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To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 1124
Date: Monday, July 22, 2002 8:51 AM

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There are 10 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Transmission and Oil question
From: "jtrealtywebspannet" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

2. Re: Driver Door lights
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

3. Re: Air conditioning
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

4. Re: Stainless Steel Question?
From: Todd Masinelli <tmasin_at_dml_madisontelco.com>

5. Re: Re: Doors
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

6. Re: Stainless Steel Question?
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

7. Re: Air conditioning
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

8. Re: Transmission and Oil question
From: "vin4258" <vin4258_at_dml_delorean.com>

9. Transmission change
From: "foxmul2001" <foxmul_at_dml_bellatlantic.net>

10. Re: Transmission and Oil question
From: "dmcjohn" <john.dore_at_dml_fidelity.com>





Message: 1
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2002 20:45:35 -0000
From: "jtrealtywebspannet" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Transmission and Oil question

If you aren't going to be using the car much synthetic is way too 
expensive and really not necessarry. I reccomend changing the oil and 
filter every year or 5000 miles. Use a good quality premium brand. 
Refer to Workshop Manual A:05:01 for the viscosity. I think 15w-40 is 
what you should be using for the engine.
 Only use Dexron ATF in the automatic trans. The latest version is 
called Dexron-Mercon ATF and is usable in all GM and Ford automatic 
transmissions.
 Don't forget that the final drive has it's own separate gear oil, SAE 
80. If it is really hot you could also stick in 90W.
 Refer to owner's manual and you will see that the brakes  are 
supposed to be flushed every 2 years. Only use Castrol GTLMA DOT 4. Be 
warned if it was never done then this may cause the system to leak 
requiring rebuilding the calipers and replacing the master cylinder.
 Most auto makers do not recomend the use of ANY additives. In general 
the additive packages already in the oils are all that is needed and 
what gets them approved. In many cases the oil doesn't need to be 
changed except for the fact that the additive packages have worn out. 
Same goes for the Anti-Freeze. Trying to rejuvenate the oil or 
anti-freeze by adding additives doesn't work, it is more economical to 
replace. Always dispose of old fluids properly. Try never to spill 
anti-freeze where animals can lick at it, it will kill them.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "iqmpike" <iqmpike_at_dml_y...> wrote:
> Quick question for the group... I have heard MANY storied on what 
> kind of oil to put in the Delorean.. I have heard 10W50, 5W30, 
etc...
> 
> I went and bought 7 quarts of Penzoil 5W30 SYNTHETIC oil....
> 
> My car has 5300 miles on it.
> 
> Is synthetic OK to put in a delorean, or is regular oil better?



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Message: 2
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2002 18:30:52 -0400
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Driver Door lights

Scott,

I agree with John.  Most likely you have a short to ground.  Where I would
start looking for it is inside the door particularly in two places:
1) Where the main wiring harness comes though under the window.
2) Where the end of the harness heads south to the window regulator motor.

At the first place, the factory installs a piece of foam that turns to
powder with age.  The idea with it is to protect the wires from the sharp
edges of the stainless.  Replace the factory foam with a piece of foam water
pipe insulation (3/8" ID) and file the sharp edges down.

At the second place, this is where the electrical connection is to the door
lights & window regulator.  I've seen a problem at this spot on a friend's
DeLorean where the sharp edges of the stainless cut through one of the wires
going to the window motor.  By the time I noticed it, the wire was half
burnt through.  (I was in the door fixing an unrelated problem.)  In your
case, all you need is a path to ground to make the lights stay on, and the
short could very well be here.

Walt




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Message: 3
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2002 18:32:48 -0400
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Air conditioning

> When you are driving, however, cool air flows nicely but
> when you accelerate, the cool air becomes warmer, and when you
> decelerate the air goes cool again.

I'm mostly just book smart on this subject with little practical experience,
so take my advice with a grain of salt:

When the air from your vents gets warmer, are you sure this is the case?  Or
are you just losing air flow from your center vents ?  (The door vents would
still be blowing cold air.)  This indicates a vacuum leak going to your mode
switch.  (This happened on my car.)

Another possibility is the following scenario:  You are running your a/c on
MAX with the heater control turned counter-clockwise (or the cable from this
control is broke).  By having the mode selector switch on MAX, it will send
a vacuum signal to the heater water control valve shutting off coolant flow
through your heater core UNLESS you have a vacuum leak in this circuit.
Upon acceleration, the decreased vacuum will allow this valve to open.  Hot
water circulates through the heater core neutralizing your a/c.  To test
this theory, run your a/c on NORM and see if the cooling ability is notably
diminished.

Another possibility is that you have moisture contaminating your
refrigerant, and this is periodically freezing up your orifice tube.  Under
acceleration, your higher engine RPMs are going to run your a/c compressor
that much faster increasing refrigerant pressure which will exaggerate the
effect.  (In theory, but I could be wrong.)

Hooking up a set of manifold gauges could tell you a lot.  But it is hard to
use while your car is accelerating.  :-)  Mechanics either use a big fan to
force air through the condenser or sprinkle it with water.  This makes the
condenser work at higher efficiency to simulate driving at highway speeds.

If this is over your head, have a mechanic hook up a gauge set and tell him
the system is set up like a General Motors Cycling Clutch Orifice Tube
system (CCOT).

Walt




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Message: 4
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2002 18:13:54 -0500
From: Todd Masinelli <tmasin_at_dml_madisontelco.com>
Subject: Re: Stainless Steel Question?

> What I'm looking for is an amazing
> shine with little or no residue.

Then don't use polish.  :-)

I used to use the 3M polish, and when I ran out of it I tried Stainless
Steel Magic for a while.  Products like that will make the car look shiny,
but at the expense of filling in the grain with goop and providing a nice
sticky surface for dust to cling to.  "Bare" stainless looks great, is less
of a hassle to maintain, and easily sheds off any dust that might settle on
it.

Check out Walt's post on this topic from February 2002 (message 23075).  It
was that post that prompted me to clean all the polish off my car and
carefully regrain the stainless with an 80 grit sanding sponge and a
blending pad.  The results were fantastic.  The order in which I cleaned the
panels resulted in a bare fender next to a polished hood.  The difference
was like night and day -- it looked like I had just bought a brand new
fender and stuck it on the car.  It wasn't just that my stainless needed to
be regrained or that the car was dirty (I had regrained pretty recently and
had just washed the car the day before).  It was a matter of getting all the
gunk out of the grain so it could shine properly.

Just put forth the initial investment of time and elbow grease and I'll
think you'll be pleased with the results.  And if not, you can always go
back to polishing!

_________________
Todd Masinelli
VIN 6681 (Nov 81)




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Message: 5
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2002 18:34:14 -0400
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Re: Doors

> My door DOES need a bit of alignment, but this is something
> I do not trust myself on doing.

Jan,

I learned from my car's previous owner's mistakes that you cannot adjust the
door hinge without loosening the torsion bar.  Unless something in the hinge
mount has shifted since originally assembled, this shouldn't need to be
messed with.  If you loosen any of the bolts holding the hinge/door
together, the torque on the torsion bar will prevent you from putting it
back where it needs to be.  Unless of course you use brute force and dent
the T-panel and the top of your door like was done to mine.

Until I fixed my hinge problem, striker pin adjustments were not very
productive.  The front hinge was loose and caused the front of the door to
hit early.  If you have a problem like this, then yes, you have a difficult
situation.  But if the hinges are adjusted properly, don't fear doing a
striker pin adjustment on your own.  For "training wheels" I put a piece of
tape over the striker pin to see which side it was hitting on.  Since then I
learned to tell by feel.  My problem now is keeping the striker pins from
shifting.  The plastic panel goes under mine, and this makes the pin less
stable.  Later production cars have a whole cut though the panel so this
isn't a problem.  I might eventually make this change to my car.

Walt




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Message: 6
Date: Sun, 21 Jul 2002 18:35:43 -0400
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Stainless Steel Question?

> Also, has anyone on here used a motorized soft buffer to get more shine,
if so what were the effects?

I've seen a DeLorean that has had this done, and the result was a disaster.
The whole car needs to be regrained.  What happens is that the orbital
motion of the buffer polishes a swirl pattern into what should be a straight
scratch/grain pattern.  Our car's finish is meant to be a pattern of short
straight randomly-spaced scratches.  Any polishing is counter-productive.

> What I'm looking for is an amazing shine with little or no residue.

What you are going to find is a lot of work and trouble for yourself.
Stainless steel when left to aerate naturally will from a protective layer
of oxidation on the surface.  This will dull the metal to a small degree.
If you polish it all off then you will have a bright "unnatural" beautiful
finish until the natural layer of oxidation reforms.

Stainless steel polishes are made to work in two ways:
1) They remove oxidation by either a chemical and/or abrasive means.
2) They leave a protective layer of residue to prevent the metal from
reforming the natural protective layer of oxidation.  That might be fine on
kitchen appliances, but on DeLoreans it attracts dirt.

Walt    Tampa, FL




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Message: 7
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 03:49:46 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: Air conditioning

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "Graham WELLS" <gwells_at_dml_c...> wrote:

Have you put a gauge on it immediately after movement at speed?

Freon condenses much faster as air flow increases over the condensor.
This actually LOWERS pressure in the evaporator. That's one reason I
drive a car before adding that last can of freon (and why I don't rely
on gauge readings in the driveway).

Remember: with A/C everything's backwards. 

Bill Robertson
#5939

> I thought at first that it might be
> a vacuum problem, i.e. when accelerating, vacuum obviously decreases,
> and if there were a leak then it might have an effect on the flap
> positions. However it appears to be more related to vehicle movement.
> Might it need regassing? It cycles regularily as one would expect with
> no indications of being low in gas.
> Any ideas?
> 
> Graham Wells
> VIN 17152




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Message: 8
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 06:52:15 -0000
From: "vin4258" <vin4258_at_dml_delorean.com>
Subject: Re: Transmission and Oil question

The owners manual says to only use 10W30 when the temperature is 
lower than 10 degrees or something (really low).  At any other 
temperature ESPECIALLY in hot places like where you live you need to 
put a thicker oil in.  The manual says 20W40 (rare) or 20W50.  Most 
european engines use a thicker oil, and I wouldn't put 10W or 5W 
anything in a DeLorean




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Message: 9
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 11:22:49 -0000
From: "foxmul2001" <foxmul_at_dml_bellatlantic.net>
Subject: Transmission change

 Hey List,

I was wondering if anyone has any experience or heard of anyone 
changing their transmission from Manual to automatic or auto to 
manual?  Is this possible?

thanks,

joseph
vin 2850




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Message: 10
Date: Mon, 22 Jul 2002 13:16:21 -0000
From: "dmcjohn" <john.dore_at_dml_fidelity.com>
Subject: Re: Transmission and Oil question

Hi guys,
I use Valvoline 20 w 50 fully synthetic, every 3000 miles, which in 
my case is about every 5 weeks. It comes out looking brand new every 
time, am I changing it too often? I probably am, but my DeLorean 
deserves a little bit of special treatment!
John, VIN #3810.

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "iqmpike" <iqmpike_at_dml_y...> wrote:
> Quick question for the group... I have heard MANY storied on what 
> kind of oil to put in the Delorean.. I have heard 10W50, 5W30, 
etc...
> 
> I went and bought 7 quarts of Penzoil 5W30 SYNTHETIC oil....
> 
> My car has 5300 miles on it.
> 
> Is synthetic OK to put in a delorean, or is regular oil better?



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