From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 764
Date: Wednesday, October 31, 2001 6:41 PM

To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: unusual speedo failure
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com

2. Re: Re: unusual speedo failure
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com

3. Fall Foliage Tour
From: "Aaron C." <slider_ten_at_dml_hotmail.com>

4. RE: front brake rotor replacement
From: "Buckner, William" <William.Buckner_at_dml_pfizer.com>

5. Re: Re: front brake rotor replacement
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

6. Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net

7. Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

8. Tire Pressure
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net

9. Strange click
From: "S CAGLE" <sharkywtrs_at_dml_msn.com>

10. Re: MJ Fox, Rob Grady & Bob Zilla
From: senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com

11. Re: wet floor
From: "S CAGLE" <sharkywtrs_at_dml_msn.com>

12. Up to date styling?
From: "Michael Babb" <michael_at_dml_babbtechnology.com>

13. Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com

14. New photos of Sunstar's BTTF DeLorean now online
From: stephen_at_dml_bttf.com

15. Re: unusual speedo failure
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net

16. Re: Strange click
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net

17. Re: Strange click
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>

18. Re: Strange click
From: tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com

19. Brake Lights (again)
From: "Willie Mack" <wmack_at_dml_vt.edu>

20. Re: Re: unusual speedo failure
From: Henry Breer <hbreer_at_dml_ix.netcom.com>

21. Re: front brake rotor replacement
From: tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com

22. Throttle sticking - I think
From: Christian Williams <delorean_at_dml_framezero.com>

23. Re: Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

24. Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?
From: srubano_at_dml_optonline.com

25. RE: Re: Strange click
From: "Buckner, William" <William.Buckner_at_dml_pfizer.com>





Message: 1
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 03:46:50 -0000
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com
Subject: Re: unusual speedo failure

Had the same exact problem on my car. Dust cap had lost grip, and 
wasn't turning the speedo cable.

Easy no hasle fix: Buy a new cap. It's cheap, and simply snaps right 
on. No worrying about gluing, or fabricating anything.

-Robert
vin 6585



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., tobyp_at_dml_k... wrote:
> Several cars in our club have had the caps repaired by applying 
> electrical tape to the outside edge of the cap to make it snug in 
the 
> hub or spindle.  This is a fairly common problem, from what we've 
> seen. Another challenge is that the cap becomes "rounded off" 
inside...
<SNIP>




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Message: 2
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2001 23:20:13 EST
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: unusual speedo failure

Walt and group. What if I had a metal cap made with extra beef / metal where 
the cable installs. I have a machine shop that loves specials. They just 
turned me 60 small pullys for the alternators for $5.00 ea. My original 
source had dried up, so it was either turn them or get out of the alternator 
business. Now the other source buy's from me. 
What does the group think. New metal caps.
John Hervey
http://www.specialtauto.com/

 



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Message: 3
Date: Sat, 1 Jan 2000 00:10:34 -0500
From: "Aaron C." <slider_ten_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Fall Foliage Tour



  Hello,

  As the only enthusiast on this tour, I would personally like to thank
everyone who came and made me feel like an owner, even if I won't have a
Delorean for at least  two more years.  Mike DeLuca, Nick Pitello, Mark, Dan
and everyone else who's names I didn't catch.  Also, a special thanks to Rob
and Debbie for reminding me how great they are by being friendly and just
overall great.  Not once did I feel like the 'odd man out' and everyone was
happy to see my red Plymouth at the tail end of the caravan.

  I hope to see you all soon!

  -Aaron Crocco
  NYS Plate: OUTATYM



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Message: 4
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 07:51:21 -0500
From: "Buckner, William" <William.Buckner_at_dml_pfizer.com>
Subject: RE: front brake rotor replacement

Walt,

I had the same problem with my Suburban a while back (1990 with 218,000
miles so far).  I had a panic stop with a trailer attached that heated
things up real bad.  After that I had pulsating brakes.  The brake rotors
were only one week old.  The problem was traced to "cheap" rotors bought at
a NAPA store.  You know the ones, the one year warranty instead of lifetime?
I replaced them with the higher quality (from the same NAPA store) and the
problem went away for ever.  I suggest replacement of the rotors with some
from the premium suppliers of Delorean parts.  

P.S.  I sure complement your tenacity, Walt.  I think you could write this
groups reports by yourself.  The issues you have had with your car have been
both enlightening and entertaining.  Thanks for your constant input.



Bill Buckner

Instrumentation Supervisor
Electrical and Instrument Dept.
Pfizer, Inc.
Global Manufacturing
Holland, MI Facility
   %   Phone:  616-392-2375  x-2449
 *   Fax:      616-392-8267
     *  Email:    william.buckner_at_dml_pfizer.com




-----Original Message-----
From: Dick Ryan [mailto:deloreanbiker_at_dml_yahoo.com]
Sent: Tuesday, October 30, 2001 2:20 PM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [DML] front brake rotor replacement



Driving hard in the mountains of Colorado I'm sure I
often do the equivalent of two quick consecutive panic
stops from 60mph.  My rotors haven't warped.  

I suspect the problem lies elsewhere.

Dick ryan

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Message: 5
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 11:06:17 EST
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: front brake rotor replacement

In a message dated 10/30/01 8:50:24 PM Central Standard Time, 
tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com writes:


> .  I removed the dust 
> shields to allow free flow of air through the area to enhance cooling. 
> I installed new pads (Metalux brand) that run about 200 - 250 degrees 
> 

i thought the dust shields had a second function - to DIRECT air onto the 
brakes for cooling????

Andy

Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 6
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 15:17:44 -0000
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net
Subject: Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?

Even with the air sensor plate at rest position some fuel must flow. 
How would you expect the engine to idle without fuel? It is very 
difficult to accuratly diagnose the fuel system without an injector 
tester and a fuel pressure gauge. The best advice is to clean 
everything up as good as you can, fix all leaks, see that all of the 
injectors have a decent pattern and flow equally. Change the fuel 
filter and then see how well the motor runs. Make sure you have 
flushed all of the kerosene out of the system before trying to start 
the motor. This is a continuous injector system ie: it always flows 
fuel to all injecters, it doesn't know when each cylinder fires. Be 
very careful that you have NO fuel leaks under pressure, it can become 
very dangerous if in fact there is even a minor one.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



-- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., jugeauj_at_dml_g... wrote:
> 
> Hi All,
> 
>    Not having played with this type of injection system before I'm 
not sure
> of what I'm looking at concerning how the fuel injectors are 
supposed to
> work.
> 
>    I've finally gotten around to hooking the fuel lines back up on 
#4337.
> Long story short, from what I can deduce and from what I've been 
told from
> previous owners (#2 and #3, I'm #4), the car sat around with water
> throughout its fuel lines for the better part of ten years.
> Suffice it to say a lot of parts have been replaced.
> 
>    Using kerosene (less explosive fumes to contend with), I unhooked 
the
> fuel pump and wired a 12V battery across it (happen to be more 
convenient
> at the time than bypassing via the fuse box, etc.) and watched for 
what
> kind of crud came through.
> 
>    Then came the check for leaks around the distributor, etc.
> Mostly out of curiosity, I pulled two injectors out and ran the pump 
again.
> Both injectors emitted a thin stream (not a spray) of fluid.
> Just to test the injectors themselves I went ahead and pressed down 
on the
> airflow sensor and got a nice spray pattern (yeah, I know the 
catalytic is
> probably going to love me for that).
> I was lead to believe that with the airflow sensor completely closed 
(as in
> the case with the engine not running) no fuel should make it's way 
to the
> injectors. Is this true?
> Is the distributor supposed to allow raw fuel into the intake or is 
there a
> problem stemming from either of the following:
> 1) Central fuel plunger valve (sorry, don't know the correct name 
for it)
> in the fuel distributor is bad?
> 2) The 12V battery I used couldn't work the pump up to around 65psi 
thereby
> not charging the system with enough fuel pressure for the plunger 
and other
> associated components to function properly?
> 3)  Fuel filter was significantly plugged up to restrict fuel flow 
thereby
> yielding the same problem(s) as in #2)?
> 
> I apologize if this turns out to be a relatively basic question.
> I only get to work on the car on weekends and didn't give myself 
enough
> time to experiment on my own (getting fuel pressure readings, etc).
> I figured I'd ask the group during the week to fuel myself with more
> information to work with this coming weekend.
> 
> Thanks a lot,
> 
> Louis




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Message: 7
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 11:00:37 EST
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?

Hello Louis,

having water in the gas for 10 years is probably the worst thing i can think 
of to have to deal with as far as the fuel system goes.  this is so stupid 
because if there's water in it, all you have to do is siphon the tank, clean 
it out, put fresh gas in and add that water break-up stuff, and you should be 
ok.  why anyone would just let the car sit is beyond me.....  but anyway.
let's see if i can help....

In a message dated 10/30/01 6:09:44 PM Central Standard Time, 
jugeauj_at_dml_gdls.com writes:
> I was lead to believe that with the airflow sensor completely closed (as in
> the case with the engine not running) no fuel should make it's way to the
> injectors. Is this true?

this is true.  as far as the '2 drops per second' rule, that's what the 
average injector will leak into the cylinders with the plate closed.  however 
this is for the average worn injector.  if you have brand new injectors 
(which is a MUST with rusty fuel parts!!), they should not leak at all.  if 
you haven't replaced them, do it now.

> Is the distributor supposed to allow raw fuel into the intake or is there a
> problem stemming from either of the following:
> 1) Central fuel plunger valve (sorry, don't know the correct name for it)
> in the fuel distributor is bad?

i think the name for it is the fuel distributer regulator pin, but it doesn't 
matter.  this could be a problem if you haven't had the fuel distributer 
cleaned by a pro or just replaced it.  you see, the pin fits into the 
distributer so well that when you try to pull it out, it creates vacuum 
inside the orifice.  that's how well-machined the distributer is.  the pin 
and distributer are a matched pair at the factory - you cannot buy a new pin. 
 if it is chipped or corroded, you need a new distributer - $1000 new.  
(gulp).  it's possible that the pin has been corroded by rust and it's now 
leaking your fuel to the injectors when it shouldn't be.  this isn't too 
tough to verify - just time consuming.  if you haven't done it yet, remove 
all the lines from your fuel distributer and unscrew the top three screws 
which secure it to the air meter housing.  CAREFULLY lift it off the housing 
- the pin just rests in there and you aren't careful it will slip out and 
fall down into your engine bay or something.  then you're pretty much screwed 
because if the pin even gets scratched or takes a tiny chip, it's probably 
done for.  take the dist off the housing and inspect the pin.  look into all 
the holes that go into the distributer and look for wear or rust.  carefully 
remove the primary pressure regulator and check that for wear and rust.  you 
may have a damaged distributer.


> 2) The 12V battery I used couldn't work the pump up to around 65psi thereby
> not charging the system with enough fuel pressure for the plunger and other
> associated components to function properly?

i would advise against doing this.  you will destroy the pump if you run it 
without sucking gas for even a second.  the gas is the lubrication for the 
pump!  i have done it myself by jumping it with a battery to see if my old 
one worked it not.  it didn't after that!  also, the sparks from the jumper 
cables could blow up the pump with all the vapors in there! Bosch told me 
that the fuel pump is capable of producing around 7 bar of fuel pressure, but 
a lot of that gets returned to the tank.  you can only test fuel pressure 
with a K-Jetronic fuel pressure tester between the distributer and control 
pressure regulator as described in the shop manual.  your system pressure 
(primary) should lie around 4.8-5.4 bar.

3)  Fuel filter was significantly plugged up to restrict fuel flow thereby

> 

this is easily diagnosed - just replace it, if you haven't already!

water in the gas for a long period of time is the worst thing that can happen 
to your fuel system.  you seriously must replace EVERYTHING if in doubt. if 
you have found rust in your banjo fittings, your injectors, or in the main 
metal fuel lines, you have to replace stuff.  that includes - draining and 
cleaning fuel tank, replacing fuel accumulator, fuel filter, distributer, 
CPR, cold start valve, injectors, fuel pump, and probably every fitting in 
there too. VERY $$$.  when working on the fuel system, you better buy a 
K-Jetronic fuel injection pressure tester.  i recommend buying one from 
Tool-Aid.com.  only $89 including both primary and control pressure readings, 
all the fittings needed, instructions, and a durable plastic case.  sweet 
deal!

good luck,
Andy 


Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 8
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 05:02:08 -0000
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net
Subject: Tire Pressure

I have noticed how many drivers do not pay enough attention to their 
tires and tire pressure in general not only on Deloreans but all cars 
in general. It is critically important to NEVER drive on underinflated 
tires. It is much safer to drive on an overinflated tire than an 
underinflated one. Tires lose approx 1 psi for every 10 degrees drop 
in temperature. Tires also lose about 1 psi per month. At this time of 
the year with temps dropping 20-30 degrees in a couple of months the 
tire is 5-6 psi underinflated. This causes unsafe handling, increased 
tire wear, and increased fuel consumption. Tires should be checked at 
least monthly with once a week or before any long trip the best 
advice. Tire pressure should be checked in the morning before driving 
as driving heats the tire and increases the pressure. (Don't check a 
hot tire and let air out.) Use a quality tire gauge that costs more 
than a buck! Always follow manufacturers recomendations, there should 
always be a label on the car with the tire information regarding size, 
pressure, and load range. On the Delorean the front is 23 psi the rear 
30 and the spare (don't forget it) 60 psi. The tire label is in the 
glove box on the inside of the door. While you are looking at the tire 
look at the sides for bulges and the tread for depth comparing it to 
the tread indicators and eveness of wear. On the Delorean we can't 
rotate the tires like on most cars so you want to catch uneven wear 
before you ruin the tires. Use valve caps to keep dirt out of the 
valves. If you feel vibrations at highway speeds with your foot off 
the brake get the wheels balanced to reduce wear. Use a good quality 
tire cleaner with U V protection to keep the tires looking good and 
longer lasting. This is good advice for any car you or your family 
drives.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757




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Message: 9
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2001 23:49:55 -0500
From: "S CAGLE" <sharkywtrs_at_dml_msn.com>
Subject: Strange click

  
As minute as this may seem, I do suffer from a terrible case of paranoia when it comes to my car, so I figured I'd throw this one in.  Along with all the other rattles and squeaks that comes along with a 20 year old car that's driven every day around rural NC (where the potholes can swallow a Winnebego) I have suddenly noticed this steady click coming from the instrument cluster.  It happens about every 5-10 seconds and sounds just like the click that the turn signal gives.  Anyone think this is important, or is my paranoia getting to me again?

Scott


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 10
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2001 20:50:34 EST
From: senatorpack_at_dml_cs.com
Subject: Re: MJ Fox, Rob Grady & Bob Zilla

In a message dated 10/30/2001 1:56:47 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
jhuckins_at_dml_cybersurfers.net writes:

<< It's sad that Michael J. Fox is fighting Parkinson's.  It's a very
 positive thing that Bob Zilla and Rob Grady, in concert, decided to do
 something to help. >>


    I agree with Les, Rob Grady & Bob Zilla are some awesome guys! I want all 
of you to stop and think for a moment how much the THREE of theses guys have 
added to your enjoyment to the DeLorean car. It's high time we honor their 
cause as a community and get the wheels rolling.

Sincerely,
Michael Pack



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Message: 11
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2001 23:33:23 -0500
From: "S CAGLE" <sharkywtrs_at_dml_msn.com>
Subject: Re: wet floor

  
Cameron;

I had the same problem on my passenger side footwell.  Turns out it was one of the sealing screws inside the vent.  If you have the service bulletins, it tells all about water leaks and the most frequent places they occur.  A little bit of silicone sealent did the trick.   


Scott

16738


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 12
Date: Tue, 30 Oct 2001 23:43:58 -0500
From: "Michael Babb" <michael_at_dml_babbtechnology.com>
Subject: Up to date styling?


The question as to whether the styling of the DeLorean has held up or not
has come up on the list from time to time.  I actually created a web page
about a year ago that shows some of the things that were "new and different"
in 1982, as well as the styling of some cars that were developed about the
same time as the DeLorean (late 70's to early 80's).

The page is available at http://www.babbtechnology.com/time/index.htm. Check
it out, then you be the judge as to whether the styling has held up or not!

Cheers!

MICHAEL C. BABB






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Message: 13
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 16:23:37 -0000
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com
Subject: Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?

If your fuel system is damaged to the point of having to replace the 
fuel distributor it would make a lot of sense to replace the CIS 
entirely with EFI ... unless your a purist or a councourse 
enthusiast. Fuel distributors are expensive and getting hard to find, 
plus cannot be reliablly rebuilt. Once converted, and you're doing 
most of the work right now, EFI will be a lot easier to maintain and 
live with in general.




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Message: 14
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 16:26:54 -0000
From: stephen_at_dml_bttf.com
Subject: New photos of Sunstar's BTTF DeLorean now online

BTTF.com recently received a batch of photos from Sunstar of the new 
upcoming 1:18 scale BTTF DeLorean coming out in December, and they're 
now posted for viewing at http://www.BTTF.com/backtalk/ along with 
some other upcoming DeLorean collectibles.

-- Stephen _at_dml_ BTTF.com




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Message: 15
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 16:52:59 -0000
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net
Subject: Re: unusual speedo failure

This could be a bad idea. Many mechanical systems are designed with a 
"fuse" type element in them so that a "disposeable" part fails 
protecting more expensive or delicate parts in the system. This 
plastic cap is probably designed to fail in the event the speedo cable 
jams or the angle drive fails. If you had a fuse that keeps blowing 
you wouldn't stick a piece of wire in instead would you? This is 
analogous to what you propose. As often happens people focus on the 
symptom without concern for the root cause or the total design of a 
system. If you look at most speedo drives they are driven by a plastic 
gear. This is done for two reasons, they are cheap to change if you 
want different ratios but more importantly they will strip out in the 
event of a jam-up.
David Teitelbaum
vi 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., dherv10_at_dml_a... wrote:
> Walt and group. What if I had a metal cap made with extra beef / 
metal where 
> the cable installs. I have a machine shop that loves specials. They 
just 
> turned me 60 small pullys for the alternators for $5.00 ea. My 
original 
> source had dried up, so it was either turn them or get out of the 
alternator 
> business. Now the other source buy's from me. 
> What does the group think. New metal caps.
> John Hervey
> http://www.specialtauto.com/




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Message: 16
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 17:06:07 -0000
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net
Subject: Re: Strange click

One way to narrrow down the source of the noise would be to pull fuses 
one at a  time and see which one causes the noise to stop. Now you at 
least have an idea were to look. Be very suspicous of any wiring that 
is not origional to the car. Many time I have seen things that were 
added improperly causing all kinds of weird problems. The only way to 
start was to tear it all out by the roots and if I had any 
documentation try to reinstall correctly. Burglar alarms in particular 
can give you fits especially if they are tied into the ignition or 
starting systems. They can interconnect many systems like lights, 
horn, ignition, starting etc. When they malfunction you wouldn't 
believe the trouble they can cause!
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "S CAGLE" <sharkywtrs_at_dml_m...> wrote:
>   
> As minute as this may seem, I do suffer from a terrible case of 
paranoia when it comes to my car, so I figured I'd throw this one in. 
 Along with all the other rattles and squeaks that comes along with a 
20 year old car that's driven every day around rural NC (where the 
potholes can swallow a Winnebego) I have suddenly noticed this steady 
click coming from the instrument cluster.  It happens about every 5-10 
seconds and sounds just like the click that the turn signal gives.  
Anyone think this is important, or is my paranoia getting to me again?
> 
> Scott
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 17
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 19:02:16 +0000
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>
Subject: Re: Strange click

Dodgy intermittent wiper relay? Sounds like that and comes from there....

Just realised today that a) I HAD an intermittent setting and b) how to turn it on, and then off afterwards....

Martin
#1458 - should be running tomorrow

S CAGLE wrote:

>
> As minute as this may seem, I do suffer from a terrible case of paranoia when it comes to my car, so I figured I'd throw this one in.  Along with all the other rattles and squeaks that comes along with a 20 year old car that's driven every day around rural NC (where the potholes can swallow a Winnebego) I have suddenly noticed this steady click coming from the instrument cluster.  It happens about every 5-10 seconds and sounds just like the click that the turn signal gives.  Anyone think this is important, or is my paranoia getting to me again?
>
> Scott




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Message: 18
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 19:27:22 -0000
From: tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com
Subject: Re: Strange click

You might want to check out the Lambda counter that is installed just 
above the clutch pedal.  It has a little gear drive in it that may be 
the source of the click.  You can disconnect the speedo cable from the 
counter, and drive the car.  If the click goes away, the counter has 
apparently developed a "hitch in its get along".  If it doesn't go 
away, then the source of the click is something else.  How's that for 
a scientific conclusion? 

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "S CAGLE" <sharkywtrs_at_dml_m...> wrote:
>   
> As minute as this may seem, I do suffer from a terrible case of 
paranoia when it comes to my car, so I figured I'd throw this one in.  
Along with all the other rattles and squeaks that comes along with a 
20 year old car that's driven every day around rural NC (where the 
potholes can swallow a Winnebego) I have suddenly noticed this steady 
click coming from the instrument cluster.  It happens about every 5-10 
seconds and sounds just like the click that the turn signal gives.  
Anyone think this is important, or is my paranoia getting to me again?
> 
> Scott
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 19
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 12:43:37 -0500
From: "Willie Mack" <wmack_at_dml_vt.edu>
Subject: Brake Lights (again)


Alright guys, my brake lights still don't work.  I took them apart and
looked at them closely. It appears that the previous owner tried soldering
the bulb sockets back to the board, because every socket has a little piece
of solder on it.  It is safe to rule that out as a possibility?  Where else
could i look for the solution?

Thanks
  Willie Mack
  Vin 5043




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Message: 20
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 09:54:29 -0800
From: Henry Breer <hbreer_at_dml_ix.netcom.com>
Subject: Re: Re: unusual speedo failure

John,

REALLY BAD IDEA.

The nylon dust shield is only a $15 piece and is available from all the usual sources. If
the angle drive seizes and the shaft 'drills' the dust shield (turning the square hole
round), this is a safety feature. There is always the possibility of being able to clean
and lubricate the angle drive and salvage it. With a metal cap,  you are guaranteed of
destroying the angle drive and facing a $240 replacement.

Hank Breer

dherv10_at_dml_aol.com wrote:

> Walt and group. What if I had a metal cap made with extra beef / metal where
> the cable installs. I have a machine shop that loves specials. They just
> <snip>




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Message: 21
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 18:25:17 -0000
From: tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com
Subject: Re: front brake rotor replacement

The dust shields are positioned to prevent the flow of air from the 
underside of the car, out towards the wheels.  That is how the shields 
are supposed to help keep the wheels clean.  I may be incorrect in my 
view of the situation, but anything that is designed to reduce or 
eliminate airflow in any direction cannot be good for enhancing 
cooling.

As an aside to Walt, I read the follow-on message with more 
information about his pulsation, and I will offer the following idea.  
The fore/aft location of the front suspension lower control arm is set 
by the connection with the front anti-sway bar.  If there is any wear 
or damage to the components in this connection, the alignment of the 
front wheels becomes "variable" depending on loading conditions on the 
wheel.  If you detach the front anti-sway bar from its saddle clamps, 
and then detach it from the lower control arm at the threaded ends 
where it connects with the lower control arm, you can remove and 
inspect the rubber bushings that define that connection.  Experience 
has shown that the bushings will be compressed, with cracks in the 
rubber, and you will see more damage on the aft bushings.  These take 
all the pounding during braking.  The bushings are cheap, and easy to 
replace.  You will have to get another alignment after this 
replacement, but it should hold better.  I fabricated urethane 
bushings for my car, and am enjoying "rock solid" performance from my 
suspension. 

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., Soma576_at_dml_a... wrote:
> In a message dated 10/30/01 8:50:24 PM Central Standard Time, 
> tobyp_at_dml_k... writes:
> 
> 
> > .  I removed the dust 
> > shields to allow free flow of air through the area to enhance 
cooling. 
> > I installed new pads (Metalux brand) that run about 200 - 250 
degrees 
> > 
> 
> i thought the dust shields had a second function - to DIRECT air 
onto the 
> brakes for cooling????
> 
> Andy
> 
> Soma576_at_dml_a...
> 1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
> Fargo, ND 58102
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 22
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 12:01:49 -0800 (PST)
From: Christian Williams <delorean_at_dml_framezero.com>
Subject: Throttle sticking - I think

Well I've been trying to pin this one down for a little while. The
situation is that when i drive around for a little while, my throttle
appears to stick and I idle at around 1500 RPM. The throttle spool appears
to return fully, but it's not until I push down on the arm (the one that
trips the idle microswitch) that it drops down to about 900 RPM (where
it's set to idle). I adjusted the screw that trips the microswitch, but
that doesn't seem to be the problem. When idling high, I've taken a dowel
and triped the microswitch without disturbing the arm. No difference. But
then when I press the arm down, the idle drops to 900.

Is there something else that that arm is tripping? Something else that
needs to be adjusted?

Happy Halloween!

-Christian




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Message: 23
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 15:28:41 EST
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?

In a message dated 10/31/01 11:28:36 AM Central Standard Time, jwit6_at_dml_cs.com 
writes:


> If your fuel system is damaged to the point of having to replace the 
> fuel distributor it would make a lot of sense to replace the CIS 
> 

you've been talking about this quite a bit lately.
can you tell me what the approximate cost is in parts in order to do this, 
minus labor charges?  just the parts price please.

Andy

Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 24
Date: Thu, 01 Nov 2001 00:26:35 -0000
From: srubano_at_dml_optonline.com
Subject: Re: DMC How are the fuel injector suppose to work in this system?

If the engine is off and you are just running the fuel pump you 
should get NO fuel from the injectors. When you press down on the 
airflow sensor you should see a stream of fuel spray out. If your CO 
is off or the air flow meter is binding (slightly down, stuck open a 
little) this would explain why you are getting fuel from the 
injectors when the engine is Off and the fuel pump is running and 
the air flow meter is not pressed down. Check that the plate on the 
airflow meter is centered (page D:01:16, 3rd bullet under "Mixture 
Control Unit"). Make sure it has the required clearence from the air 
meter housing opening otherwise it will not close fully.

Steve

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., jugeauj_at_dml_g... wrote:
> 
> Hi All,
> 
>    Not having played with this type of injection system before I'm 
not sure
> of what I'm looking at concerning how the fuel injectors are 
supposed to
> work.
> 
>    I've finally gotten around to hooking the fuel lines back up on 
#4337.
> Long story short, from what I can deduce and from what I've been 
told from
> previous owners (#2 and #3, I'm #4), the car sat around with water
> throughout its fuel lines for the better part of ten years.
> Suffice it to say a lot of parts have been replaced.
> 
>    Using kerosene (less explosive fumes to contend with), I 
unhooked the
> fuel pump and wired a 12V battery across it (happen to be more 
convenient
> at the time than bypassing via the fuse box, etc.) and watched for 
what
> kind of crud came through.
> 
>    Then came the check for leaks around the distributor, etc.
> Mostly out of curiosity, I pulled two injectors out and ran the 
pump again.
> Both injectors emitted a thin stream (not a spray) of fluid.
> Just to test the injectors themselves I went ahead and pressed 
down on the
> airflow sensor and got a nice spray pattern (yeah, I know the 
catalytic is
> probably going to love me for that).
> I was lead to believe that with the airflow sensor completely 
closed (as in
> the case with the engine not running) no fuel should make it's way 
to the
> injectors. Is this true?
> Is the distributor supposed to allow raw fuel into the intake or 
is there a
> problem stemming from either of the following:
> 1) Central fuel plunger valve (sorry, don't know the correct name 
for it)
> in the fuel distributor is bad?
> 2) The 12V battery I used couldn't work the pump up to around 
65psi thereby
> not charging the system with enough fuel pressure for the plunger 
and other
> associated components to function properly?
> 3)  Fuel filter was significantly plugged up to restrict fuel flow 
thereby
> yielding the same problem(s) as in #2)?
> 
> I apologize if this turns out to be a relatively basic question.
> I only get to work on the car on weekends and didn't give myself 
enough
> time to experiment on my own (getting fuel pressure readings, etc).
> I figured I'd ask the group during the week to fuel myself with 
more
> information to work with this coming weekend.
> 
> Thanks a lot,
> 
> Louis




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Message: 25
Date: Wed, 31 Oct 2001 15:14:46 -0500
From: "Buckner, William" <William.Buckner_at_dml_pfizer.com>
Subject: RE: Re: Strange click

It may be an inertia switch from a burglar alarm.


Bill Buckner

Instrumentation Supervisor
Electrical and Instrument Dept.
Pfizer, Inc.
Global Manufacturing
Holland, MI Facility
   %   Phone:  616-392-2375  x-2449
 *   Fax:      616-392-8267
     *  Email:    william.buckner_at_dml_pfizer.com




-----Original Message-----
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net [mailto:jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net]
Sent: Wednesday, October 31, 2001 12:06 PM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: [DML] Re: Strange click


One way to narrrow down the source of the noise would be to pull fuses 
one at a  time and see which one causes the noise to stop. Now you at 
least have an idea were to look. Be very suspicous of any wiring that 
is not origional to the car. Many time I have seen things that were 
added improperly causing all kinds of weird problems. The only way to 
start was to tear it all out by the roots and if I had any 
documentation try to reinstall correctly. Burglar alarms in particular 
can give you fits especially if they are tied into the ignition or 
starting systems. They can interconnect many systems like lights, 
horn, ignition, starting etc. When they malfunction you wouldn't 
believe the trouble they can cause!
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "S CAGLE" <sharkywtrs_at_dml_m...> wrote:
>   
> As minute as this may seem, I do suffer from a terrible case of 
paranoia when it comes to my car, so I figured I'd throw this one in. 
 Along with all the other rattles and squeaks that comes along with a 
20 year old car that's driven every day around rural NC (where the 
potholes can swallow a Winnebego) I have suddenly noticed this steady 
click coming from the instrument cluster.  It happens about every 5-10 
seconds and sounds just like the click that the turn signal gives.  
Anyone think this is important, or is my paranoia getting to me again?
> 
> Scott
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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