From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 1140
Date: Friday, August 02, 2002 4:47 AM

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There are 6 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. RE: Re: Fire damaged panel refurbishing
From: "Scott Mueller" <scott.a.mueller_at_dml_att.net>

2. Re: [DMCForum] Chock one up for the heat
From: BondAtomic_at_dml_aol.com

3. lighted door key on early cars...
From: "dmcjohn" <john.dore_at_dml_fidelity.com>

4. Re: Re: Brake Calipers, Tie Rod ends, Electrical Parts Source
From: Josh Keady <joshkeady_at_dml_mac.com>

5. Re: Re: Brake Calipers, Tie Rod ends, Electrical Parts Source
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com

6. Re: Brake Calipers, Tie Rod ends, Electrical Parts Source
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com





Message: 1
Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 10:50:12 -0500
From: "Scott Mueller" <scott.a.mueller_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: RE: Re: Fire damaged panel refurbishing

Rich, Why not give the details for your panel refurbishing techniques on the
list.  Share your knowledge with the rest of us.

Scott Mueller
002981
DOA 5031


-----Original Message-----
From: d_rex_2002 [mailto:rich_at_dml_outernet-tech.net]
Sent: Wednesday, July 31, 2002 3:25 PM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: [DML] Re: Fire damaged panel refurbishing


> Erik,
>
> I have had some experience with refurbishing burned SS panels.
> The most important issues are how hot did the fire get, what is the
> 'color' of the discoloration and how much is the panel warped?
> Fenders are the easiest to refurbish, then the T-panel, then the doors
> and last the hood (primarily because it is such a large, flat area).

[long quote trimmed by moderator]



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Message: 2
Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 14:05:22 EDT
From: BondAtomic_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: [DMCForum] Chock one up for the heat

Yes, the electrical system on the DMC is stock, and it still has the blue 
relay. Basically, it works like this:
The light would turn on and off, and when on you could hear the fan(s). When 
the light was off, there was no fan noise. Now, after the overheat and such, 
the light doesn't come on at all, and the DeLorean overheats if not going 
more than 40 or so MPH. 
So this is what I gather I should do:
Buy Fanzilla and buy the Overheat Protector. The new Fanzillas-they take the 
place of the original blue relay and works from there?

Thanks
John
4275


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 3
Date: Thu, 01 Aug 2002 18:29:22 -0000
From: "dmcjohn" <john.dore_at_dml_fidelity.com>
Subject: lighted door key on early cars...

Hi lads,
My DeLorean (VIN 3810 - September 1981) has the 2 key system, and the 
door key is the one you push the button in its center and a little 
bulb lights up. Unfortunately I'm missing all the mechanisms that go 
inside this key to make it work, everything from the bulb to the 
button. Does anybody have these parts or know where I can get them? 
All I have is a big chunky key with a hole in the middle!
Thanks,
John Dore, Boston. 




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Message: 4
Date: Thu, 01 Aug 2002 11:44:31 -0700
From: Josh Keady <joshkeady_at_dml_mac.com>
Subject: Re: Re: Brake Calipers, Tie Rod ends, Electrical Parts Source

I think you're thinking of a proportioning valve, and they're used on many
more cars than just the "computer controlled" other wise, you'd be getting
the rear wheels locking up all of the time.  Under even moderate breaking a
lot of weight is shifted off of the rear and on to the front.  If equal
pressure is delivered to all four brakes (simultaneously even... some
proportioning valves include a fraction-of-a-second delay) it will result in
the rear wheels locking in the most awkward of manners.

Granted, the Delorean rear-end has some, um, ballast, and I'm not sure how
its system is proportioned front-rear, but I can assure you that many cars
(especially light, FWD configurations) get proportioned regardless of
whether or not they have computer intervention.

Josh Keady
(no D, but I like cars...)
http://www.wizzards.net/keady/

on 7/31/02 6:40 PM, basfe25 at dmcman73_at_dml_hotmail.com wrote:

snip
> Pressure 
> regulators are used on computer controlled brake systems...not fully
> manual ones like the Delorean.
> 
snip




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Message: 5
Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 16:44:00 EDT
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com
Subject: Re: Re: Brake Calipers, Tie Rod ends, Electrical Parts Source

In a message dated 8/1/02 11:37:02 AM Eastern Daylight Time, 
dmcman73_at_dml_hotmail.com writes:

<< HUH? The front and Rear calipers are already on separate lines. They 
 do not have a common pipe. One pipe for the two front calipers goes 
 to one port of the brake Master Cylinder and the other pipe for the 
 rear calipers goes to another port on the Master Cylinders. The 
 ports on the Master Cylinders are already their own entity (separate 
 from one another). >>

I think the issue is this. Brakes transform inertia into heat. The more 
efficient the materials used to create heat from inertia, and transfer that 
heat to the atmosphere, the more efficient the brake. And the more efficient 
the brake, the less energy (pedal pressure) required to provide the same 
braking power. So highly efficient front rotors and calipers, used with stock 
rears,  could create a situation where the front/rear braking efficiency 
balance is upset, and the fronts could lock up way ahead of the rears. So 
you'd want to lower the PSI to the fronts, relative to the rears in order to 
take advantage of thier higher efficiency, (Better feel, and no fade.), and 
still maintain a reasonable balance.....Just my opinion but it makes sense to 
me. 
Jim 6147 



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Message: 6
Date: Thu, 1 Aug 2002 16:52:53 EDT
From: jwit6_at_dml_cs.com
Subject: Re: Brake Calipers, Tie Rod ends, Electrical Parts Source

For what it's worth,
Looks like the front DMC-12 rotors are from a Jag Sovereign series 1,2 and 3, 
1968 - 82 rears. Also on the Double Six 82-86 rear.

My orig DMC rotors hand measured:
 254 mm dia, 24 mm height, 12.5 mm thich, 70 mm dia center hole, 4 bolt
The Jags show:
 262 mm dia, 25.5 mm height,  12.5 mm thick, 70 mm dia center hole, 4 bolt
Specs came from www.dba.com.au Their #75 rotor.
Probably close enough. No spec on bolt hole diameter or spacing.

Jim 6147



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