From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 787
Date: Friday, November 16, 2001 9:57 PM

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There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Leatherique
From: "Joe Thome" <joethome_at_dml_jps.net>

2. RE: More Sunstar Model Woes...How to fix your Woes
From: "Buckner, William" <William.Buckner_at_dml_pfizer.com>

3. Re: TA Bolt questions
From: tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com

4. Re: Courtesies relay?!?!?
From: Carl <carlmailuk_at_dml_yahoo.co.uk>

5. Re: TA Bolt questions
From: tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com

6. Bah, heck, darn it. Angle drive issues.
From: Noah <sitz_at_dml_onastick.net>

7. Re: Re: More Sunstar Doorl Woes...
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com

8. Trailing arm bolts 12.9
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com

9. Re: Broken Muffler Bracket.
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com

10. RE: Fuel Pump Glitch
From: "Scott Mueller" <scott.a.mueller_at_dml_worldnet.att.net>

11. Re: More Sunstar Model Woes...How to fix your Woes
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com

12. Re: Reverse Light Switch.
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com

13. Removing dome light...
From: "Adam Price" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>

14. Reverse Switch Backup Light Cross Reference
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com

15. Re: Leatherique
From: Les Huckins <jhuckins_at_dml_cybersurfers.net>

16. Re: Leatherique
From: Les Huckins <jhuckins_at_dml_cybersurfers.net>

17. Re: Leatherique
From: "Ed Garbade" <edgarbade_at_dml_hotmail.com>

18. watch
From: "Gabriel H. Prado" <gprado_at_dml_josephreina.com>

19. Re: TA Bolt questions
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net

20. Re: Reverse Light Switch.
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com

21. Re: TA Bolt questions
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com

22. Re: any Ann Arbor, MI owners on the south end?
From: pbmain_at_dml_mindspring.com

23. M9 1.00 bolt?????????
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

24. Re: Bah, heck, darn it. Angle drive issues.
From: "Jan van de Wouw" <Jan_at_dml_vdWouw.Demon.nl>

25. TA Bolt discussion
From: Mark Noeltner <mark_at_dml_buffalochips.org>





Message: 1
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 12:17:18 -0800
From: "Joe Thome" <joethome_at_dml_jps.net>
Subject: Re: Leatherique

Less,

Aside from the smell of leather you are now enjoying, did using Leatherique
improve the appearace and feel of the leather itself?

I ordered some Leatherique but stopped short of using it because of not
being sure I wanted to follow the part of the instructions where it says to
"Park the car in the sun with the windows rolled up to create a steam room
for as long as practical, several hour or a day." Did you follow that part
of the instructions and if so did you see any adverse effect on any other
part of the car's interior?

Many thanks.

Joe Thome
VIN 6467 since 2/12/01




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Message: 2
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 15:26:53 -0500
From: "Buckner, William" <William.Buckner_at_dml_pfizer.com>
Subject: RE: More Sunstar Model Woes...How to fix your Woes

This is as it should be!  Concerned collectors making others aware of
repairs for failures.  I think this is definitely in the sport of this
communication system.  Sincere thanks Claude.

Bill Buckner

Instrumentation Supervisor
Electrical and Instrument Dept.
Pfizer, Inc.
Global Manufacturing
Holland, MI Facility

-----Original Message-----
From: CBL302_at_dml_msn.com [mailto:CBL302_at_dml_msn.com]
Subject: [DML] More Sunstar Model Woes...How to fix your Woes
Jeff,

Like you my passenger door too also,did not stay up on my 1/18 
model,so what I did was to disassemble my Delorean Model
Claude
000570
Windsor Ct.



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Message: 3
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 22:06:30 -0000
From: tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com
Subject: Re: TA Bolt questions

John, and "The List" - 

After reading post # 21251 from John, I felt that I had to help 
clarify a couple of points.  Also, I have had several requests for a 
technical comparison of several of the bolts that have been discussed. 
I have the data, and will be doing that piece shortly.

John has suggested that bending of the bolt is not a bad thing, and 
could almost be considered somewhat beneficial.  I will dare to repeat 
a statement that I made earlier, "Bolt bending in this joint is not 
acceptable".  When the bolt bends, there is motion between the sleeves 
in the arm and bushing, and the washers and shims that occupy the rest 
of the space in the joint.  This motion causes wear, which leads to 
loosening of the joint clamp-up.  In our case, the bolt is also 
yielding (permanently stretching) in many cars, due to applied loads 
from the car, combined with induced loads from the bolt torqueing.  As 
the joint becomes loose, the bending stresses in the bolt increase, 
which results in more yielding.  The eventual result will almost 
always be fatigue failure of the bolt, usually at the first thread 
next to the shank of the bolt.  If there is rust or corrosion on the 
bolt, then the stress concentrations caused by the corrosion pits will 
create a starting point for any cracks (My failed bolt had the crack 
start in small corrosion pits).  I can support all of this with facts 
and data.  This is not my opinion ... this involves physics, 
engineering principles, and the mechanical properties of materials.

The second point I wanted to clarify is in regards to the subjects of 
"fail safety and structural redundancy".  A "fail-safe joint" means 
that if any one component fails, there are other load paths that will 
pick up the loads, and keep the joint together.  If the rubber bushing 
fails, the trailing arm will remain in place (although it will rattle 
and clunk) because of the large flat washers on one side of the frame, 
and the arm itself on the other.  The same is true if the attachment 
bolts for the bushing assembly to the frame fail (I had this happen a 
couple of years ago ... made some noise, but no big deal).  If the 
frame or the trailing arm start to fail from buckling or cracking, 
visual inspection will find it long before there is a complete failure 
(has this ever happened ? ... I doubt it).  However, if the trailing 
arm bolt fails, the joint is completely lost.  There is no redundancy, 
no alternate load path.  A critical component with no back up, whose 
loss could result in catastrophic loss of control or major damage to 
the car.  This situation is not allowed anywhere in the aviation or 
aerospace industries.  I don't think that we should accept it here 
either.  Colin Chapman was a sharp guy, but he dropped the ball in 
this case (IMHO).  We can't necessarily redesign the entire joint, but 
we can improve the components in order to minimize the risk.

Toby Peterson  VIN 2248
Winged1


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., dherv10_at_dml_a... wrote:
> Walt and others, Don't get me wrong, The application engineer told 
me this. 





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Message: 4
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 23:49:01 GMT
From: Carl <carlmailuk_at_dml_yahoo.co.uk>
Subject: Re: Courtesies relay?!?!?

Since it works without the light delay (which I imagine is a combination of
a capacitor and a resistor ..the car being 20y old as it is...) Id guess the 
capacitor has gone short circuit in the white delay box.

Carl




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Message: 5
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 01:36:53 -0000
From: tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com
Subject: Re: TA Bolt questions

Hello List -- This is a reply to a request for technical comparisons 
of different types of bolts.  It will require some technical details.  
Those that are not interested can click the "next" button.  As defined 
earlier, I will recap some terms that need to be discussed.  All are 
expressed in "KSI", which is 'thousands of pounds per square inch'. 
"Ftu" is the allowable ultimate tensile stress (tensile strength).  
"Fty" is the allowable tensile yield stress (when it starts to 
permanently stretch).  "Fcy" is the allowable compressive yield stress 
(when it starts to permanently buckle or crumple).  "e" is the 
elongation, expressed as a percentage.  Basically, the lower the 
number, the more brittle the material at failure.  "E" is the modulus 
of elasticity, which is a measure of the 'stiffness' of the material 
when subjected to a load (this number is expressed as KSI X 1,000).  
The lower the number, the more bending or deflection you will get for 
a given load.  Okay ... are you ready?

The "8.8" bolt has Ftu = 120, Fty & Fcy = 96, E = 29, e = 12%
The "10.9" bolt has Ftu = 151, Fty & Fcy = 136, E = 29, e = 9%
The "12.9" bolt has Ftu = 177, Fty & Fcy = 160, E = 29, e = 8%

The above came from the ASTM Materials Handbook.  The 8.8 is about 
equivalent to the SAE grade 5, the 10.9 is about the same as SAE grade 
8, and there is no SAE equivalent for the 12.9.  The above bolts are 
alloy steel, and must be plated for corrosion protection.  I should 
note that my fractured 10.9 checked out at Ftu = 136 using Rockwell 
hardness methods.  I had said in post #21114 that my guess at the 
material for the stock bolt was 4130 steel with a Ftu range of 125 - 
145 KSI.  This was based on the opinion of the metallurgist who did 
the hardness test.  I didn't ask for a spectroscopic analysis of the 
material to verify the chemistry.  For that material, the Fty is 103 
KSI, and the Fcy is 113 KSI.

For the custom bolts, Ftu = 220, Fty & Fcy = 200, E = 29.4, e = 12%.
These bolts are corrosion-proof, and require no plating or other 
protection.

Just for fun, I also looked up titanium material to see how it might 
stack up.  The usual alloy for bolts is called Ti-6AL-4V.  It has an 
Ftu = 160, Fty = 150, Fcy = 155, E = 16.0, e = 10%.  It falls in 
between "10.9" and "12.9", except for the "E" of 16.0, which shows 
that it is about half as stiff in terms of bending at a given load.  I 
won't even discuss the 316 CRES bolt option.  With an Fcy = 83, it 
doesn't even belong here.

John H. admitted in post #21251 that his 12.9 bolt was bent.  Others 
have reported bent 10.9 bolts all over the place.  This (to me!) gives 
an idea of the stresses (and loads) involved in this critical joint.  
Without doing an instrumented strain survey (like I do in jet 
aircraft), this is the best way to guess at what the bolts and other 
components need to stand up to.  BTW - For all of you that are 
concerned about brittle fractures of hard bolts, please note that my 
special bolts are more ductile (higher "e" value) than either the 10.9 
or 12.9.  Just thought that I'd throw that in for free.  One other 
thought - how and when the threads are formed in the bolt.  If the 
threads are cut, or ground in, the grain of the material is disturbed, 
and this is an unacceptable situation for any bolt that you are 
concerned about (cut threads are CRAP).  The only acceptable method is 
"rolled threads", which preserves the grain structure.  But ... if the 
threads are rolled in before heat treatment, the fatigue strength 
(resistance to cracking, basically) is as low as 1/3 that of bolts 
with the threads rolled after heat treatment.  The special bolts are 
rolled after ... Does anybody happen to know about this for the stock 
bolts?  I personally wouldn't want to guess.  Well, that is all for 
now.  As always, feedback will be appreciated.

Toby Peterson  VIN 2248
Winged1

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "Walter" <Whalt_at_dml_a...> wrote:

> It would be interesting to know (if you can tell us) what the 
differences are between an 8.8, 10.9 & 12.9 hardness bolt.  




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Message: 6
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 21:46:49 -0500 (EST)
From: Noah <sitz_at_dml_onastick.net>
Subject: Bah, heck, darn it. Angle drive issues.

So, I've got a nice swanky new angle drive all ready for installation. And
I go to remove the angle drive that's on the car and...

..it turns. Suspiciously easily.

Sure enough, it's not turning. Well. It *is*. It's also turning whatever
it is it screws onto, loosening the nut on the other end in the process.
This, needless to say, is hardly the desired effect. The only things that
leap to mind to fix this are:

* disassemble the brake assembly, remove the whole shebang, slap it in a
pair of vice grips and go to town

* immobilize the bolt (axle? "threaded metal thingy"? I feel so technical
all of a sudden.) somehow, and go to work on the angle drive.

Suggestions as to which would be easier? Suggestions for things I haven't
thought of? Suggestions for ways to accomplish either of the above?


Noah "So close, dammit" Robin





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Message: 7
Date: Thu, 15 Nov 2001 22:07:56 EST
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: More Sunstar Doorl Woes...

My wife bought me a stainless watch last year that has simulated door 
pistons. Actually there is a spring where the torsion bar would be, but you 
would think it's the pistons. It's called the machine watch from the Edge 
Company.The pistons are about 1" and look real.
John
  



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Message: 8
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 03:51:35 -0000
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Trailing arm bolts 12.9

Group, I posted today information on the 12.9 bolts. These are German 
made and the best commercial you could probably buy. I am having them 
doulble plated to help protect more against the salt water spray. You 
can read about them on the web site.
John hervey
 http://www.specialtauto.com/hightemp.shtml




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Message: 9
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 05:33:57 -0000
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com
Subject: Re: Broken Muffler Bracket.

Come next paycheck, I'll be ordering a new bracket. I was just 
thinking about the welding as a temporary fix untill that time. for 
now the strap is good enough.

In the end, the DeLorean really isn't all that of an expensive car to 
own. Especially when you compare it to a regular car payment. 
For an average car payment of $300-$350, I can sink that cash 
back into my D. One month can get me an upgraded alternator, 
In about 4 months, that could equal a completly new brake 
system (master cylinder, brake booster, brake hoses & 4 
refurbished calipers). Or a new suspension kit., A/C system, 
etc...

And when you go by this formula, one month's "payment" could 
pretty much fix just about anything that may pop up.

Just wanted to send out thanks to everyone who sent back 
responses for my original problem. And to present a flipside to 
affordability and the "$20K" rule. DeLorean or a new car, you're 
going to hit that same amount anyways, so you might as well 
just go for the fun car!

-Robert
vin 6585 "X"




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Message: 10
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 06:52:56 -0600
From: "Scott Mueller" <scott.a.mueller_at_dml_worldnet.att.net>
Subject: RE: Fuel Pump Glitch

Perhaps the check valve is not holding.

Scott Mueller
DMCNEWS 002981
DOA 5031

-----Original Message-----
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com [mailto:dherv10_at_dml_aol.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 14, 2001 10:40 PM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [DML] Fuel Pump Glitch


Group. I had my first today. Had a call from a customer that was having
fuelling problems. Come to find out that the pump had to be primed before it
would pick up the gas. I have heard of a lot of things, but this was the
first. I'm checking with Bosch to see what might be the problem. Is this a
sign of the pump beginning to fail.
John hervey




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Message: 11
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 14:39:17 -0000
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com
Subject: Re: More Sunstar Model Woes...How to fix your Woes

I can't  believe that we now have insturctions for "Door Tortion 
adjustments" for a model car. It just goes to show that this list 
truly is the end all, be all hub for everything DeLorean realated!

How many other specialty car owners can say that they have 
THIS much support for their marque!

-Robert
vin 6585 "X"

p.s. Heaven help us if one day hover conversions become a 
reality! ;-p



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., CBL302_at_dml_m... wrote:
> Jeff,
> Like you my passenger door too also,did not stay up on my 1/
18 
> model,so what I did was to disassemble my Delorean 
Model,there are 
> eight screws on the bottom side of the model...
<SNIP>




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Message: 12
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 15:26:13 -0000
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com
Subject: Re: Reverse Light Switch.

Robert,
Pulling the reverse light switch should not cause you loose trans oil.
If you replaced the switch with something other than  the Delorean 
part number(106332)can you tell me the cross reference number and 
manufacturer you used?
Thanks,
Jim




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Message: 13
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 10:14:30 -0800
From: "Adam Price" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Removing dome light...

How do I remove the dome light above the dash without damaging the light, 
ceiling apolstery, etc?

thanks, Adam

_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp




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Message: 14
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 18:21:55 -0000
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com
Subject: Reverse Switch Backup Light Cross Reference

Does anyone have a manufacturer and part number cross ref for the 5 
speed manual backup light reverse switch (oem # 106332 )?
I'd like to get one locally to install this weekend?
Thanks,
Jim
06147




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Message: 15
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2001 11:07:20 +0000
From: Les Huckins <jhuckins_at_dml_cybersurfers.net>
Subject: Re: Leatherique

Yes, made it more supple, it was trying to crack and getting stiff.  Go to
www.leatherique.com, I think that's the page, there's a nice write-up and some club
endorsements.

Les

Joe Thome wrote:

> Less,
> I ordered some Leatherique but stopped short of using it because of not
> being sure I wanted to follow the part of the instructions where it says to
> "Park the car in the sun with the windows rolled up to create a steam room
> for as long as practical, several hour or a day." Did you follow that part
> of the instructions and if so did you see any adverse effect on any other
> part of the car's interior?

> Joe Thome



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Message: 16
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 23:45:02 -0800
From: Les Huckins <jhuckins_at_dml_cybersurfers.net>
Subject: Re: Leatherique

Sorry didn't notice this was going to the group, plus that, the answer doesn't exactly
match the question..  Yes, I did follow instructions, the car should be in the sun for
perhaps an afternoon to give the treatment time to soak in.  It should then be wiped down
and cleaner applied, then that wiped down.  Treatment should be repeated perhaps twice a
year, more if your leather is in really bad condition.  I encountered no adverse
effects.  Go to the site and see what the experts say.

Les Huckins wrote:

> Yes, made it more supple, it was trying to crack and getting stiff.  Go to
> www.leatherique.com, I think that's the page, there's a nice write-up and some club
> endorsements.
>
> Les



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Message: 17
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 15:06:50 -0500
From: "Ed Garbade" <edgarbade_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: Leatherique

Would appreciate an experienced (with Leatherique) person's input on this.

Does this stuff come off on your hands or clothes?
Make the wheel or seats slippery?
Out-gas to mess up your windows?

That's why I don't use Armor-All.  It looks nice but it's way to messy.

Ed
10541

>Aside from the smell of leather you are now enjoying, did using Leatherique 
>improve the appearace and feel of the leather itself?


_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp




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Message: 18
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 14:28:56 -0600
From: "Gabriel H. Prado" <gprado_at_dml_josephreina.com>
Subject: watch

I saw that watch on a Delorean web site, but can't find it now.

any clues?

Gabe




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Message: 19
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 20:35:47 -0000
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net
Subject: Re: TA Bolt questions

I think you have done an excellant job of research on the TAB. The 
Delorean community couldn't afford to spend $$$ on this kind of 
expertise but we can all appreciate the effort. I think your bolts are 
well worth installing for anyone who has any doubts about the bolts 
they currently have installed or the "pedegree" of any they might 
purchess. One comment I must include. If your TAB is bent then your 
thrust angle (rear alignment) is OFF. You cannot have the wheel 
pointed in the right direction if the bolt is bent. Once a bolt bends 
it is now WEAKER than it was and a lower level of stress could now 
fracture it. If the stress was high enough to bend it in the first 
place it isn't too hard to consider that it could happen again but 
this time it snaps. Perhaps we should consider these old bolts "time 
lifed" at 10 years or some other # and just issue a volontary recall? 
There could also be an annual inspection of the bolts for corrosion 
and bending added to the normal inspection and maintaince. In aircraft 
when there is a critical fastener ( and there are many) they inspect 
them and replace them at so many hours of operation.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757




--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., tobyp_at_dml_k... wrote:
> Hello List -- This is a reply to a request for technical comparisons 
> of different types of bolts.



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Message: 20
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 20:38:45 -0000
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com
Subject: Re: Reverse Light Switch.

To be safe on the oil side, I place a single ramp under the rear 
drivers side tire, and backed the car up. No oil loss at all! The 
suspension was flexable enough to handle the incline. The front 
passenger side wheel never came in contact with the fender. 
Installation is simple. Shift into any gear but reverse, unscrew 
the old switch, screw the new one in, and reconnect the wires & 
the rubber boot. Just takes a little patience/strength remove the 
bolt _at_dml_ the awkward angle (depending upon how you position 
yourself under the car).

As far as I know, there is no crossover part for this switch. I 
believe that this switch is unique to the Renault R30 gearbox. I 
picked up my switch from DMC Houston. Price isn't a problem, 
It's just the wait for it to arrive :)

-Robert
vin 6585 "X"



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., jwit6_at_dml_c... wrote:
> Robert,
> Pulling the reverse light switch should not cause you loose 
trans oil.
> If you replaced the switch with something other than  the 
Delorean 
> part number(106332)can you tell me the cross reference 
number and 
> manufacturer you used?
> Thanks,
> Jim




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Message: 21
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 21:45:00 -0000
From: DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com
Subject: Re: TA Bolt questions

Well, if you want a safety device for the trailing arms, that 
shouldn't be a problem. You could mount a bracket onto the 
trailing arm, and a second onto the chassis. Then connect them 
both with some high tensile chain. The chain could be coated in 
either rubber, or plastic to keep it stiff, and from rattling when 
driving. Steel cable could also be a possibility, but would be a 
pain to strap into place.

I'll be honest though. This seems to be overkill if you're going to 
install the improved bolts. But it is an idea if you want to go all 
the way in fool-proofing the bolt.

-Robert
vin 6585 "X"



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., tobyp_at_dml_k... wrote:
<SNIP>
> The second point I wanted to clarify is in regards to the 
subjects of "fail safety and structural redundancy".  A "fail-safe joint" 



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Message: 22
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 22:53:05 -0000
From: pbmain_at_dml_mindspring.com
Subject: Re: any Ann Arbor, MI owners on the south end?

I'm in Clawson, East of Woodward in Detroit... but I know of a 
Delorean in Saline...it's actually for sale, too... 8k miles, Black 
interior 5 speed.  Definitely not a detailed car, and I passed on it 
since it looked like it may have been out for a couple winter 
drives...came with a set of Rotors for $15,500..

Pete

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., Soma576_at_dml_a... wrote:
> i was talking to a friend on another newsgroup who says there's a 
DeLorean near him in Ann Arbor, Michigan, 'on the south end by the saline'.
> 
> it is someone on the list?
> 
> Andy



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Message: 23
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 19:05:22 EST
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: M9 1.00 bolt?????????

hey guys,

remember when i broke that bolt for my air induction manifold this week?  
well today i had my friend's dad help me - he has a tap and die set.  anyway, 
we drilled it out but it wasn't good enough for a 8M bolt, so we had to drill 
it one more time and tap it for the next size up in his kit - 9M 1.00 (i 
assume 1.00 is the threading).  anyway, that worked well so now i go the 
hardware store for a 9M bolt... uh oh.  turns out there is no such thing as a 
9M bolt?????????????? 
does anyone know where i can get a 9M bolt?  i looked on DMCHouston's online 
parts manual and found that there are two 9M bolts used on the DeLorean - 
they are both listed as "9M X 100-12".  is this the same bolt as what i want? 
 we threaded my 9MM hole the same size threading as what was originally in 
there, but the parts manual simply calls it a 7M screw (the original).

what do i do now?  the place i dropped my manifold off for cleaning said they 
can drill the manifold hole to fit a 10M bolt which is simple to find.  
However, that is making the hole in the left head pretty big and now i'm 
afraid i would be drilling into the water jacket if i make it that big.

what do you guys think i should do?  this sucks!

Andy  

Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


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Message: 24
Date: Sat, 17 Nov 2001 00:08:10 -0000
From: "Jan van de Wouw" <Jan_at_dml_vdWouw.Demon.nl>
Subject: Re: Bah, heck, darn it. Angle drive issues.

> So, I've got a nice swanky new angle drive all ready
> for installation. 
[snip]
> Sure enough, it's not turning. Well. It *is*.
> It's also turning whatever it is it screws onto, 

The angle drive (AD) is NOT screwed into the nut; 
it is held in place by a circular spring inside the nut.
In order to remove the drive from the nut the nut has 
to be removed from the hub/axle.

It's my experience that this is not THAT hard if you disconnect the 
lower speedo cable from the AD and disconnect the tie rod from the 
sterring knuckle. Doing this enables you to swing out the knuckle a
bit further, giving better access to the nut the AD clicks into.

When you have the nut off look inside past the cable that usually
comes through the axle, you'll see the end of the AD with a litle 
spring around it. It's not easy, but using tweezers or a set of small 
screwdrivers you can compress the spring while pulling lightly on the 
AD. Once the spring is pushed in far enough you should be able to 
separate the AD and nut quite easlily.

When you reassemble everything, make sure you torque everything up 
right! The nut that holds the AD also holds the axle in place; not 
toqueing it right COULD result in your wheel falling off of the car!!!

Good Luck,

JAN van de Wouw
Thinking Different...   Using a Mac...
Living the Dream...   Driving a DeLorean...

#05141 "Dagger" since Sept. 2000

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Message: 25
Date: Fri, 16 Nov 2001 19:39:17 -0700
From: Mark Noeltner <mark_at_dml_buffalochips.org>
Subject: TA Bolt discussion

I've been following the discussion on trailing arm bolts with great
interest. Many years ago I studied Mechanical Engineering for a couple of
years before switching to Computer Science and ending up in the computer
industry. With this background I was able to follow Toby's technical
discussion pretty well, although I would be the first to say that there is
no way I could duplicate his work!

His analysis of the bolts really makes a lot of sense. While John Hervey's
12.9 bolt does offer an upgrade over the stock bolt, I really have to go
with the custom bolts that Toby is proposing. I really think that this is a
case of "You Get What You Pay For". And for a $66 one time purchase I
really think the custom bolts are the way to go.

Keep up the great discussions on this list! I love it!

Mark N
VIN 6820



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