From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 988
Date: Monday, April 15, 2002 9:44 PM

To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
moderator_at_dml_dmcnews.com

To search the archives or view files, log in at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews

There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>

2. Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

3. RE: Snap on number of oil drain tool.
From: "Marc A. Levy" <malevy_at_dml_paramanet.com>

4. RE: Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits
From: "Marc A. Levy" <malevy_at_dml_paramanet.com>

5. CAR Show Raddison Reservations
From: kkoncelik_at_dml_aol.com

6. Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...
From: DHughes030_at_dml_aol.com

7. Re: Snap on number of oil drain tool.
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

8. Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits
From: "Stragand, Dave" <dave.stragand_at_dml_ketchum.com>

9. seat backs
From: "K Creason" <dmc4687_at_dml_mindspring.com>

10. Re: Re: Pressure (was Vacuum) brake bleeding
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

11. Hood w/lines 4 sale!
From: "Stian Birkeland" <delorean_at_dml_online.no>

12. Re: Snap on number of oil drain tool.
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

13. Re: Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits
From: jrc2905_at_dml_aol.com

14. DeLorean Car Show Update
From: kkoncelik_at_dml_aol.com

15. oil drain plug
From: "Marvin" <marv_at_dml_printeddrinkware.com>

16. Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits
From: "jtrealtywebspannet" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

17. Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

18. Re: seat backs
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

19. Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...
From: "cdrugly" <tgoodwin_at_dml_vantagep.com>

20. Re: oil drain plug
From: Mark Noeltner <mark_at_dml_buffalochips.org>

21. Pressure Bleeder
From: "Scott Mueller" <scott.a.mueller_at_dml_att.net>

22. auto transmission pan gasket
From: "Adam Price" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>

23. Parking Brake Cable Replacment Help
From: "shainbrannan" <shain_at_dml_elecmods.com>

24. The Resurrection of Vixen Continues...
From: "Stragand, Dave" <dave.stragand_at_dml_ketchum.com>

25. Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com





Message: 1
Date: Sun, 14 Apr 2002 23:21:20 -0400
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...

Yes; this may be part of you sluggish acceleration problem. Information on
this circuit is located at D:08:01 in the workshop manual. Actually if the
connection to the solenoid is disconnected i.e.: vacuum at the distributor,
you would have good acceleration with poor idle.

DMC Joe
Tech Information, DMC Joe Help Club, & Store
"Summer Parts Sale"
http://shopping.oraclesmallbusiness.com/dsvstore
DeLorean Website Directory www.dmc.tv

----- Original Message -----
From: "cdrugly" <tgoodwin_at_dml_vantagep.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2002 11:52 AM
Subject: [DML] Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...


> Alright. I did the tune up. New plugs, new rotor, new cap, new
> wires... the whole shebang. Timing is good and my cold cranking is
> excellent. Sitting in park, the engine purrs like a kitten.
>
> (Now the dreaded) However, performance became sluggish under load. On
> the road, there's poor acceleration in all gears. The only thing I
> can see that went awry during the whole process was a broken
> electrical connection in the vacuum solenoid. I can't find any
> information on this connection so I have no idea what it does or how
> it affect vacuum advance.
>
> Question is, could this cause the sluggish acceleration?
>
> If not, can anyone offer up some suggestions?
>
> Travis






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Message: 2
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 09:12:04 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...

In a message dated 4/14/02 6:00:02 PM Central Daylight Time, 
tgoodwin_at_dml_vantagep.com writes:


> If not, can anyone offer up some suggestions?
> 
> Travis

Where did you get your parts, and what plugs did you use?

Andy

Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 3
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 08:35:23 -0400
From: "Marc A. Levy" <malevy_at_dml_paramanet.com>
Subject: RE: Snap on number of oil drain tool.

That replacement drain plug is not much help if I still need to get the stock one off!!

BTW, I found that putting a 9mm closed end wrench over the 8MM square end (on the side I did not snap off!) in paralell with the shaft of the home-made tool gave it enough strenght to get the plug out.


> -----Original Message-----
> From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com [mailto:dherv10_at_dml_aol.com]
> Sent: Saturday, April 13, 2002 11:48 PM
> To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
> Subject: Re: [DML] Snap on number of oil drain tool.
> 
> 
> Marc, Take a look at the replacement oil drain plug which 
> doesn't require any 
> special tools. Bottom of the engine page. $12.95
> John Hervey
> http://www.specialtauto.com/engine.shtml
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
> moderator_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at 
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> 
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to 
> http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ 
> 
> 
> 



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Message: 4
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 08:31:45 -0400
From: "Marc A. Levy" <malevy_at_dml_paramanet.com>
Subject: RE: Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits

The hand vac pumps do not work all that well.  There is a compressor powered version that I have used (I do not own it) that does work very well.  The hand pump does not create enough suction to do the job.

Also, The process described  below would seem to just get the air out of the last inch or so of line.  If you are pulling the fluid back in from the jar, then you are not forcing fresh fluid from the master cyliner.  No only are you not "changing" the fluid (which you should do!), but any air trapped further up the system will not be removed.


> -----Original Message-----
> From: dmcman82 [mailto:dmcman73_at_dml_hotmail.com]
> Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2002 10:15 AM
> To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [DML] Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits
> 
> 
> I've used them before and they generally work well. I still favor a 
> cheaper one man bleed technique which consists of a glass jar, some 
> length of rubber tubing and brake fluid. One end of the rubber tube 
> is fitted over the bleed screw and the other end is inserted into 
> the glass jar that is filled half way with brake fluid. Open up the 
> bleed screw, get in the car and slowly pump the brakes. As you press 
> down on the peddle, air and fluid is expelled into teh jar, as you 
> lift off the peddle brake fluid (not air) is drawn into the caliper. 
> After doing it a few times close the bleed screw and move to the 
> next one. I try to get someone to help me just to watch the jar for 
> bubbles. I tell them to let me know when the bubbles stop as I press 
> the peddle and then I close up the bleed screw.
> 
> There is a method to bleeding the brakes though, like bleed the 
> front left then move to the rear right and so on (not the exact way) 
> I can't remember the sequence and I'll have to look it up...maybe 
> someone on this list knows? It may not be important to follow but I 
> try to follow it when I need to do it.
> 
> Steve
> 
> --- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "Hank Eskin" <heskin_at_dml_b...> wrote:
> > 
> > Hello All,
> > 
> >   I need to bleed my brakes, and today I picked up a $25 vacuum
> > pump/one-person-brake-bleeding kit at Autozone.  What are peoples' 
> opinions
> > about these type of kits, do they do the same job as a traditional 
> two-man
> > brake bleeding procedure, and is there anything I should look out 
> for when
> > using this kit?
> > 
> > Thanks,
> > 
> > -Hank Eskin #1619
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
> moderator_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ 





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Message: 5
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 09:34:26 EDT
From: kkoncelik_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: CAR Show Raddison Reservations

If you are at the Raddison could you please e-mail me just stating that you 
are there.
There are a few people that have booked the downtown Raddison I'm trying to 
find them.
Also I have to arrange someone to be at the Raddison to hand out packets so 
this would help me since the list is changing daily
If you plan to be at the Raddison and are not currently registered you can 
drop me a line also.

Thanks 
Ken


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 6
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 00:17:50 EDT
From: DHughes030_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...


       Yes. When energized the vacuum solenoid allows vacuum to pass to the 
distributor advance.  Without it, you only have base timming and mechanical 
advance.  After the car warms, the solenoid is energized and timming is 
advanced considerably.

Don  VIN 6860



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Message: 7
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 09:13:18 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Snap on number of oil drain tool.

In a message dated 4/14/02 5:57:48 PM Central Daylight Time, 
jopalatinus_at_dml_davidson.edu writes:


> 
> 
> When I first got my car I inquired about this tool.  The cheapest and 
> quickest way to pop out the plug id with a 8mm hex key that is groung down. 
>  Just go and buy one for a 1.50 at walmart, take it to your bench grinder, 
> and make it look rectangular.  It willl fit perfectly in the hole, and 
> losen and tighten the oil plug with no problems.
> my easy solution
> Joe Palatinus
> 


I'd say the best thing to do is to grind down an old 3/8 ratchet.  then you 
get the benefits of a ratchet and if fits like it should!

Andy

Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 8
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 09:17:24 -0400
From: "Stragand, Dave" <dave.stragand_at_dml_ketchum.com>
Subject: Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits

Here's some interesting info from Mityvac's web site on bleeding your brakes using a vacuum pump.  It helped with some common problems I've had with bleeding brakes.

BRAKE BLEEDING - WHICH WHEEL FIRST?

Q: What is the proper sequence in which to bleed my brakes when using the Mityvac(r) pump for vacuum brake bleeding?

A: When using the vacuum bleeding method to bleed brake systems on vehicles which are rear wheel drive the sequence should start with the wheel closest to the master cylinder and end with the wheel which is farthest from the master cylinder. Example: LF wheel, RF wheel, LR wheel, RR wheel [This is the opposite of normal "pump & release bleeding]

(However, when vacuum bleeding brake systems on vehicles which are front wheel drive the sequence will change. These systems use a diagonal configuration for safety purposes. On this system the sequence should start with the wheel closest to the master cylinder as before, however the next wheel in the sequence will be diagonally aligned with that wheel. Example: LF wheel, RR wheel, RF wheel, LR wheel.)

Q: When I try to bleed my brake system using the Mityvac(r) pump I am getting air bubbles in the line connected to the bleeder screw on the wheel cylinder and little or no fluid is being collected in the reservoir jar. I have tried several times to bleed my brakes without success. What is the cause of this problem?

A: Usually this condition is caused by a small amount of air being pulled between the threads of the bleeder screw and the body of the wheel cylinder or caliper resulting in the appearance of several small bubbles in the line connected to the bleeder screw. This can be corrected quickly and easily. Before you begin to bleed the brake system we suggest that the bleeder screws be removed at all four wheels. With the bleeder screws removed assure all are clean and the passages of the bleeder screws are free of corrosion
or debris. (A small paper clip will work well.) Next, be sure that all brake fluid, penatrating oil, and or grease is removed from the bleeder screw. (Brake cleaning solvent does an excellent job.) Apply a 2 to 3 inch piece of Teflon(r) tape to the threaded area of the bleeder screw only. Wrap the tape in the opposite direction of the rotation of the threads. This will prevent any sepage of air from around the threads. Install each bleeder screw back into the corresponding caliper or wheel cylinder and lightly seat the
bleeder screw. Now you are ready to begin bleeding the brake system! This may seem like quite a bit of work in the beginning, but, once you get started it should only take minutes to complete. In fact, the procedure outlined above is an important step when bleeding brake systems regardless of the method used. It is critical to be sure that each component in the brake system is in proper working order to assure a long lasting repair.
Remember, the brake system is the most important system in your vehicle. If the brake system fails to perform correctly, the results could be disastrous.  [Also, this makes it a heck of a lot easier to release the screws -- no more snapped, rusted bleeders!]

-Dave
VIN 05927
http://www.projectvixen.com



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Message: 9
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 06:06:34 -0500
From: "K Creason" <dmc4687_at_dml_mindspring.com>
Subject: seat backs

Does anyone else have a problem with the back piece of the seat-backs?
The fiber board on mine was breaking when I bought it. I strengthened it
with some more 1/4" fiberboard and finally wrestled it into place...but when
ever I flex back hard (like I'm digging my wallet out) it comes loose again!
What to do? Rivet it in?
-Kevin
#4687




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Message: 10
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 09:11:14 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: Pressure (was Vacuum) brake bleeding

In a message dated 4/14/02 6:30:47 PM Central Daylight Time, 
dswingle_at_dml_enteract.com writes:


> I know this will probably start another Brake Fluid Holy War, but 
> here goes. 
> 
> You probably ought to keep looking for the Castrol. Any quality DOT-4 
> is *probably* OK, but I've heard that the Castrol for some reason is 
> the most compatible with the natural (as opposed to synthetic) rubber 
> used in the DMC braking system. 

List,

Just a note I'd like to make here regarding Castrol in general.  
i'm in the oil change/auto maintenence business and among us, it is widely 
known that Castrol doesn't even make any of it's own products.  Castrol is a 
marketing and advertising company, not a refinery or manufacturer.  In fact, 
you will notice on the back of any castrol product that it does not 
specifically state where the product was made, only that it is 'packaged by 
Castrol'.  Castrol buys their products as ordinary bulk from the other major 
manufacturers, so anything unique to Castrol is just placebo, kind of like 
how someone insists on using the same oil their dad used because 'it's the 
best stuff'.  Further, you will see that Castrol never suggests that their 
products are specifically superior to anyone else's - their claims are always 
the same things that ANY product should have if it is the be certified.

Just a little factoid -
Andy

Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 11
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 18:26:16 +0200
From: "Stian Birkeland" <delorean_at_dml_online.no>
Subject: Hood w/lines 4 sale!

Hello all,
I'm in the process of buying a new hood (flap w/lines), so I'm considering selling my 81 DeLorean #06759's hood. This hood is the "type 2 hood", no fuel flap, but with lines on each side. I never thought I was going to change anything on my DeLorean, but I'm tired of lifting the hood everytime I fill gas... Yes, I still agree that visually the type two hood is better, but right now I appreciate the practical solution.

I will try and present the hood as honest as I can:
I consider my hood to be 98% perfect. 

The only flaws are a few minor scratches (not deep) (-1%) a re-brush, probably w/ "factory" angus wheel and 80grit sandpaper would do the job. There is also one tiny little "dent" (-1%) which is no bigger than the size of a pencil rubber end. I think someone at some point in time accidentally dropped a screwdriver on it.

You can't really see the tiny dent, only when viewed from a certain angle and with the right amount of light. 

If you didn't know it was there, you wouldn't notice it at all. Other than that the hood is perfect - there are no sign of the feared "X" pattern on it (glassfibre mould showing through)

Bids over $600,- will be considered seriously.
Freight will be additional. The hood will have to be crated.

I can e-mail a photo to those who are interested.

Best wishes
Mr. Stian Birkeland
Norway

VIN # 06759


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 12
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 12:25:17 -0400
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Snap on number of oil drain tool.

To stop the motor oil from gushing all over the frame, I cut the bottom and
side out of a plastic bottle and stick it up in there to catch the oil and
funnel it into a pan.  It beats cleaning up spilled oil from the floor &
frame.

Instead of chasing down the Snap-on truck in my neighborhood, I just bought
the same part from PJ Grady.  Since I was ordering other parts anyway, it
was really convenient.

As a variation on the theme of home made oil plug removal tools, I made one
using the following parts:  For the bit that goes in the square hole I used
the shaft from a broken tap which was 8mm square.  For the connection to my
3/8" drive ratchet, I used an old socket that was approximately the same
inner diameter as the outer diameter of the old tap.  I hammered them
together and spot welded the edges.  This home made tool is shorter than the
Snap-on one and gives me a little more clearance.  If I were doing it again,
I would (1st choice) buy John Hervey's hex head oil plug, or (2nd choice)
grind down a 3/8" drive ratchet.  The Rube Goldberg combinations makes for a
mess when the oil comes out.

Walt    Tampa, FL




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Message: 13
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 11:31:44 EDT
From: jrc2905_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits

seems like a lot of work to me. I tool the applicator tip of a tube of gasket 
maker, made it fit my vacuum tube, I remove the bleeder completely and then 
insert this narrow tip into the bleeder hole. it seals tight so i can then 
bleed without any air bubbles. I never did understand why the kit does not 
have this part.



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Message: 14
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 10:40:00 EDT
From: kkoncelik_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: DeLorean Car Show Update

Just to let you know we are almost sold out at the Raddison and at that we 
have 69 rooms gone at this point.  I have 75 reserved. The  Raddison has an 
additional 4 rooms and they have given those to me so at this time there are 
10 rooms left.
At the point where these rooms are sold out I am closing registration for the 
show for Saturday Night and only those with rooms will be able to event 
register .  This will not be prior to May 1st but I think I will enforce the 
deadline.(SAT Only)  There is still plenty of Room  for Thursday, Friday and 
Sunday although Sunday will be filling up as well.

We have 115 + rooms at the Heartbreak and to date 69 at the Raddison thats 
184 rooms.  Cleveland had 115 rooms so as you can see the event will be quite 
a bit bigger than Cleveland.

By the time we are done we will be about 200 Rooms (some people booked other 
hotels)  
There were two people I found booked the Raddison downtown but they also did 
not use the toll free number or the correct hotel number as listed on the 
web.

We have a shot at 100 plus cars again.

Cleveland had 360 total people with 314 being the high for any one event.

I think we will be about 480 with 420 being the high at any one event.

Just some fun facts 
Enjoy and see you in a few weeks in Memphis.

Ken

Deloreancarshow.com


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 15
Date: Sun, 14 Apr 2002 20:48:58 -0400
From: "Marvin" <marv_at_dml_printeddrinkware.com>
Subject: oil drain plug

I used a 12" piece of "key" bent to 90 degrees and it worked great for 12 years. I sold the cars, just bought another one and cannot remember the key size. I think the piece of key was $1.50. Anyone help with the size.

Marv.
was '83 #????, was '81 #4239, now '83 #17077---------I'm baaaack ------ HURRAY!
marv_at_dml_printeddrinkware.com 


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 16
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 14:42:52 -0000
From: "jtrealtywebspannet" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits

I have tried may different ways to bleed brakes and vacuum is the 
least preferred way. When you try to use vacuum you take the chance of 
introducing air and contaiminants into the system or at least the 
bleeder. The bleeder screws were not deseigned to be used in that 
manner. Some advice was to remove the bleeder screw and "grease it up" 
and reinstall loosly but I never had luck with this method, I always 
seem to pull air I think at the bleeder screw. Besides if there is any 
crud in the bleeder screw it doesn't work at all.
 Pressure is the best way and the "Poor Man's" way is with an 
assistant. Short of that there is a cheap device that consists of a 
short piece of hose with a small plastic check valve. Use a small 
container with some fluid in it so you don't pull any air back in. The 
procedure is to do the master cylinder first, then front left, front 
right , rear left then rear right and repeat at least once. Make sure 
the fluid runs clear, which is why you really should watch as you 
bleed. A pressure bleeder is the the best way to go if you can afford 
it. NEVER mix brands of brake fluid and always use sealed cans. Get a 
kid to help you and all you have to promise him is a ride! The owner's 
manual says to change the brake fluid and clutch every 2 years. 
Current wisdom is to only use Castrol GTLMA Dot 4 as it seems the most 
compliant with the materiels used in the brake system. You should be 
able to find it in any large auto supply that handles the Castrol 
brand which is reletively popular. Dot 5 silicone does not absorb 
moisture but has a problem of dissolved air which increases 
compressability and on many older cars (Deloreans not included) 
increases brake pedal travel to the extent that to stop you have to 
pump the brakes, not what you want in a panic stop! It is very 
expensive and if mixed with any other DOT like 3 or 4 now you have to 
dump the whole system dissasemble, flush, and reassemble!
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "Hank Eskin" <heskin_at_dml_b...> wrote:
> 
> Hello All,
> 
>   I need to bleed my brakes, and today I picked up a $25 vacuum
> pump/one-person-brake-bleeding kit at Autozone.  What are peoples' 
opinions
> about these type of kits, do they do the same job as a traditional 
two-man
> brake bleeding procedure, and is there anything I should look out 
for when
> using this kit?
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> -Hank Eskin #1619




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Message: 17
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 12:59:42 -0400
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Vacuum brake bleeding kits

When bleeding my brakes, I used the same Mityvac pump only I didn't follow
the directions that well.  It didn't occur to me that vacuum bleeding the
brakes is done in the reverse order as pressure bleeding.  I followed the
directions for wrapping the bleed screws in teflon tape, but I found that no
matter how much teflon I used, plenty of air still bypassed the bleed
screws.  The directions explained how to tell the difference between "small
bubbles" that bypass the bleed screws vs. "large bubbles" that need to be
purged.  Since I got plenty of "small bubbles" along with occasional "medium
bubbles" that the directions didn't mention, I dabbed teflon paste outside
the calipers where I thought air was getting in and managed to vacuum some
of the paste into the brake fluid.  (Don't try this).

I agree with Dave Stragand that it is a good idea to leave teflon tape on
the bleed screws because brake fluid residue doesn't age well.  I've made it
a practice to mop out the remaining brake fluid from the bleed screws before
putting the dust covers on.  If you don't remove it, it will turn to gunk
and contribute to problems later on.

As a variation on the theme of vacuum bleeding:  If I were trying it again,
I would specially modify a spare set of bleed screws by welding shut the
hole on the side and drilling a new hole straight through the screw.  This
would allow the screw to be seated completely so that no air would bypass
the threads.  Then when I'm through I would replace these screws with
unmodified ones.  No air should re-enter the system with the screws out
because they would gravity bleed.

My biggest waste of time was not keeping an eye on the fluid reservoir.  If
you run the thing dry then you have to start all over again by taking the
master cylinder off and bench bleeding it (again!).  After that I hooked a
continuity meter to the low fluid switch in the cap so that I could hear
when the fluid got too low.  But this safeguard would probably be
unnecessary if you aren't sucking a lot of air around the bleed screws.

The next time I bleed my brakes, I'm going to try the home made pressure
bleeding method only instead of using a bug sprayer I would use dry shop air
regulated to a really low setting.  I am apprehensive about pressurizing the
reservoir.  It seems like pressure could cause it to leak easily.  And
instead of using teflon on the threads, I might buy a bottle of the brush on
stuff that is specifically made for brake bleed screws (not the gooey
plumbers variety).

Walt    Tampa, FL




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Message: 18
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 15:51:18 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: seat backs

In a message dated 4/15/02 10:07:13 AM Central Daylight Time, 
dmc4687_at_dml_mindspring.com writes:


> Does anyone else have a problem with the back piece of the seat-backs?
> The fiber board on mine was breaking when I bought it. I strengthened it
> with some more 1/4" fiberboard and finally wrestled it into place...but 
> when
> ever I flex back hard (like I'm digging my wallet out) it comes loose 
> again!
> What to do? Rivet it in?
> -Kevin
> #4687


Kevin,

here's what to do.  go to home depot and buy a product called 'hardboard'.  
it comes in big sheets, it will be enough to make 2 seatbacks if you want.  
Then take your chair out and bring it to an upholstry/interior shop and tell 
them you want them to rebuild your seatback with the new hardboard and have 
them secure the seat back in so it doesn't pop out.  the problem is the 
rivets get loose and they don't adequately secure the board in over time.  
anyway, when i got the seat back, they did an awesome job and i can feel that 
they screwed it in all around it but you can't see the screws because somehow 
they did it w/o it being seeable. cost me about $40 total i think.   i tried 
to rebuild the seat myself first but the rivets kept busting through the 
board and making the brackets loose.

Andy

Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


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Message: 19
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 18:36:33 -0000
From: "cdrugly" <tgoodwin_at_dml_vantagep.com>
Subject: Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...

Got the tune-up package from John Hervey. I installed the Bosch 
Platinum +4 plugs. You can see a pic of it here:

http://www.specialtauto.com/images/boschtuneupkit.jpg

I'm going to work on the electrical connection to the vacuum solenoid 
when I get home and see it this remedies the problem.

>Where did you get your parts, and what plugs did you use?
>
>Andy
>
>Soma576_at_dml_a...
>1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
>Fargo, ND 58102 





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Message: 20
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 14:09:59 -0600
From: Mark Noeltner <mark_at_dml_buffalochips.org>
Subject: Re: oil drain plug

At 08:48 PM 4/14/02 -0400, you wrote:
>I used a 12" piece of "key" bent to 90 degrees and it worked great for 12
years. I sold the cars, just bought another one and cannot remember the key
size. I think the piece of key was $1.50. Anyone help with the size.
>
>Marv.
>was '83 #????, was '81 #4239, now '83 #17077---------I'm baaaack ------
HURRAY!
>marv_at_dml_printeddrinkware.com 

5/16" which is about 7.94mm and fits the 8mm hole in the drain plug very
well. I did the same thing. Key stock is harder than plain steel stock and
doesn't bend as easily in use. Any good hardware store or farm supply
should have it.

Mark N
VIN 6820



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Message: 21
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 18:29:22 -0500
From: "Scott Mueller" <scott.a.mueller_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Pressure Bleeder

I made a poor mans pressure bleeder.
I bought a new master cylinder cap and put a tire valve stem through it.
Fill the master cylinder and then attach a tire chuck to the valve stem.  I
set my air compressor regulator to a couple of PSI.  Watch the fluid level
in the master cylinder and make sure that the regulator is doing its job.  I
have used this technique with my DMC, Truck and other cars.

Scott Mueller
002981




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Message: 22
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 10:55:43 -0700
From: "Adam Price" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: auto transmission pan gasket


Does anyone have a cross reference for the auto trany pan gasket? Someone 
has to make it.. does Purolator make one?

Also someone posted a while back what the correct designation numbers for 
the auto tranny is. All I know is that its made by Renault Fuego.

Thanks, Adam

_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp.




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Message: 23
Date: Tue, 16 Apr 2002 00:48:49 -0000
From: "shainbrannan" <shain_at_dml_elecmods.com>
Subject: Parking Brake Cable Replacment Help

Hello,

I recently rebuilt ym rear calipers and am in the process of 
replacing my passenger side rear parking brake line.  Can someone 
please tell me the proper procedure to to remove and replace the old 
one.  I have it off at the brake end and am up to where it enters 
the car.  I have the parking brake handle off the car (the cables 
came off earlier).  I'm a little puzzled as to where the cable 
enters the car and how it hooks up to the handle.  Seems like there 
is very small amount of room to work there.  And also if there is an 
adjustment procedure as well for the brake end.  I'm also in the 
process and replacing all the rear lines with SS ones,  think i can 
manager that it;s just going to be a little tight, but what isn't on 
this car.  Runnign out of time until the spring social.

- Shain
#10140





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Message: 24
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 20:50:03 -0400
From: "Stragand, Dave" <dave.stragand_at_dml_ketchum.com>
Subject: The Resurrection of Vixen Continues...

Hi All,
 
One of the rather interesting things about my electrical system is that
it has eaten three batteries already and has yet to be on the road.
Seeing as how I don't run the engine in the garage much (I prefer to get
my CO from cigarettes, thanks) I often place the battery on an automatic
charger.  Well, last Saturday I woke up thinking "what's that smell"?  I
searched my house and found that 1) I really needed to do my dishes, 2)
I really needed take my garbage out, and most relevantly, 3) the battery
on the D was boiling -- the acid smell was really permeating my house.
The meter on the charger still read only 50%.  Checking the charger
revealed that it actually DREW .75 amps when connected but unplugged
from the AC, so I've replaced both my charger and the battery (which
luckily, has a 24 month free replacement program.  Scratch one gremlin
there, I guess.
 
With the new battery, I was able to start the car for the first time in
about a year.  She fired right up and ran perfectly, until the idle
dropped and she stalled.   I'm thinking the problem is in the warm-up or
idle systems.  While still running just fine above idle, leaving up on
the pedal will result in a stumbling, sputtering engine.  I'd like to
move the car outside soon and try warming her up sufficiently to rule
out one or the other... and burn off the 18 month old fuel (with fuel
stabilizer) to see if that will help as well.  I guess there could be
problems with the flow plate piston gummed up in the fuel distributor
again, or maybe a sticking idle speed motor or leaky injector.  I
suppose it's also possible that my newly installed O2 sensor may not be
quite up & ready, so simply disconnecting the sensor will be a good test
there.  I guess even a cranky warm-up regulator may be at fault as well,
but since she runs fine at anything even slightly off-idle, a hunch
tells me that's not the case.  If anyone can save me a step or two and
point me in the right direction, that would be appreciated.
 
I've also been investigating a couple of leads on a good used passenger
door, and have decided to use the original driver's door which only has
a couple of nicks.  Hopefully those can be filled in with weld, ground
flush, and regrained.
 
Now that tax day is over, I'll also be dumping out the approximately
$3,000-4,000 I'm going to need to finish the project.  On the bright
side, I may be the first person to be awarded a frequent flyer ticket on
my USAir Visa exclusively from buying DeLorean parts.
 
57 Days left until Memphis!
 
-Dave
VIN #05927
Read the entire progress of the restoration at
http://www.projectvixen.com
 
 
 


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Message: 25
Date: Mon, 15 Apr 2002 20:35:34 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Does a tune-up ever go right? Not when I do it...

In a message dated 4/15/02 7:28:54 PM Central Daylight Time, 
tgoodwin_at_dml_vantagep.com writes:


> Got the tune-up package from John Hervey. I installed the Bosch 
> Platinum +4 plugs. You can see a pic of it here:
> 
> http://www.specialtauto.com/images/boschtuneupkit.jpg

I don't know if that's the problem or not, but Rob Grady told me he doesn't 
put the platinum plugs into the cars he works on - he said they don't 
performin the PRV as well as the copper or silver tip plugs he sells.  sure, 
the platinum plugs probably last longer, but i'd rather go with overall 
reliability than sheer durability.  not only that, but you know what it's 
like to pull steel out of aluminum after many years... i wouldn't want a plug 
to break off in there because i bought plugs that 'last forever'!!!!!!

just a thought!
Andy 

Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


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