miles yet change
the tranny fluid much, MUCH less often.  Can you give us more insight as to
why you put so much emphasis on transmission maintenance?

Walt    Tampa, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com <senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com>
<snip>
>PREVENTIVE MAINTENANCE;
>
>    Change the transmission filter, and pan gaskets.
>    When I change the oil & filter every 3,000 miles, I change the
>transmission fluid regardless.
<snip>




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Message: 7
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 01:50:49 -0400
From: "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Computer Governor fuse

As long as proper procedures are followed, (meaning don't have the host
car's engine running while you crank the parasite car) then you shouldn't
need to pull the tranny fuse in the first place.

Walt    Tampa, FL

-----Original Message-----
From: dmc12_at_dml_btinternet.com <dmc12_at_dml_btinternet.com>
<snip>
>I have heard of many people taking out the auto trany fuse if they
>are jumpstarting the car. Is it then OK to replace the fuse once the
>car has started? & is running?
<snip>




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Message: 8
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 05:41:14 EDT
From: RJRavalli_at_dml_AOL.com
Subject: Resetting Lambda switch,

Okay, I've already asked the dumb question about what the Lambda
light is for.  Can someone help me with resetting the Lambda switch
though?  I can't seem to find it on the part itself.  I know this
has been covered before so if you can just send me a private mail
if you wish.

Thank you for all the great help as always,

Richard



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Message: 9
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 09:13:33 EDT
From: fjk143_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: okay...what are the actual figures...

500 hp and 500 lb ft equal fun in the right car.  Ask any Viper, big block Cobra, big block Corvette or Porsche Twin Turbo or Turbo owner...sometimes cars that have been breathed on to reach those figures...and they will tell you it is fun.  Put that in a Corvair and you have death as is likely the case in a DeLorean as it was drawing board designed NOT to handle the stresses brought on by that kind of juice - broken welds, twisted frame and suspension members, failed trannys, broken prop shafts and half shafts, brake failure from high speed deacceleration, boiling brake fluid from repeated braking from high speeds, destroyed tires, sheared bolts, etc.  How do I know?  Been there, done that as a kid.  Accept your car for what it is and maybe get a little more power/torque/handling from tuning.  If you need the huge numbers, save your money and get a car designed for it.  Take care and be safe.

Fred
6894 - getting the Houston Stage One tuning treatment now
2001 996 Twin Turbo with tuning to 480 and 480 (have seen 177.5 (computers!) with 2000 RPM left




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Message: 10
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 13:46:54 -0000
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net
Subject: Re: Jump starting (was computer governor (should I be concerned?))

If you look at the procedures to jump start newer cars the news is 
DON'T. Most of the latest cars with all of the computers do not allow 
jump starting. The procedure is to either remove and recharge the 
battery or replace with a charged one. I won't go as far as saying 
that is what to do on the Delorean but the safest way to get it going 
with a dead battery is to (with the ignition off) hook up a battery 
pack to the stud in the engine compartment and then the engine 
(ground). The car should start right up without having a surge go 
through the car.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_a...> wrote:
> Senator,
> 
> I think that the suggestion to only jump-start DeLoreans in extreme
> emergencies is being too conservative.  As long as some basic 
guidelines are

> for jumper cables than hard engine parts.
> 
> Walt    Tampa, FL
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: senatorpack_at_dml_c... <senatorpack_at_dml_c...>
> <snip>
> >    The Automatic DeLoreans are reliable...I have driven two daily. 
Granted
> >there are issues that can arise from JUMP STARTING the car. Only 
jump start
> >in extreme emergency. As a matter of fact, the current issue of 
DeLorean
> >World magazine features an article on Jump Starting, with a special 
note on
> >Automatic owners.
> <snip>




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Message: 11
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 11:35:49 EDT
From: P12C16_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: ATTN: ALL CINCINNATI DELOREAN OWNERS

Hey List, 
For your information, a car show is being held every Wednesday this summer in 
front of the Petsmart next to the Kings Automall.  They have a really great 
show and there are many Corvettes and hot rods, and I think we should put 
some DeLoreans in there to make the show exciting!

Hope to see some of you there this summer!
Patrick  (Not living the dream yet....)



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Message: 12
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 15:59:47 -0000
From: hholtz467_at_dml_yahoo.com
Subject: Re: galvanizing D frame?

How tough would a Powder Coating be under normal driving conditions?  

I found a shop about 5 miles from my house that has the facilities to 
powder coat car frames.  I would suspect that it's strong enough 
because they specialize in car parts such as control arms and 
springs, along with powder coating motorcycle frames.  They claim 
they have hundereds of colors and textures to choose from.

You all think this is a good permanent way to beat frame rust?

MacG467




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Message: 13
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 16:39:18 -0000
From: gus_at_dml_austin.rr.com
Subject: Re: Resetting Lambda switch,

It's difficult to reset the lambda counter without removing it, but it
can be done.  There is a reset dial that is turned to bring the
counter back to zero, but it is flat with two small holes.

I reset mine by making an impression of the dial with clay, marking
the clay with ink, and pressing a small piece of plastic against the
clay; I used a plastic bottle cap.  The ink left two dots on cap,
forming a template.  I tapped two small brads into the dots and cut
them to about 1-2 mm high with a dremel.

This could then be used as a tool to turn the dial.  However, you must
watch the counter while you're doing it, so it helps to have a mirror
and be able to read upside-down and backwards while using long, skinny
fingers to turn a bottle cap a few degrees at a time.

Or, you could remove and replace.


Gus Schlachter
Austin, TX
4695


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., RJRavalli_at_dml_A... wrote:
> Okay, I've already asked the dumb question about what the Lambda
> light is for.  Can someone help me with resetting the Lambda switch
> though?  I can't seem to find it on the part itself.  I know this
> has been covered before so if you can just send me a private mail
> if you wish.
> 
> Thank you for all the great help as always,
> 
> Richard




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Message: 14
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 17:33:11 -0000
From: scottymckenzie_at_dml_altavista.com
Subject: #7 fuse

Why does this fuse go bad?






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Message: 15
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 16:35:03 -0000
From: srubano_at_dml_optonline.com
Subject: Re: Jump starting (was computer governor (should I be concerned?))

Jump-starting any car has its hazards. Any car with a computer is in 
danger of the same affects of jump-starting it as the Delorean. Did 
you know that vehicle manufactures advise you NOT to jump-start any 
car that is equipped with air bags? If not done right then you an 
inadvertently deploy the air bags as you are jump-starting the car. 
Care should be taken when jump-starting any car. As long as you 
follow the procedures Walt outlined PLUS the ones below, you will be 
fine:

1. On the "Host" car connect the positive cable first to the positive 
side of the battery then the negative cable to the negative side of 
the battery. 

2. On the car with the dead battery: Connect the positive cable to 
the positive side of the battery and connect the negative cable to 
the engine block or chassis (whichever will provide a good ground). 
The jumper posts on the Delorean in the engine compartment provide 
good connections. What I tend to do before connecting the Jumper 
cables to either car is this: I put one of the clamps onto the post 
(with all of the other clamps disconnected) and rock it back and 
forth a little. The teeth that are on the clamps will scrape away any 
oxidation and bite into the metal. Just be sure the other three 
clamps are not connected to anything.

By connecting the positive cable first THEN the negative cable, you 
eliminate/minimize any surge that is sent into the electrical system 
of BOTH cars. I have seen countless amount of times people installing 
new batteries into their car and connecting the ground first then the 
positive lead and then wonder why all of their bulbs all burnt out at 
the same time in their dash board or why their computer fried.

Steve

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_a...> wrote:
> Senator,
> 
> I think that the suggestion to only jump-start DeLoreans in extreme
> emergencies is being too conservative.  As long as some basic 
guidelines are
> followed, there should be no danger of voltage spikes damaging the 
computer
> governor.  Here are my guidelines.  Y'all correct me if I'm wrong 
and add
> anything that gives more insight.
> 
> 1) Before trying to start the parasite car, it is useful to leave 
the host
> car running with the jumper cables connected for a while.  (Then 
shut it off
> before cranking!)  This is for two reasons:  First, this will help 
to charge
> the dead battery.  Even with a partial charge, any current 
delivered by it
> will help considerably toward getting the car started.  Long jumper 
cables
> particularly with their weak electrical connections do not make good
> conductors for the high current it takes to run a starter.  Second, 
having
> the host car running will provide a higher and considerably more 
effective
> charging voltage (typically 14 volts or more) than with the host 
car not
> running (typically 12 volts, maybe less).
> 
> 2) Never have the host car running while cranking the parasite 
car.  Despite
> the little extra kick that this may provide, don't do it.  The 
reason for
> this is because the parasite car's starter may put an excessive 
load on the
> host car's alternator causing it to overheat, burn out diodes, and 
produce
> spikes as the regulator deals with the excessive load.  Alternators 
are only
> designed to produce enough current to charge the battery and run 
the rest of
> the car.  They do not have a high enough capacity or a regulator 
that is
> meant to handle the load of starting a car.
> 
> <SNIP>> 
> Walt    Tampa, FL
> 
> <SNIP>




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Message: 16
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 19:13:03 -0000
From: "David Swingle" <dswingle_at_dml_enteract.com>
Subject: Re: Resetting Lambda switch,

Don't you just love it when someone comes up with such an elegant 
solution to a problem you only have to solve every 30,000 miles 
(probably about every 10 years for must of us)! What a dedicated 
group! Gus - I'm impressed (maybe too easily)

Dave Swingle

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., gus_at_dml_a... wrote:
> It's difficult to reset the lambda counter without removing it, but 
it
> can be done.  ...> I reset mine by making an impression of the dial 
with clay, marking
> the clay with ink, and pressing a small piece of plastic against the
> clay; I used a plastic bottle cap.  The ink left two dots on cap,
> forming a template.  I tapped two small brads into the dots and cut
> them to about 1-2 mm high with a dremel.
> 
> Or, you could remove and replace.
> 
> 
> Gus Schlachter



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Message: 17
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 19:24:11 -0000
From: "David Swingle" <dswingle_at_dml_enteract.com>
Subject: Re: Jump starting

I've got to jump in on this one. I can't understand what electrical 
engineering principle could possibly impact the requirement to 
connect the positive or the negative first, with respect to inrush 
surges as the connection is made. It's a single circuit. Current flow 
and resulting voltage sags/surges take a complete circuit, and will 
happen whether Pos or Neg is hooked up first. The surge is completely 
a function of the voltage offered (the battery) vs the load being 
connected-to (the car's electrical system). Hooking up one side or 
the other first makes no difference, no current flows until the final 
connection is made. 

The normal reason for connecting the positive first is that is less 
likely that you will touch a hot (+) wire to ground by accident, 
since the grounds aren't hooked up yet. Using jumper cables as an 
example, if you were to connect the neg circuit first, and then 
connect one end of the pos, and accidently drop the other one on the 
car body, you'd get a short and lots of sparks. If you connect the 
positive side first, later accidentally dropping the neg to part of 
the car would have no effect other than completing the circuit. 

Dave Swingle


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., srubano_at_dml_o... wrote:
> 
> By connecting the positive cable first THEN the negative cable, you 
> eliminate/minimize any surge that is sent into the electrical 
system 
> of BOTH cars. I have seen countless amount of times people 
installing 
> new batteries into their car and connecting the ground first then 
the 
> positive lead and then wonder why all of their bulbs all burnt out 
at 
> the same time in their dash board or why their computer fried.
> 
> Steve
> 




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Message: 18
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 22:39:39 -0000
From: srubano_at_dml_optonline.com
Subject: Re: Jump starting

MY mistake, I left off the shorting out part. 
It should have read "By connecting the positive cable first THEN the 
negative cable, you eliminate/minimize any surge that is sent into 
the electrical system of BOTH cars resulting from a short."  NOT "By 
connecting the positive cable first THEN the negative cable, you 
eliminate/minimize any surge that is sent into the electrical system 
of BOTH cars."

That's what happens when you leave the computer before finishing what 
you type, then returning and sending it before proof reading it 
before hitting the "send" button.

But whatever it may be, it's still a safety precaution to hook up the 
positive first.

Good thing for proofreaders to pick up mistakes. :-)
Steve

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "David Swingle" <dswingle_at_dml_e...> wrote:
> I've got to jump in on this one. I can't understand what electrical 
> engineering principle could possibly impact the requirement to 
> connect the positive or the negative first, with respect to inrush 
> surges as the connection is made. It's a single circuit. Current 
flow 



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Message: 19
Date: Fri, 08 Jun 2001 19:35:09 -0000
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com
Subject: : Re: A one off factory Delorean W/a SS frame (Was Delorean galvanized frames/

I think a while back someone one the list mentioned that Lotus had 
all the DeLorean prototype cars destroyed in the early 1990's.

The twin turbo car I'm guessing that you're refering to is vin 501. 
Last time I heard the car was for sale with a comple restoration 
included from DMC Houston. So I have no idea as to it's condition. My 
guess is it's still owned by the same man who acquired it at the 
auction after DMC closed. I managed to dig the man's name up in an 
article I have around here somewhere...

The prototype DeLorean from the Barret-Jackson was for sale at a 
classic car dealership a while back. I don't remember the name of the 
dealership, but it probably been sold by now.

-Robert
vin 6585



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., CBL302_at_dml_m... wrote:
<SNIP>
> has/is the 
> only Delorean that had a Stainless Steel Frame installed/authorized
> to be installed by JZD and Company,
<SNIP>
> ...14 Test Mules that Lotus Engineering had(the orange bodied 
> fiberglass Deloreans as pictured in SSI(page 113)AND where are  
> THOSE Deloreans

> Claude
> 000570




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Message: 20
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 02:47:08 -0500
From: "J Rowe" <rowejj_at_dml_netusa1.net>
Subject: Fuel Pump


        I have what could be a fairly dumb question. Whne you turn the key to the on 
position should you here the fuel pump run for a couple of seconds like they do on 
more modern cars or what? If I jump the rpm relay I can here ir run clear as day but
not when the car is running. If it should be running then what should I look for to get 
it to run like it should? Thanks in advance........................Jason


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 21
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 18:08:39 EDT
From: senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com
Subject: Tucker Car Collection & Bowie British Car Day


June 23-23, 2001. 

The 24th annual Bowie British Car day & tour of private Tucker Automobile 
collection.

I need those who are planning to attend the collection and dinner afterwards, 
to email me privately so that I can make dinner reservation.  We decided to 
dine on the exclusive Odyssey ship. The odyssey coasts along the Potomac 
River during dinner. The entire "roof structure" of the ship is made of 
glass, for impressive views of Washington DC's monuments and skyline. 

Please email me if you are planning to attend. There are 5 owners scheduled 
to attend.

Sincerely,
Mike Pack senatorpack(AT)cs.com
DOA 4743

MODERATOR NOTE: This is in Maryland near Baltimore.



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Message: 22
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 17:22:26 -0500
From: "B Benson" <delornut_at_dml_peoplepc.com>
Subject: Re: Crappy acceleration...

One of the things Michael Loasby mentioned at Eurofest was the fact that
many design changes added weight to the car and the gear ratios were raised
to maintain gas mileage figures. The Lotus Esprits of the 80's used the same
transaxle with but with different gear ratios and the final drive gear
ratios from the Lotus would benefit the DeLorean. The DeLorean used a 3.44:1
final drive while the Lotus used a 3.88:1. Unfortunately the ratios for
first through fifth in the Lotus would be too high for the low powered
DeLorean. One thing that is obvious is that horsepower isn't the only area
the DeLorean would need adjusted to become a true performance car. On the
other hand, the higher final drive makes the DeLorean a great cruiser for
higher speed over the road trips.

Bruce Benson



> I have a stupid question.  Why is the DeLorean so slow?  I have an 81
> automatic, and I don't expect it to be a race car or anything, but the
> acceleration off the line is laughable I was thinking it might be the gear
ratio of
> 1st gear is better on the Golf for acceleration, but (unscientific
> observation) they seem feel relatively the same.  >
> Thanks,
>
> Aaron King
> Kirkland, WA
> vin#1217





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Message: 23
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 21:38:06 EDT
From: njp548_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: galvanizing D frame?

In a message dated 6/8/01 3:15:09 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
hholtz467_at_dml_yahoo.com writes:

<< How tough would a Powder Coating be under normal driving conditions?   >>

I just had my whole frame powdercoated, and I can say that it came out great! 
 I did think about having the frame galvanized before powdercoating, to 
protect the frame from rust even more,  but with all the talk about it 
possibly warping under the high heat, turned me away from it.  Definitely NOT 
worth the risk.  Hope that helps.

Later,
Nick
1852
<A HREF="Http://members.aol.com/njp548">Http://members.aol.com/njp548</A>



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Message: 24
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 21:55:21 -0400
From: "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: questions (was: convex side mirror update)

In getting ready to make the first ever DeLorean convex side mirror, I took
my OEM side mirror apart to make a good pattern.  Now I have some questions:

The backing material (mounting surface) that holds the OEM mirror glass
obviously has been cut down from a larger piece meant for a different
application.  Can anyone say what this was from?

Upon removing the mirror glass, there is a single screw in the center of the
mounting pad.  I removed it, almost lost the washer that was under it, and
pulled it off.  Underneath is a motorized unit held down with three screws.
Since the mounting pad was cut down from a larger mirror, obviously the
motor unit that it attaches to is also from another application.  Can anyone
say what it crosses to?

I removed the three mounting screws to the motor unit and removed it.  It is
still attached by the wires (no connectors in site to totally separate it
from the car.)  I really don't need to disassemble it any further, but can
anyone say how this comes apart?

Since I had the motor unit in my hand, I thought now would be a good time to
clean & lubricate it.  There is one black screw in the center which I
removed.  This did nothing.  The entire motor assembly (plastic clam shell
design) appears to be held together with plastic posts which are melted
through holes.  It looks like it is not meant to ever be disassembled.
Comments anyone?

On both OEM mirror glasses, there are stains caused by air bubbles trapped
under the double sided tape.  There appears to be no fix for this other than
replacing the mirror glass (which I intend to do anyway -- with convex
ones!)  Has anyone else noticed such blemishes in their mirrors?

On both OEM mirrors, the mirror glass has sagged with age (the adhesive
didn't hold well) such that the lower edge of the glass drags on the bottom
of the outer housing making mirror adjustment difficult.  My car has low
miles and has obviously never been stored outdoors for any extended length
of time.  Despite this, the adhesive didn't hold very well.  Has anyone had
similar problems?  Maybe a previous owner stored my car in a very hot
garage.

I was able to remove the passenger mirror glass without breaking it.  First,
the adhesive on mine didn't hold very well to begin with.  Second, the
mounting pad is made of a flexible material (polypropylene?).  I could reach
my fingers behind the mirror and flex the mounting pad back to release the
adhesive.

My side mirrors are the earlier style.  (FYI, there were two versions of
side mirror housings.  Early ones were up to VIN 5929 and the newer version
started with VIN 5930.)  Can anyone say what is different about the two
versions?

So far I have found that on my '81, the mirror glasses are symmetrical from
side.  I.e. taking the right side off and flipping it over fits over the
left side mirror exactly.  Can anyone say if the dimensions of the mirror
glass is the same between the older and newer versions?  I have been told
already that the mirror glass is the same and that it is the shape of the
mirror housing that is different.  Does anyone agree with this or have a
comment?

The DeLorean mirror glass is the first modern car I have noticed that does
not have any etchings in the mirror's viewable area (model numbers, part
numbers, etc.)  Are all DeLorean mirrors this way?

Come hell or high water, I'm going to make convex mirrors to fit the
DeLorean.  If cutting them out on a somewhat medium scale is feasible, are
there any vendors out there who want to retail them?  And if so, how much do
you think you can sell them for (without price gouging)?  And how much would
you expect to buy them for wholesale?  I'm in this as a hobby and am not
looking to get rich quick.  I would rather sell many at a small profit
rather than a few at a large one.  I'm not interested in doing much retail
if any, so if there are any vendors who are interested then speak up.

Walt    Tampa, FL




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Message: 25
Date: Fri, 8 Jun 2001 22:09:46 EDT
From: senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com
Subject: Re: Tucker Car Collection & Bowie British Car Day

In a message dated 06/08/2001 8:20:10 PM Eastern Daylight Time, 
senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com writes:

<< MODERATOR NOTE: This is in Maryland near Baltimore. >>

This is in Maryland near Washington, DC.

If anyone needs directions please email me.
Sincerely,
Mike




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