From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 1408
Date: Wednesday, March 05, 2003 2:00 PM

To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com

For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see www.dmcnews.com

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There are 17 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Long Term Storage
From: "David Teitelbaum <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

2. Re: Toby TABs
From: "Ralph Isenberg, III" <delorean1981dmc_at_dml_hotmail.com>

3. Mechanically Challenged
From: Mathew Halpern <mhalpern_at_dml_tampabay.rr.com>

4. Adjustable rear link installation
From: "M. P. Olans <mpolans_at_dml_creeper.com>" <mpolans_at_dml_creeper.com>

5. Re: Toby TABs
From: John Gedeon <johne_g_at_dml_yahoo.com>

6. Re: This is so frustrating!!!
From: "James LaLonde <deloreandmcxii_at_dml_excite.com>" <deloreandmcxii_at_dml_excite.com>

7. Electrical problem - please help!
From: "Dan C. Benedek <5n-_at_dml_gmx.net>" <5n-_at_dml_gmx.net>

8. DMC+Speedbump=OUCH
From: Gus Schlachter <gus_at_dml_austin.rr.com>

9. Re: Toby TABs
From: "Marcel Bourgon" <mbourgon_at_dml_elp.rr.com>

10. Re: DMC+Speedbump=OUCH
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

11. Toby TABs
From: "Darryl Tinnerstet" <darryl_at_dml_techline.com>

12. Re: Mechanically Challenged
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

13. Re: Electrical problem - please help!
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>

14. Re: Toby TABs
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>

15. Re: Mechanically Challenged
From: Steve Stankiewicz <protodelorean_at_dml_yahoo.com>

16. Re: Mechanically Challenged
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>

17. Re: Delorean for Sale
From: aabclafon_at_dml_aol.com





Message: 1
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 15:44:45 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Long Term Storage

Mothballs because I have seen what little critters can do to the 
inside of a car. Try removing the smell of urine and feces and all of 
the stuff they bring in to nest, the smell of mothballs won't seem so 
bad and it does go away. 
 The blankets and cardboard because I see all too often where 
something fell on the car in storage and dented it or broke the 
windshield
 I agree that taking the weight off the wheels puts some stress on 
some parts of the suspension. I have yet to see a failed bushing that 
can be attributed to storing that way though. If the bushings do fail 
it would have more to do with age. The springs can get a "set" and 
need to be replaced too so take your pick. As far as tires, if the 
storage is really long term they should be removed from the car and 
kept in a cool dark place away from anything that could produce ozone 
like electric motors with plenty of ventilation.
Removing the battery is IMPORTANT because it quickly goes dead and 
then can freeze but what's worse it corrodes everything nearby making 
an urecognizable mess.
 Removing the anti-freeze will prevent it from turning acidic and 
corroding everything. It also becomes more of an electrolyte so it 
will cause the corrosion of the dissimilar metals with the aluminum 
dissolving first. Rice won't last long as a dessicant and will attract 
the small animals you certainly don't want. Turning the motor over 
manually once a year should keep it from freezing up from rust but in 
most of the long term cars I have seen it really wasn't the problem 
unless stored out in the weather. The fuel system, brakes and the 
exhaust systems seem to store the worst. Not much you can do about the 
exhaust but removing the fluid from the brakes and clutch should help. 
This advice comes from taking more than a couple of cars out of "long 
term storage" or at least what the owners thought was it.
The best type of storage is in a museum where it is taken care of. 
Check on how they and others store cars like the Smithstonian, they 
remove ALL of the fluids and of of course the battery.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, id <ionicdesign_at_dml_e...> wrote:
> mothballs in car, are you crazy?
> 
> i stored one of my cars for almost two years with the car on jack 
stands with mothballs
> in pie tins under each tire, under front and rear bumper and under 
each door. it took
> over 6 months to get the mothball smell out of my car and there were 
no mothballs in my
> car and all windows and doors of car were closed.
> 
> if you have any reason you might think water might be trapped 
anywhere in the car place
> a pie tin on the drivers side floor and passengers floor filled with 
some rice. the rice
> will take the humidity out of the air and it also makes salt flow 
freely in salt
> shakers.
> 
> coolant needs to be left in the engine so no rust will form inside 
engine. spray fogging
> oil in all cylinders and turn over engine once and replace spark 
plugs to keep rust from
> forming in cylinders and it keeps the piston rings oiled.
> 
> the car needs to breathe, so i wouldn't put blankets, cardboard and 
cover over car so
> mildew or mold wont form in any water trapped anywhere in car. a 
good car cover will do
> the trick, thats all.
> 
> mark
> 6683
> 
> 
> "David Teitelbaum " wrote:
> 
> > Here are my recomendations for long term storage (over 1 year)
> > Remove battery (if you can't charge it regularly or put in another 
car
> > it will go bad after a couple of years)
> > Drain ALL fluids especially the fuel and brake and clutch fluids
> > Place on jackstands to remove weight from suspension
> > Leave 10 psi in all 5 tires
> > Put mothballs under seats
> > Slobber leather conditioner on seats and steering wheel
> > Remove everything from car that doesn't belong
> > Put heavy blankets on car and a tight fitting cover over that and
> > cardboard over that.
> > Try to leave in heated garage, or at least one with a floor (a 
Carcoon
> > is probably the best).
> > Make sure the car is closed and no small animals can get into the 
garage.
> > Leave the keys and manuals in the car along with any spare parts
> > Make sure the title is in a SAFE place and you can find it
> > Don't store anything ON the car and keep heavy objects away from 
it.
> > Keep some kind of storage insurance on the car in case of theft, 
fire,
> > or damage.
> > Arrange for someone to check on the car regularly
> > All too often I have seen cars left in long-term storage completly
> > unprepared. By time the owners (or the inheritors) decided to do
> > something with the car it was way too long and unprepared. By 
doing
> > all these things you or someone else could take the car out of
> > long-term storage with a minimum of work and exploring for things 
long
> > forgotten. Too many times a car is just to be stored for the 
winter
> > and then 10 years later someone is trying to sell the car or just 
take
> > it out of storage.
> > David Teitelbaum
> > vin 10757
> >
> > --- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Delorean17_at_dml_a... wrote:
> > > Hello List,
> > >      I plan on moving to Montana when school gets out this 
spring.
> > > Unfortunately I must leave the DeLorean in Michigan at my rents
> > place.  I
> > > don't think it can make the commute up to Big Sky during the 
winter.
> > >
> > > If my car was to sit for 3-4 years. what should I do?  Will it 
be
> > necessary
> > > to completely drain the fuel system? I replaced nearly every
> > component in the
> > > fuel system exept the gas tank and fuel dist so I don't want 
that
> > going to
> > > hell again. I don't want to come back in a few years and have a 
pile
> > of sh*t
> > > again.  I plan on doing the following.
> > >
> > > Flush all coolant
> > > Amsoil Oil change
> > > Flush all brake fluid out(last done in spring)
> > > put up in air a bit(to save new shocks & tires)
> > > Drain gas?  what do you think?
> > > Detail car, condition interior
> > >
> > > Anything else I'm forgetting?
> > >
> > > Thanks
> > >
> > > Peace
> > > Dave
> > > 6286
> > >
> > >
> > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
> >
> > To address comments privately to the moderating team, please 
address:
> > moderators_at_dml_d...
> >
> > For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see 
www.dmcnews.com
> >
> > To search the archives or view files, log in at 
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
> >
> > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to 
http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/




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Message: 2
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 13:07:25 -0500
From: "Ralph Isenberg, III" <delorean1981dmc_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: Toby TABs

Hi Darryl,
Just checking to make sure I'm still on the list. Thanks!






>From: "Darryl Tinnerstet" <darryl_at_dml_techline.com>
>Reply-To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
>To: "DMCNews" <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
>CC: "Toby Peterson" <tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com>
>Subject: [DML] Toby TABs
>Date: Mon, 3 Mar 2003 22:16:59 -0800
>
>Just wanted to tell all of you who came forward and supported the effort to 
>get more Toby TAB trailing arm bolts manufactured, they came in as 
>scheduled, and were mailed out today!  As of now there are still about 20 
>sets remaining, and I seriously doubt there will be any more made.  If you 
>want some, you had better get your $66.00 check or Paypal payment in 
>pronto.  Again, thank you for your trust and support.
>
>Darryl Tinnerstet
>Specialty Automotive
>McCleary, WA
>www.delorean-parts.com
>
>
>
>[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
>To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
>moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
>
>For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see www.dmcnews.com
>
>To search the archives or view files, log in at 
>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
>
>Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/


_________________________________________________________________
STOP MORE SPAM with the new MSN 8 and get 2 months FREE*  
http://join.msn.com/?page=features/junkmail




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 3
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 11:36:08 -0500
From: Mathew Halpern <mhalpern_at_dml_tampabay.rr.com>
Subject: Mechanically Challenged

Hello,

I've been reading this list for some time now, gathering information and
insights about owning a DeLorean.  I'm not very mechanically savvy, so I'm
very impressed with the number of do-it-yourselfers.  But that also raises
concerns.  Being somewhat "mechanically-challenged", could I make a good
DeLorean owner?  Is standard maintenance (oil changes, fluids, filters,
etc.) and a passion for the D enough?  Has anyone else left the major
repairs and upgrades to a professional?

It's kinda like deciding whether to get a pet or not, isn't it?  I want to
be sure that I can provide for it and give it enough attention. :)

Mathew Halpern
Tampa, FL

--
Cool stuff for the DeLorean enthusiast:
http://www.cafeshops.com/delorean_shop




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Message: 4
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 18:12:09 -0000
From: "M. P. Olans <mpolans_at_dml_creeper.com>" <mpolans_at_dml_creeper.com>
Subject: Adjustable rear link installation

Ok, I finally got around to installing my adjustable rear links....:)
     Clarification-I only assisted, EvilDan did the work.  He came out
from NJ last week to help out with some cars here and agreed to do my
links since he had done this on his car.  The PO had lowered the car
by taking Houston's lowered springs and cutting a coil off.  For those
of you who have seen my car you know that you can't even get a finger
between the front tire and fender.  The rear would fit one finger but
the bottom of the tire was out quite a bit farther than the top giving
it a "spread leg" stance.  Ok, so here's a good learning opportunity
for me....castor or camber?  Which is which and what's negative and
positive?  I have been fortunate that you really could not see the
uneven wear on the tire, but a tread-depth indicator does reveal that
it was beginning.
     Surprisingly the installation was smooth.  We jacked up the car
and removed the wheels.  The front wheels were chocked fore with
aircraft grade chocks and standard auto parts store chocks in the
rear.  We then lowered it onto blocks.  First we loosened both link
bolts.  Then the one for the shock was removed.  Interestingly enough
the shock assembly only came down a few millimeters.  We had a second
floorjack ready to jack the spring back up for installation but we
never needed it.  Yep, I know this is dangerous and a spring
compressor should be used, but like I said in the beginning, I was
only assisting.  EvilDan was doing the major stuff.
     We matched up the adjustable links with the solid ones and then
shortened the adjustables by about 1/4 of an inch.  Well, we eyeballed
it but I don't think it could have been more than half an inch. 
Installation was pretty easy as we just kind of slipped everything
back together and tapped things into place.  The wheels went back on
and we torqued them to spec.  The we rolled the car back and forth a
bit to make sure everything was seated correctly.
     EvilDan eyeballed the alignment to get it close and then snugged
everything up to spec.  I am really glad I invested in a good torque
wrench.  Once everything settles I am going to have a 4-wheel
alignment done, but the difference is striking.  I think right now the
wheels are 0 degrees or very close.  The overall stance of the car has
improved dramatically.  It looks better from the rear.  You can now
get 2 fingers in between the tire and the quarter panel.  
     I took a lot of detailed pictures both before and after.  I'm
going to send them to Ron Wester as part of my article on my car so
hopefully the pictures will be in a future issue of Gullwing magazine.  

Adjustable links from Don Steiger-            $400 (with core charge)
EvilDan's plane ticket-                       $250 (America West)
Misc. metric sockets, wrenches, and ratchets- $200 (Craftsman and 
                                                    Husky)
2 ton floor jacks and jack stands-            $39.95 (what a deal!)
4X4 and 2X4 wood blocks from The Home Depot-  $0.59 (EvilDan drives a 
                                                     hard bargain!)
A mean rear stance and even tire wear-        Priceless


Please contact me with any questions,

Matthew
VINs 10365 and 16816




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Message: 5
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 11:06:43 -0800 (PST)
From: John Gedeon <johne_g_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Toby TABs

Being a relative newbie and not acctually owning a
delorean (Yet) what are Toby TABs and what do they
fix? and why is that important?

Thx
John
--- Darryl Tinnerstet <darryl_at_dml_techline.com> wrote:
> Just wanted to tell all of you who came forward and
> supported the effort to get more Toby TAB trailing
> arm bolts manufactured, they came in as scheduled,
> and were mailed out today!  As of now there are
> still about 20 sets remaining, and I seriously doubt
> there will be any more made.  If you want some, you
> had better get your $66.00 check or Paypal payment
> in pronto.  Again, thank you for your trust and
> support.
> 
> Darryl Tinnerstet
> Specialty Automotive
> McCleary, WA
> www.delorean-parts.com
> 
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been
> removed]
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating
> team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for
> sale see www.dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> 
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
> http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ 
> 
> 


=====
<>< Proverbs 3:5 "Trust in the Lord with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding;"



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Message: 6
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 19:44:41 -0000
From: "James LaLonde <deloreandmcxii_at_dml_excite.com>" <deloreandmcxii_at_dml_excite.com>
Subject: Re: This is so frustrating!!!

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Corey Stup <corey_at_dml_s...> wrote:
> > So, I could afford the
> > insurance, but I'd have to find a VERY considerate owner who'd 
let me
> > pay in installments, since, being 15, I can't get a loan. I know, 
I
> > shouldn't even be trying without being at least 16...
> 
> You shouldn't even be trying without being at least 25.

Corey, I'm 19.
I bought my (first) DeLorean when I was 18. (No- my parents didn't 
help-- well not monitarily. My dad's helped a lot repairing my 
cars :P )
I looked into buying one the first time right about the age of this 
young fellow... It is unrealisitc at 15 or 16.. The insurance is 
crazy on a Kia for a youthful driver.. let alone a DeLorean. And 
you'd be stupid to go without full coverage.

Unless you know them personally, NO owner will let you pay in 
installments. I doubt you'll be able to get a credit line either... 
but if so (dispite what some may say) this is the route to go. Build 
credit AND Live the Dream.
If you plan on going to college and aren't a made man (IE; inherited 
a lot of money) you can't afford DeLorean at 16-25 yrs old. Period. 
Unless your company pays for your schoolins and you have a very 
fortunate position.

Don't worry about owning a DeLorean now. SAVE MONEY... when you do go 
to buy one the 5k + downpayment will be tremondously helpful in 
getting credit.

I know what you feel like - I was there 4 years ago. And look at my 
DeLorean-owning self now (she's en route to Grady's at present).

You'll get there! Live the Dream!!
James L 4009




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Message: 7
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 20:48:14 -0000
From: "Dan C. Benedek <5n-_at_dml_gmx.net>" <5n-_at_dml_gmx.net>
Subject: Electrical problem - please help!

Last month in attempt to restore my DeLorean, the frame was removed
and refurbished. Installation of the frame went well and everything
was re-connected / re-installed. When the battery is connected, it
sparks a lot, the ground wires burned right off the body panels (rear
panels to frame,  front panels to frame). While the ignition is off
and key is not in, the cooling fans are running, the windshield wipers
are going, and the warning lights on my dash are on. This is all with
no key in the ignition. It seems the body/engine are getting a
positive feed somehow, but there are no positive wires touching
anything. If anyone can help me on how to correct this problem, please
E-mail 5n-_at_dml_gmx.net. Thank you so very much.




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Message: 8
Date: Tue, 04 Mar 2003 15:41:41 -0600
From: Gus Schlachter <gus_at_dml_austin.rr.com>
Subject: DMC+Speedbump=OUCH

I took a speedbump at a slow speed today (10MPH?) and WHACK, something didn't sound right and the steering felt loose, like I had a flat.

I walked around the car several times and bounced all the corners, but everything checked out OK so I continued my drive.  It was then I realized that, to drive straight, I had to hold the steeing wheel 45 degrees to the right, so I limped it home.  I've hit bumps, potholes, and dips WAY harder than that before.

The question becomes: what did I break?  I'm assuming what I either bent a tie-rod or mangled a suspension part.  Could I have crunched the front shock tower?  There was never any sign of rust on the frame, only minor epoxy cracking that I consider normal for a 100K+ mile car.

Doh.


Gus Schlachter
VIN #4695
Austin, TX




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Message: 9
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 18:33:59 -0700
From: "Marcel Bourgon" <mbourgon_at_dml_elp.rr.com>
Subject: Re: Toby TABs

Greetings from El Paso.
I have just placed my check in the mail for a set of toby bolts.  My baby is
now in Houston and should be back first part of May.  Thanks for heads up.
Marcel Bourgon  81 DMC
mbourgon_at_dml_elp.rr.com
915 581-6171
----- Original Message -----
From: "Darryl Tinnerstet" <darryl_at_dml_techline.com>
To: "DMCNews" <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Cc: "Toby Peterson" <tobyp_at_dml_katewwdb.com>
Sent: Monday, March 03, 2003 11:16 PM
Subject: [DML] Toby TABs


> Just wanted to tell all of you who came forward and supported the effort
to get more Toby TAB trailing arm bolts manufactured, they came in as
scheduled, and were mailed out today!  As of now there are still about 20
sets remaining, and I seriously doubt there will be any more made.  If you
want some, you had better get your $66.00 check or Paypal payment in pronto.
Again, thank you for your trust and support.
>
> Darryl Tinnerstet
> Specialty Automotive
> McCleary, WA
> www.delorean-parts.com
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>
>
>
> To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
>
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see
www.dmcnews.com
>
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
>
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
>
>




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Message: 10
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 23:15:11 EST
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: DMC+Speedbump=OUCH

In a message dated 3/4/03 10:12:38 PM Central Standard Time, 
gus_at_dml_austin.rr.com writes:


> The question becomes: what did I break?  I'm assuming what I either bent a 
> tie-rod or mangled a suspension part.  Could I have crunched the front 
> shock tower?  There was never any sign of rust on the frame, only minor 
> epoxy cracking that I consider normal for a 100K+ mile car.
> 
> Doh.

My guess is you broke a ball-joint.  they don't last forever. there are upper 
and lower ball joints on each side.

Andy
Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
1982 DeLorean DMC-12 VIN#11596
Fargo, ND 58102


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 11
Date: Tue, 4 Mar 2003 20:44:02 -0800
From: "Darryl Tinnerstet" <darryl_at_dml_techline.com>
Subject: Toby TABs

As of Tuesday night 3/4 there are only 10 Toby TAB trailing arm bolt sets left.  I need to ask folks who really want them to now call or e-mail FIRST to confirm stock, and then promptly send payment.  I will certainly refund any payments made after they are gone, but it occurred to me that if I do we will end up eating the $2.21 Paypal fee.  I'd rather not have to do that.

Darryl Tinnerstet
Specialty Automotive
McCleary, WA
www.delorean-parts.com
360-495-4640 eves.   


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 12
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 06:58:36 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: Mechanically Challenged

Like most things in life, auto mechanicing (good Southern term) is a
learned skill. Some people have an aptitude that lowers the height of
their learning curve, but I guarantee they didn't come out of the womb
with those skills. You read, you study (look at), you attempt, you
succeed, you fail, and through it all your base of knowledge and skill
grows. There are repairs I make now I could not make two years ago.
Two years from now I will make repairs I can not make now.

The secret is knowing when to say "when". Know your current level of
skill, and how much farther it can be pushed. If a repair doesn't fit
in that window: farm it out. Note that the farm can sometimes come to
your own driveway -- a tremendous learning experience (example: see
message #31340).

Despite its aura and mystique, the DeLorean is really a very
conventional automobile. Yes, it does have peculiarities, but these
are individual components or subsystems. Bulk of the car is best
turn-of-the-decade technology. 

Please note there is one major engineering aspect unique to DeLorean
that permeates the entire automobile. From bumper to bumper, top to
bottom, I have never worked on a car that has so many issues of
access. Absolutely nothing on it is easy to reach. Every car ever
built has SOMETHING difficult to grasp or turn. I've just never
encountered one where EVERYTHING is difficult. This is the greatest
reason I hesitate to recommend a DeLorean to learn mechanic skills on
(the other is cost of acquisition and parts thereafter). FWIW: in
these circumstances I've found it often helps to take JZD's name in
vain (well, it doesn't really extend the reach of your fingers or help
them bend backwards any more, but does make you feel better).

Should you nevertheless find a DeLorean in your driveway in need of
repair, by all means take full advantage of resources available. Many
vendors deal with this car exclusively, allowing you to pinpoint parts
with unbelievable speed and accuracy. These vendors are also willing
to discuss at length use and installation of those parts. DML is read
religiously and messages responded to. Fellow owners often travel
great distances to provide assistance. If you're lucky enough to live
near an owners' group or club, you have an immediate pool of
experience to draw from.

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Mathew Halpern <mhalpern_at_dml_t...> wrote:
> Hello,
> 
> I've been reading this list for some time now, gathering information and
> insights about owning a DeLorean.  I'm not very mechanically savvy,
so I'm
> very impressed with the number of do-it-yourselfers.  But that also
raises
> concerns.  Being somewhat "mechanically-challenged", could I make a good
> DeLorean owner?  Is standard maintenance (oil changes, fluids, filters,
> etc.) and a passion for the D enough?  Has anyone else left the major
> repairs and upgrades to a professional?
> 
> It's kinda like deciding whether to get a pet or not, isn't it?  I
want to
> be sure that I can provide for it and give it enough attention. :)
> 
> Mathew Halpern
> Tampa, FL
> 
> --
> Cool stuff for the DeLorean enthusiast:
> http://www.cafeshops.com/delorean_shop




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Message: 13
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 13:29:31 +0000
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>
Subject: Re: Electrical problem - please help!

My initial thoughts are as follows:

When switched off, the accessories relay earths the power supply side so all devices
connected to it will be grounded on both sides. I THINK what's happened is your
accessories are seeing 12v on their ground side - this will cause bulbs to switch on
(they don't care what way round they're connected up) and wiper motors to spin backwards
- however this will still swipe the blades as normal.

Check where the ground points are for the wipers and dash bulbs. If your engine were
getting a positive feed, you'd have a dead short and nothing would happen except a
massive spark and boiling battery.

You have connected the battery up the correct way around?

Martin
#1458
#4426

"Dan C. Benedek <5n-_at_dml_gmx.net>" wrote:

> Last month in attempt to restore my DeLorean, the frame was removed
> and refurbished. Installation of the frame went well and everything
> was re-connected / re-installed. When the battery is connected, it
> sparks a lot, the ground wires burned right off the body panels (rear
> panels to frame,  front panels to frame). While the ignition is off
> and key is not in, the cooling fans are running, the windshield wipers
> are going, and the warning lights on my dash are on. This is all with
> no key in the ignition. It seems the body/engine are getting a
> positive feed somehow, but there are no positive wires touching
> anything. If anyone can help me on how to correct this problem, please
> E-mail 5n-_at_dml_gmx.net. Thank you so very much.




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Message: 14
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 13:29:27 +0000
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>
Subject: Re: Toby TABs

Check article(s) in DMCNews tech section

Martin

John Gedeon wrote:

> Being a relative newbie and not acctually owning a
> delorean (Yet) what are Toby TABs and what do they
> fix? and why is that important?
>
> Thx
> John




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Message: 15
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 05:32:59 -0800 (PST)
From: Steve Stankiewicz <protodelorean_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Mechanically Challenged

Matthew, I'm sure there are many owners out there who
leave the major repairs up to professionals.  However,
good mechanics can be tough to find, and good
mechanics who really know Deloreans, even tougher.  I
think your proximity to a good Delorean mechanic could
make the difference between the Delorean being your
dream car or a nightmare.  Face it, it's a 20 year old
car.  Things will go wrong.  You don't wnat to have to
haul it 300 miles to the shop every time something
does.  I'd recommend talking to Delorean owners in
your area and find out where they get their work done
and what their experience has been with the shops.



=====
Steve

VIN 2650 ("Project Delorean")
www.projectdelorean.com

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Message: 16
Date: Wed, 05 Mar 2003 13:29:23 +0000
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>
Subject: Re: Mechanically Challenged

Hi Matthew

I'm personally a "have a go, Joe". This comes from my background in building robots,
where you have to think "this is what I want to do, now how the hell can I do it?" and at
some point you just have to try. With the DeLorean, if I need to, say, do the exhaust
manifold gaskets - it's just a case of diving in, and start undoing stuff till you get to
where you want to be. You might balls it up and end up spending many weekends putting
right what you've got wrong*, but this has two very useful side effects: 1) You
accumulate tools at a geometric rate and 2) you learn a hell of a lot and hopefully 3)
have a lot of fun and get a lot of satisfaction doing it.

Back to basics: The DeLorean is what I like to call a "LEGO car". It all just bolts
together and there's really very little that isn't obvious just by looking at it.

You think you're mechanically challenged? Well, if you'd like that to change, go out and
buy yourself a good socket and spanner set, a good set of screwdrivers and maybe a hammer
or two :-) Consumables like penetrating oil, silicone spray, and brake cleaner... and
just start playing.

All that said, for a 20 year old car, the DeLorean is remarkably reliable. For every hour
spent in the workshop, expect at least 20 trouble-free driving (depending ont he car of
course!). And there are very few problems that will cause a break-down.

Oh, and the DeLorean sufferes from electrical problems in common with most British cars
of that age.

* drilled into a water way on one head and ended up sourcing a new head and replacing it,
and the water pump, and spark plugs etc etc etc. Goes very well now!

Martin
#1458
#4426

Mathew Halpern wrote:

> Hello,
>
> I've been reading this list for some time now, gathering information and
> insights about owning a DeLorean.  I'm not very mechanically savvy, so I'm
> very impressed with the number of do-it-yourselfers.  But that also raises
> concerns.  Being somewhat "mechanically-challenged", could I make a good
> DeLorean owner?  Is standard maintenance (oil changes, fluids, filters,
> etc.) and a passion for the D enough?  Has anyone else left the major
> repairs and upgrades to a professional?
>
> It's kinda like deciding whether to get a pet or not, isn't it?  I want to
> be sure that I can provide for it and give it enough attention. :)
>
> Mathew Halpern
> Tampa, FL




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Message: 17
Date: Wed, 5 Mar 2003 09:52:44 EST
From: aabclafon_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Delorean for Sale

I am sadden by the fact I must sell my Delorean.

Year: 1981 
Vin:    2578
Miles:  26,492
Gas Flap Hood
Black Interior - Good Condition
Rear Louvres and door struts are o.k.
Heat/Air AM/FM and cassette works
Almost a complete set of Delorean World Magazines.
Damage to driver side mirror.
Runs good  2.85 liter V6 Engine.

My D needs a good home.

Do to financial situation I must depart with my Delorean.   D is located in 
Brownsburg, Indiana right next door to Indianapolis, Indiana.    Would like to
sell for $14,000.   

Please respond to:   aabclafon_at_dml_aol.com

Thanks
David L.



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