From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 829
Date: Saturday, December 15, 2001 12:09 PM

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There are 4 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Was Re: Accumalator now Inertia switch
From: "jtrealtywebspannet" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

2. Re: Accumalator and fuel octane
From: "Adam Price" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>

3. Re: Accumalator
From: "B Benson" <delornut_at_dml_peoplepc.com>

4. Re: torsion bar performance?
From: "tmpintnl" <tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com>





Message: 1
Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 17:56:46 -0000
From: "jtrealtywebspannet" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Was Re: Accumalator now Inertia switch

The inertia switch was located by the lambda counter on the early 
cars. In a recall it was relocated to the area by the bonnet release 
because it was being hit by the driver's feet and being tripped 
inadvertantly. There was also a recall involving replacing "defective" 
or overly sensitive inertia switches. If your switch doesn't have a 
white splotch of paint on it then it may not have been replaced. I 
have also seen where the switches were bypassed. This may be the case 
in your car where not only was it bypassed but also removed. I 
strongly recomend having a working inertia switch because not only 
will it shut off the fuel pump in the event of a serious accident, 
it's other purpose is to unlock the doors. This is important because 
the driver may panic and not unlock the doors before trying to open 
them or (worst case) if the driver is unconcious it allows rescuers to 
remove the occupants quickly and without having to damage the car 
further. Of course this assumes that the central locking system is 
functional. The Delorean venders all carry the "improved" inertia 
switch and can help you with the install. 
 The filter located in the tank is only supposed to keep the "big 
stuff" out of the pump. You really shouldn't try to filter too fine on 
the suction side of a pump. Most in-line filters are supposed to be on 
the pressure side. If the filter inside the tank was very dirty you 
should clean out the tank and replace the filter by the rear wheel. 
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757  




--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_d...> wrote:
> Over here in the UK, standard unleaded is 95 octane and super 
unleaded is 98 octane. I've
> only put standard in my DeLorean so far, and HAVE had bucking 
problems, but traced it to
> a blocked fuel pickup filter. I have now butchered the 
"question-mark" shaped hose and
> inserted an in-line pickup filter, which as of last night when I 
drove 120 miles, works
> beautifully.
> 
> (The reason I put in an in-line filter was because of how cheap and 
easy it is to get
> this particular filter (6), compared to the inferior standard 
pickup filter.)
> 
> To go back to the original point, 95 octane petrol works fine. I 
haven't tried super yet.
> 
> The inertia switch SHOULD be located next to the bonnet release 
handle. I say SHOULD
> because mine's conspicuously absent...
> 
> Martin
> #1458
> 
> Adam Price wrote:
> 
> > My car also began bucking this morning for the first time. Fuel is
> > completely full and voltage levels normal. I put premium gas in it 
for the
> > first time since I;ve owned it. I know these engines are rated for 
91
> > octane, but premium is 92. Could this adversely affect the engine
> > performance?
> >
> > Where is the inertia switch?
> >
> > Adam




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Message: 2
Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 08:42:44 -0800
From: "Adam Price" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: Accumalator and fuel octane


I think that my car actually runs better with the lower octane gas in it. 
Also my car ran completely normal all day today and I didnt adjust anything. 
I dont know what caused the bucking yesterday.

Adam

>From: "Tom Niemczewski" <tomciodmc_at_dml_poczta.onet.pl>
>Reply-To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
>To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
>Subject: Re: [DML] Accumalator
>Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 01:59:37 +0100
>
>Adam and anyone else,
>You are wrong on the octane subject. Remember that the car was made in
>Europe and the specs for the engine are based on European standards. The 
>are
>two different methods for the octane rating. That 91 refers to the 
>"research
>method" which is used in Europe and it equals to about 86 using the "R+M/2
>method" used in US.
>If you go to ANY gas station in US there is a yellow sticker on the pump
>that has the octane rating and method for that rating. In US it is R+M/2
>method.
>So, for all you guys in US - the DeLorean engine is rated for 86 octane gas
>and it really doesn't do much good to use the more expensive premium (well,
>maybe for the owner of the gas station it does). It's just more expensive.
>On the other hand, if your car seems to run bad on the 87 octane gas it
>means that it might need a tune-up because there is something wrong going
>on.
>I always use 87 gas in my D and it always starts at the touch of the key 
>and
>runs beautifully.
>
>
>Take care everyone!
>Tom Niemczewski
>tomciodmc_at_dml_poczta.onet.pl - tomciodmc'AT'poczta.onet.pl
>VIN 6298 (FOR SALE)
>
>
>
>----- Original Message -----
>From: "Adam Price" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>
>
><SNIP>
> > I put premium gas in it for the
> > first time since I;ve owned it. I know these engines are rated for 91
> > octane, but premium is 92. Could this adversely affect the engine
> > performance?
> >
> > Adam
>
>
>
>
>--
>
>Tego nie znajdziesz w zadnym sklepie!
>[ http://oferty.onet.pl ]
>
>
>
>To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
>moderator_at_dml_dmcnews.com
>
>To search the archives or view files, log in at 
>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
>
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>
>




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Message: 3
Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 17:34:50 -0600
From: "B Benson" <delornut_at_dml_peoplepc.com>
Subject: Re: Accumalator

If an engine is designed to use 86 octane that's what you should use. Higher
octane fuels are blended to combust at a slower pace while lower octane
fuels burn much faster. This is opposite of what many may think. If you use
the higher octane fuel the slower combustion can, over a long period of
time, produce carbon deposits in the combustion chamber which raise the
compression ratio. Higher compression ratios require higher octane, slower
burning fuels. Therefore it's possible that your car can develop a
dependency for high octane at some point. The slow burn of high octanes is
necessary for turbo cars because the slower burn helps retard detonation
which is when combustion takes place too early and catches the piston still
trying to finish the compression cycle while the combustion is trying to
drive it back down. The higher intake temperatures that come with turbo
charging create that situation. The bottom line is you're wasting money
using higher octane fuel if your engine wasn't designed for it.

Bruce Benson

> So, for all you guys in US - the DeLorean engine is rated for 86 octane
gas
> and it really doesn't do much good to use the more expensive premium
(well,
> maybe for the owner of the gas station it does). It's just more expensive.
> On the other hand, if your car seems to run bad on the 87 octane gas it
> means that it might need a tune-up because there is something wrong going
> on.
> I always use 87 gas in my D and it always starts at the touch of the key
and
> runs beautifully.
>
>
> Take care everyone!
> Tom Niemczewski





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Message: 4
Date: Fri, 14 Dec 2001 21:32:43 -0000
From: "tmpintnl" <tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com>
Subject: Re: torsion bar performance?

I'm not sure that I fully understand the comment about "your doors 
latching now that it's cooled down", but...

The torsion bars would not be affected by the normal range of 
temperatures that we experience.  They are cryogenically tempered at 
-230 degrees F, and aged at +780 degrees F, so the steel wouldn't even 
notice a temperature change to 40 degrees F.  I'm sure that everybody 
on the list will recommend that you change out your "bad struts" for 
some fresh ones, and then adjust the torsion bars for minimum stress, 
and optimum balance.  "Lower stress equals longer life" is just as 
true in steel as it is in living your life.

Toby Peterson  VIN 2248
Winged1 


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "K Creason" <dmc4687_at_dml_m...> wrote:
> Do our torsion bars work better warm vs. cold?
> 
> I know the struts do... but my doors will latch with my bad struts 
now that it has cooled down to 40ish.
 





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