From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 995
Date: Sunday, April 21, 2002 6:33 AM

To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
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There are 17 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: auto transmission pan gasket
From: "Dave Sontos" <dsontos_at_dml_sybercom.net>

2. MACHINED SHIFT KNOBS WILL HAVE PATTERNS AND LOGOS
From: "Casey Putsch" <chaparral2a002_at_dml_hotmail.com>

3. Re: CO adjustment using a dwell meter?
From: "Dave Sontos" <dsontos_at_dml_sybercom.net>

4. Re: Fuel tank made from Stainless steel? (long!)
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

5. Re: my 134a conversion begins...
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>

6. Re: my 134a conversion begins... / Next Vin from mine 4 sale
From: "Chris" <chris_at_dml_internets.freeserve.co.uk>

7. Fw: my 134a conversion begins...
From: "Chris" <chris_at_dml_internets.freeserve.co.uk>

8. Re: my 134a conversion begins...
From: "dmcman82" <dmcman73_at_dml_hotmail.com>

9. full throttle microswitch
From: Delorean17_at_dml_aol.com

10. Re: Door Handle (Inside)
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>

11. Re: auto transmission pan gasket
From: "adam_one_million" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>

12. Re: full throttle microswitch
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com

13. R-12
From: Les Huckins <jhuckins_at_dml_cybersurfers.net>

14. Re: CO adjustment using a dwell meter?
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>

15. Re: Hot Fan Breaker... Fire would be bad.
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>

16. Front coil springs
From: "Paul Salsbury" <paul.salsbury_at_dml_btinternet.com>

17. Fuel Mixture unit Gasket Leak?
From: "pbartusek" <pbmain_at_dml_mindspring.com>





Message: 1
Date: Fri, 19 Apr 2002 23:08:44 -0400
From: "Dave Sontos" <dsontos_at_dml_sybercom.net>
Subject: Re: auto transmission pan gasket

Go to your local auto parts store and buy a roll of cork gasket material.
Costs a couple of bucks. Unroll the material, place the pan flange side down
on the cork material, take a ink pen or #2 pencil and trace around the
outside of the flange. Next, trace all the bolt holes in the flange. Remove
the pan and trace a line one inch on the inside of the outside flange line.
Take a pair of scissors and cut out the gasket. Take a 1/4" paper hole punch
and punch out the bolt holes. Install the pan back in the car and go for a
drive and put the money you saved into a good lunch out.




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Message: 2
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 01:00:20 -0400
From: "Casey Putsch" <chaparral2a002_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: MACHINED SHIFT KNOBS WILL HAVE PATTERNS AND LOGOS

I have recieved so many requests for the DMC logo and the shift pattern on 
the knobs, I had to investigate this. I may be able to have this cut into 
the knobs with lasar or possibly silk screen on very durable bakable paint. 
However this will ad to the cost of the knobs some.

Sincerely, Casey at http://putschdesign.tripod.com/PPD/




_________________________________________________________________
Send and receive Hotmail on your mobile device: http://mobile.msn.com




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Message: 3
Date: Fri, 19 Apr 2002 22:52:26 -0400
From: "Dave Sontos" <dsontos_at_dml_sybercom.net>
Subject: Re: CO adjustment using a dwell meter?

Dan,
This is the updated address for the dwell meter procedure
http://personal.picusnet.com/dsontos/tuneup.htm

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dan B" <dbergl_at_dml_hotmail.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, April 19, 2002 4:21 PM
Subject: [DML] CO adjustment using a dwell meter?


> A while back there was a link sent by David Sontos with instructions on
how
> to adjust the CO mixture using a dwell meter.  He gave a URL but it seems
> that the page no longer exists




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Message: 4
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 00:01:52 -0400
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Fuel tank made from Stainless steel? (long!)

Comments on Robert's post:

> 1. The high pressue line on the fuel pump is touching the
> fiberglass underbody, and thus transmits the vibrations that
> resonate throughout the car.

I hear you, and I hear it; but this isn't the problem I'm trying to solve.
My fuel pump is noisy like most everyone else's all the time, but I'm trying
to cure a specific temperature/noise correlated problem.  When the fuel gets
hot, the pump becomes extremely noisy -- making all kinds of rude
farting/gurgling noises.

> 2. Gasoline gets hot, softens the pickup hose on the pump, and
> negative pressure inside the hose causes it to collapse. Thus
> the fuel pump is starved of liquid to lubricate it, and it begins to
> whine.

I hear you again, and again I eliminated this as a possible problem by 1)
replacing my OEM fuel suction hose with the PJ Grady variety which is
noticeably thicker, stiffer & heavier, but I still get the temperature
related noisy fuel pump problem.  2) So next I stretched out a screen door
spring and threaded it through the new hose.  This didn't help at all.
While the fuel is cool, the pump is pretty much silent; however, with
extended abuse its base line noise has increased substantially.  I think it
is on it's way out, so I'm driving around now with a spare fuel pump & tools
to change it out just in case.  On a hot day after a trip across town, I put
a thermometer in my tank and measured the temperature to be 118 degrees
Fahrenheit.

> Deflectors
> for the front radiator are a waste of time, materials, and vehicle
> weight. The prevent high flow exhaust from the front radiator, and
> they can cause a pressure lock-up at speeds over 70MPH as I
> have been told.

I have looked into installing a deflector and can easily see the problems
you mention.  My suggestion is to construct a deflector that is shaped like
a plow that would fit between the fiberglass underbody and the frame.  This
wouldn't restrict air movement as much as other designs.  Since one of my
radiator fans might be going bad (I can't tell if it is howling occasionally
or if it is my fuel pump that is going bad) I might consider building a new
radiator shroud to hold aftermarket radiator fans.  It would have a shape
that would duct the air away from the fuel tank.  I'm thinking that putting
the new fans in front of the radiator might work better.

Comments on Sean's post:

> Instead of producing a stainless tank to make room for insulation, etc. as
> well as reducing the volume of the tank, have you considered installing a
> fuel radiator on the return line?  Summit Racing has a dual pass radiator
> meant for this purpose.

I have spotted this in their catalogue before and am seriously considering
it.  I'm thinking that maybe the best place for it would be in the frame
near the fuel accumulator and be installed in the fuel return line.  The one
that Summit Racing has seems too small according to their photo.  Maybe an
oil cooling radiator could be made to work better.  If done properly, I
don't see how it could be any more or less dangerous than one made for fuel.

Comments to Martin's post:

> The stock tank is a superb material and was designed that way for
crash-worthiness.

I agree that it is a superb material since I bought a running gear that had
been baking out in the sun for 3 or 4 years.  The exposed OEM tank shows
almost no signs of sun damage.  Though, I don't think this would make the
tank any more crash-worthy.  I have seen a photo of a RHD conversion that
used a metal tank.  I'd like to know more about that as well as the one that
Don _at_dml_ DeLorean Motor Company came up with.

Comments to Farrar's post:

> A stainless fuel tank sounds wonderful. Have you considered aluminum?

I think that aluminum would be a bad idea because it corrodes more.  For the
fuel pump, this isn't much of a problem, but the tank would be susceptible
to water collecting at the bottom and also to condensation clinging to the
top.  In order to be practical, an aluminum tank would need to be coated.
There are paints specifically made for this, but I would rather not have to
fool with it.

As for one material having better insulating properties than another, this
is a weird situation with the fuel tank.  Making a tank out of materials
that conduct heat better than the OEM plastic will probably make it more apt
to pick up heat from the coolant pipes and hot air from the radiator.

My main concern at this point is not making the fuel pump more quiet in as
much as keeping the fuel cooler for other reasons.  118F is just too hot for
fuel.  It taxes the evaporative control system.  It allows the more volatile
components to boil off sooner.  It allows the oxygenated components to
degrade quicker.  If I were going to put my car in storage and wanted to do
it with a minimum amount of fuel left in the tank, I wouldn't want to do it
with fuel that had been previously cooked in there.  (Not that I would store
a car with fuel in it anyway.)

My long term goal is to change out the frame with a stainless one.  But
first Pearce Design has to finish making it.  I was supposed to have it two
months ago, but then I tell them I'm not in any hurry.  So I suppose now
they aren't either.  When I move everything over to the new frame, I'm going
to experiment with installing an air deflector, fuel radiator, and possibly
a stainless fuel tank.  I was just looking over my junk frame today that
still has the fuel tank inside.  It wouldn't take a lot of volume from the
tank to make room for 1/2" or so of foam refrigerant pipe insulation.  Any
volume that is consumed in this way could be made up for by making the tank
longer in the front.  The rubber pads there don't need to be that thick.
There clearances on the sides maybe could be less, too.  (But when I removed
my tank before, I remember having to stand in the trunk and stomp it out.)
When done, a new tank with room for insulation could have a larger capacity
than the OEM.  Food for thought.

Walt    Tampa, FL




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Message: 5
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 00:38:51 -0400
From: "Walter Coe" <Whalt_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: my 134a conversion begins...

Andy,

One thing that I seem to always hear about R-134a conversions is that they
do not cool as well as the original R-12.  I understand that the main reason
for this is that R-134a requires a larger condenser than what comes with an
R-12 system.  I heard a comment from someone a while back that one of the
DeLorean vendors is selling an increased capacity condenser specifically for
R-134a conversions.  If anyone can confirm this, I want to know too.

> 2.  what about the "A/C dryer" that some places have told me will need to
be
> replaced? i can't find anything on any of the vendor's sites that is
called a
> dryer.  does the DeLorean have this part?

The "dryer" is an old term for what is now referred to as the "accumulator".
Since both the fuel system and a/c system have accumulators, the terminology
gets confusing.

> 4.  does the line that goes from the accumulator to the evaporator need to
be
> changed?

I have heard an interesting story enough times that I suppose it is true:
When Mercedes first introduced R-134a as original equipment, they had
massive problems with leaks.  It turned out that their prototype conversions
worked fine because the refrigerant lines were already 'broken in' using
R-12, but the new production cars with the same type of hoses seeped
refrigerant everywhere.  From this the industry learned that new hoses had
to be specifically made to handle the smaller molecular shape of R-134a.
The type of hose used for R-12 was too porous for R-134a, but was fine for
R-12.  However(!), once a hose had been used for some time with R-12 in it,
stray R-12 molecules would clog the pores enough so that the smaller R-134a
molecules would not leak out.  The moral of the story:  You can convert a
well used R-12 system to R-134a without changing the hoses.  But if you use
new hoses, they need to be of the type that is not porous to the smaller
R-134a molecule.

My opinion on this is that if you had problems with the other OEM hoses
leaking R-12, then it is a given that they will leak R-134a even worse.  I
would be concerned that your evaporator hoses would not be any different.

DMC Joe is an avid believer in using a drop in R-12 substitute called
Freeze-12.  I think it costs around $15 for a 12 oz. can and cools as well
as (not worse or better than) the real R-12.  I saw a shelf full of cans of
the stuff at a local import specialty parts store.  The owner swore by the
stuff.  People say that it is not flammable and can be topped off and still
not become flammable.  The store owner told me that it is not legal in some
states and there are issues with importing/exporting it.

I am certainly no authority on any of this stuff, so if anyone wants to
correct me or confirm any of this, please do so.  I'm only going by what
I've heard and not from any manuals or text books.

Walt    Tampa, FL




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Message: 6
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 13:09:13 +0100
From: "Chris" <chris_at_dml_internets.freeserve.co.uk>
Subject: Re: my 134a conversion begins... / Next Vin from mine 4 sale

Hi

I dont know about the USA but in the UK there is a replacement for R12,
which is R24a and it is an ozone friendly replacement for R12.
Converting to R134a should cost a lot as they should replace the whole
system including pipes as R134a is totally different.

Some Air con specialists only flush the system then replace the
condenser/dryer and then charge less that 200 (about $300 ), but you will
be constanly re gassing the system. In the UK it costs about 80 ($110) to
re gass with R24a.

On another note I noticed Vin 16328 for sale in PA. My vin is 16327! I found
it on Hemmings..what are the chances of that :-)
See http://www.raycoeuro.com/html/83Delorean.html

Chris S
Vin 16327

----- Original Message -----
From: <Soma576_at_dml_aol.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, April 19, 2002 11:04 PM
Subject: [DML] my 134a conversion begins...


> Hey all,
>
> one of the last things that i need to do to get my car complete is to
rebuild
> the A/C system.  when i bought the car in 2000, the A/C worked ok but
didn't
> work when i took the car out of storage.  i had it recharged and it worked
> perfectly for a while until the compressor cycling became excessive and i
> eventually blew one of the long A/C lines.  and that's how it has been
ever
> since last summer.  this year i want to get things rolling again....
>
> i have decided to switch over to R-134a freon.  R-12 is becoming
> prohibitively expensive around here ($90/lb), especially if i have a leaky
> system.  R-134a is only $8/lb.  last year i had my A/C checked out after
the
> leak and they found dye pretty much everywhere under there where there are
> metal to rubber connections, and the two main lines were both leaking
freon
> down the whole length of them.  so it is obvious i will need new lines.
> anyway, i have had my car's underbody steamcleaned and i am going to take
the
> car in to a local A/C shop to have it evaluated.  what we will do is just
> charge the system with a couple lbs of 134A and find out where the leaks
are
> so i know what needs to be replaced.  after that i'm going to get my old
long
> hoses out and bring them to a hose shop in town who custom makes A/C
lines.
> they looked at them today on the car and estimated about $130 for both
lines
> including the fittings.  then i'll get the new lines from them minus the
> fittings attached and feed them thru the frame and they will crimp the new
> ends on them with the lines on the car.  this will save me the hassle of
> lifting the body from the frame.  i'll probably have to replace the high
and
> low pressure switches too, or at least i'll do it just because i'll
already
> be in there.  depending on what else is leaking, i'll have to replace that
> stuff too.  once everything is leak-free, i am having another local place
> change whatever o-rings need to be changed and they will also vacuum the
> system and put different oil in and charge it up.  HOPEFULLY everything
will
> work!!
>
> 1.  what does everyone else think about this?? am i missing anything
really
> important?
>
> 2.  what about the "A/C dryer" that some places have told me will need to
be
> replaced? i can't find anything on any of the vendor's sites that is
called a
> dryer.  does the DeLorean have this part?
>
> 3.  any ideas on what else will need to be done to make the A/C work
> correctly?
>
> 4.  does the line that goes from the accumulator to the evaporator need to
be
> changed?
>
> 5.  and what about the line from the lower fitting on the condensor?
>
> any insight is greatly appreciated!!
> Andy
>
> Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
> 1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
> Fargo, ND 58102
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
> To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
> moderator_at_dml_dmcnews.com
>
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
>
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
>
>
>
>





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Message: 7
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 14:32:26 +0100
From: "Chris" <chris_at_dml_internets.freeserve.co.uk>
Subject: Fw: my 134a conversion begins...

> I dont know about the USA but in the UK there is a replacement for R12,
> which is R24a and it is an ozone friendly replacement for R12.
> Converting to R134a should cost a lot as they should replace the whole
> system including pipes as R134a is totally different.

Sorry, just checked the sticker and its RS 24 not R24a

Chris S
Vin 16327





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Message: 8
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 14:03:20 -0000
From: "dmcman82" <dmcman73_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: my 134a conversion begins...

1. Check the price on R20 (or is it 22?), it's the freon used in 
home A/C's, I believe it is cheaper than R134a...if so use this to 
try and find your leak, then after you have, evacuate the system of 
it.

2. The A/C dryer is the evaporator and yes this needs to be changed 
especially since your system was left open (broken A/C line).

3. See if you can get a hold of an automatic adjustig oriface tube. 
From what I have read it's suppose to be a lot better in an R134a, 
getting it colder.

4. I would only change it if it's bad, otherwise if it's cheap 
enough to have made change it.

5. Again, I would only change it if it's bad, otherwise if it's 
cheap enough to have made change it.

Steve

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., Soma576_at_dml_a... wrote:
<SNIP>> 
> 1.  what does everyone else think about this?? am i missing 
anything really 
> important?  
> 
> 2.  what about the "A/C dryer" that some places have told me will 
need to be 
> replaced? i can't find anything on any of the vendor's sites that 
is called a 
> dryer.  does the DeLorean have this part?  
> 
> 3.  any ideas on what else will need to be done to make the A/C 
work 
> correctly? 
> 
> 4.  does the line that goes from the accumulator to the evaporator 
need to be 
> changed?  
> 
> 5.  and what about the line from the lower fitting on the 
condensor?
> 
> any insight is greatly appreciated!!
> Andy
> 
> Soma576_at_dml_a...
> 1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
> Fargo, ND 58102
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 9
Date: Fri, 19 Apr 2002 23:31:16 EDT
From: Delorean17_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: full throttle microswitch

Hi,
    When the full throttle microswitch on my car is depressed it does not do 
anything (on my last car the RPMS went up slightly when depressed).  I have 
an automatic and the car does down shift when floored but the separate full 
throttle switch doesn't seem to be working.  I replaced the switch and I 
still don't get a change in RPMS when it is depressed.  If it isn't the 
switch what else could it be?  The Frequency valve is buzzing so that is 
working fine.  The car runs perfectly but I would like to get this fixed for 
passing purposes;).  Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks
David



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Message: 10
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 03:56:46 -0400
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>
Subject: Re: Door Handle (Inside)

>Then use an extension to put the 
> bolts back in.  It can be very tricky, and my first few times at it 
> I had to continuously remove the bottom piece to retrieve the bolts 
> that fell out of my socket.  Good luck!!

I used the miracle of masking tape to hold the bolt in the socket.  Put
it on loose and it will hold the bolt til it's started and then will come
out with the socket....

Jim 1537

________________________________________________________________
GET INTERNET ACCESS FROM JUNO!
Juno offers FREE or PREMIUM Internet access for less!
Join Juno today!  For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/web/.



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Message: 11
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 15:18:15 -0000
From: "adam_one_million" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: auto transmission pan gasket

Hey Dave. I thought of this already, but the cork sheet isnt thick 
enough, and I would haveto layer it about 5 or 6 times to acheive the 
thickness of the original gasket, thats too much of a hassle. I am 
ordering an official one from Ralph.

Oh yeah, and I can say that the transmission used on the Fuego is 
different from the delorean. The pan gasket is a crazy rubber thing 
that looks more like weather stripping. It is only the governor that 
is the same between these cars! Thanks for the info Senator!

Adam


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_y..., "Dave Sontos" <dsontos_at_dml_s...> wrote:
> Go to your local auto parts store and buy a roll of cork gasket 
material.
> Costs a couple of bucks. Unroll the material, place the pan flange 
side down
> on the cork material, take a ink pen or #2 pencil and trace around 
the
> outside of the flange. Next, trace all the bolt holes in the 
flange. Remove
> the pan and trace a line one inch on the inside of the outside 
flange line.
> Take a pair of scissors and cut out the gasket. Take a 1/4" paper 
hole punch
> and punch out the bolt holes. Install the pan back in the car and 
go for a
> drive and put the money you saved into a good lunch out.




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Message: 12
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 11:53:28 EDT
From: dherv10_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: full throttle microswitch

David, Do you have the original or the replacement switch. Maby the wires on 
the back of the switch need to be switched.The switch should be normally open 
then closed to ground. 
John



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Message: 13
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 09:43:27 +0000
From: Les Huckins <jhuckins_at_dml_cybersurfers.net>
Subject: R-12

If you happen to be driving in Mexico and you brought your installation
connector, R-12 is about $6 (US) a can.




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Message: 14
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 14:38:25 -0400
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: CO adjustment using a dwell meter?

Dan

I am curious as to the answer to your question. I don't understand how
information from a dwell meter would have any influence on adjusting the CO
mixture.

DMC Joe
Tech Information, DMC Joe Help Club, & Store
"Summer Parts Sale"
http://shopping.oraclesmallbusiness.com/dsvstore
DeLorean Website Directory www.dmc.tv

----- Original Message -----
From: "Dan B" <dbergl_at_dml_hotmail.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Friday, April 19, 2002 4:21 PM
Subject: [DML] CO adjustment using a dwell meter?


> A while back there was a link sent by David Sontos with instructions on
how
> to adjust the CO mixture using a dwell meter.  He gave a URL but it seems
> that the page no longer exists (http://www.vabch.com/dsontos/tuneup.html)
> Does anyone know where i can find this information?  I did a search on
> google and I couldn't find an archived version of the page.
>
> Dan





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Message: 15
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 15:00:04 -0400
From: "DMC Joe" <dmcjoe_at_dml_att.net>
Subject: Re: Hot Fan Breaker... Fire would be bad.

Steve,

If your fans are activating from the AC operation the fans are supposed to
cycle with the compressor. They should not be running continuously. As a
matter of fact, unless your car is equipped with a fan by-pass switch
modification, the fans should never run constantly except in high
temperature (above 95 deg F) stop and go traffic.

High temperatures inside the electrical compartment are normal.

As we all know the fuse block is very vulnerable to melt down's therefore I
always recommendation that the car not be operated with the fuse cover
installed over the fuse block. If you take the cover off, invert it, and
place it towards the rear of the electrical compartment it makes for a
convenient spare fuse and small bulb storage tray while allowing the fuse
block to breathe.

DMC Joe
Tech Information, DMC Joe Help Club, & Store
"Summer Parts Sale"
http://shopping.oraclesmallbusiness.com/dsvstore
DeLorean Website Directory www.dmc.tv

----- Original Message -----
From: "Steve Peck" <stevepeck1_at_dml_yahoo.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, April 18, 2002 10:53 PM
Subject: [DML] Hot Fan Breaker... Fire would be bad.


> After 20 minutes or so driving with AC on, my breaker gets HOT as does the
> two THICK brown wires going to it.  The breaker is new, PJ Grady's
> recommended upgrade.  It cycles (trips) on and off about two minutes,
which
> is NOT good.
>
> My Fan Fail Bypass is only about 16 gauge wire.  Could that have something
> to do with it?  LOTS of relays are quite hot as well, but I might assume
> that some of that is normal, no?
>
> I have read any number of fixes, and see the Mini and Maxi brute packages
> available.  My buddy Martin is working on other fan issues, but in the
mean
> time I really can't afford an electrical fire.  I am against that...
>
> The "D" is back sadly in my garage until I figure this out...
>
> Of all the dozen solutions out there, is there one that is do-able without
> investing another $300?
>
> Thanks.
> -Steve Peck
>
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
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Message: 16
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 22:28:02 +0100
From: "Paul Salsbury" <paul.salsbury_at_dml_btinternet.com>
Subject: Front coil springs

Can any one give me a step by step idiots guide to changing front coil
springs....

I have new springs and fancy doing the job tomorrow.

Thanks
Paul
#6463

www.paul.salsbury.btinternet.co.uk




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Message: 17
Date: Sat, 20 Apr 2002 22:12:13 -0000
From: "pbartusek" <pbmain_at_dml_mindspring.com>
Subject: Fuel Mixture unit Gasket Leak?

Had a question for the group...

How common is it for there to be a leak in the gasket that goes 
between the lower housing of the fuel mixture housing and the 
throttle valve assembly?  

The reason I ask is that my car was running ok, with the exception of 
some issues I posted on last fall where the car would be going fine 
down the highway, but when I released the gas for a moment and then 
accellerated again, the car would just start dropping speed.  It 
seemed as if backing off the accelerator would help a bit, but the 
car wouldn't go above 55, and I'd have to do some quick lane changes 
as everyone here in Detroit wanted to speed by...

I decided a tune up couldn't hurt the situation, but then the 
nightmare really began - after new spark plugs/wires/cap/rotor, 
(taking off the two bolts and pulling up on the mixture unit to get 
clearance to get the distributor cap off, and the car ran like 
complete garbage.  Couldn't go above 25.  I looked and looked for any 
sign of a vaccum leak, disconnected wires, etc.  Nothing that I could 
spot. I started replacing the replaced parts, with the old parts that 
at least would let the car run good enough to drive around town, and 
still the same symptoms.  The car sat through the winter in the 
garage, and now when I went to turn it on, it won't start - unless 
you give it gas right away and keep it above 1000rpm.  No longer does 
it sit at the nice fast idle, then back off after a couple minutes.  
You just have to kick in the gas or else it won't even be close to 
staying alive, and the word idle is not a part of this car's 
functionality any longer! If you floor the pedal, it won't go above 
1000 or 2000 or wherever you have it - it just sounds starts 
sputtering.  If you back off the accelerator a bit, it zooms up in 
RPM very fast.  If you accellerate more gradually, it will rise, but 
usually sounds a bit rough in doing so...Took the plugs out - all are 
equally alike - dull black.  

I'm kind of stuck at this point that I'm not sure if I should be 
chasing fuel system issues, vacuum issues, distributor, etc... The 
obvious answer seems to be 'retrace your steps, you screwed something 
up', but I've gone over distributor cap wire routing, replaced the 
new parts with old and back again, trying to find the mysterious 
variable that's causing the problems, but I just seem to be getting 
more problems without reducing the number of variables!

Any suggestions on testing vaccum, fuel pressure, or any other common 
Delorean troubleshooting steps for something like this are greatly 
appreciated...
Pete Bartusek
#6707





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