From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 1470
Date: Monday, April 21, 2003 3:35 AM

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There are 18 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: A few brake questions
From: "robert parker" <roberthparker_at_dml_hotmail.com>

2. Re: Diamond headlights
From: "Harold McElraft" <hmcelraft_at_dml_aol.com>

3. Gas Flap Hood
From: Bob Brandys <BobB_at_dml_safety-epa.com>

4. Re: Re: Need a good laugh?
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>

5. Re: "False Air" = "Vacuum Leak"
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

6. Update#3. Re: Failed Emissions Inspection. AGAIN!!!!!
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

7. Re: Gas Flap Hood
From: Vin 5386 <delorean_stainless_at_dml_yahoo.com>

8. Re: Headgasket job
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

9. Re: "False Air" = "Vacuum Leak"
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

10. Re: Temperature Guage help
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

11. Update#3. Re: Failed Emissions Inspection. AGAIN!!!!!
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

12. RE: Need a good laugh?
From: Dick Ryan <deloreanbiker_at_dml_yahoo.com>

13. Re: Headgasket job
From: webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk

14. Looking for Bob Miller
From: kKoncelik_at_dml_aol.com

15. Front Rotor Replacement
From: Delorean17_at_dml_aol.com

16. Paint for louver
From: Delorean17_at_dml_aol.com

17. Re: Temperature Guage help
From: "Eric Itzel" <eric_at_dml_seviernet.com>

18. Re: Re: Headgasket job/Engine lift if anyone needs
From: Vin 5386 <delorean_stainless_at_dml_yahoo.com>





Message: 1
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 06:07:06 +0000
From: "robert parker" <roberthparker_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: A few brake questions

I have '78 Capri disc pads on the front ($5.99); don't know why the calipers 
wouldn't be interchangable, unless there is a size discrepancy.  Good luck.  
    Drive Stainless    Robert VIN 6924






From: "L. Sandel" <ls_at_dml_chickencow.csv.cmich.edu>
Reply-To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] A few brake questions
Date: Wed, 16 Apr 2003 20:43:46 -0400

Hello all,

I'm currently changing out the front brakes, and had a few issues crop up
during the procedure.

I was planning on fixing up the calipers with new seals.  One of the pistons
had almost seized, and the others weren't moving too freely.  This made
stopping an awkward & noisy process.

First issue: I separated the calipers to facilitate the rebuilding process.
Then I noticed the note in the shop manual that says something like "do not
ever even think about separating the calipers".  It this a genuine concern?
If not, are there recommended torque values for the bolts?

Second issue: I'm not sure what constitutes a bad caliper piston/bore from a
good one... So I took a few pictures:

http://labwww.csv.cmich.edu/luke/auto/Delorean/brakes/caliper.jpg (72k)
http://labwww.csv.cmich.edu/luke/auto/Delorean/brakes/caliperpiston.jpg
(44k)

All of the calipers look like the one pictured, but the piston shown is the
worst of the bunch (which doesn't seem too bad).  The caliper bores are
smooth to the touch.

So, are these salvageable, or should I order in some new ones?

Anybody actually used the 76 Capri calipers?  They're only $70 at Murrays...
Much easier on the wallet than most sources.

Thanks for any help,
Luke/10270




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Message: 2
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 12:10:19 -0000
From: "Harold McElraft" <hmcelraft_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: Diamond headlights

Matthew
I believe the pigtail comes with all Hella H4 steups. All the ones I 
have seen at least. I put Hella H4's in my car and the pigtail was 
in the box. You need them to get the bulb configuration to work 
correctly. Since they were in the box I purchased I would also 
expect them to be available from Hella.

Harold McElraft - 3354


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "M. P. Olans" <mpolans_at_dml_c...> wrote:
> Greetings all,
>      Did anyone see the auction on ebay that just ended for the
> DeLorean diamond H4 headlight conversion?  This user had wire 
pigtails
> that would allow the low/high beams to work correctly.  I emailed 
the
> user "trendracing" but the user would not respond and banned me 
from
> bidding on the item.  Does anyone have access to these pigtails or
> know where i could ge a set for my car?
> 
> Thanks,
> Matthew
> VINs 10365 annd 16816




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 3
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 10:23:37 -0500
From: Bob Brandys <BobB_at_dml_safety-epa.com>
Subject: Gas Flap Hood

John,

I am not sure who it was who raised the question about the gas flap.  I 
am the person who put one on my hood.

The reason I did it was because I have had the wind blow the hood down 
on my hand when putting in gas.  Not a fun experience.  I also did it 
because I don't want to advertise what it stored in my bonnet.

Sure you can by a hood with a gas flap, but they are hard to find and 
relatively expensive.

Lastly, I did it (as well as the rest of the 97 DeLorean) because it was 
the technical challenge of can it be done.

BOB




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 4
Date: Sat, 19 Apr 2003 12:35:44 -0400
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>
Subject: Re: Re: Need a good laugh?

eh?  There is such thing as magnesium wheels.  Or more specifically
magnesium RIMS.  They're expensive, and magnesium is quite stable as a
large piece of metal.  Magnesium shavings are very flammable, but it
takes a lot of heat (like an all out car fire or more) to ignite a large
piece of magnesium.

Magnesium TIRES are harder to come by, but would probably put on quite a
show.

Jim


On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 03:53:10 -0000 "Adam" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com> writes:
> Magnesium wheels... everyone's wheels would be on fire!
> 
> Adam P
> 16683
>


________________________________________________________________
The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 5
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 16:53:43 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: "False Air" = "Vacuum Leak"

You ask a very good question, Where does the air come from for the
idle speed motor? A quick look at the picture on D:05:01 gives a
simple answer. The idle speed motor bypasses the THROTTLE PLATES not
the air sensor. An air leak in this circuit not only upsets the air
fuel ratio but also causes a loss of speed control by the idle circuit
and the throttle plates. This is a very important reason the air tube
going into the mixture unit underneath must not leak at the "O" ring
seal. If there are no vacuum leaks then all of the air the idle system
gets is measured by the air sensor plate.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_j...>
wrote:
> What about the idle speed regulator?  Doesn't it add air that isn't
> measured by the air sensor plate?
> 
> Jim
> 
> 
> On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 03:58:24 -0000 "content22207"
> <brobertson_at_dml_c...> writes:
> > Another term for "false air" is "vacuum leak". With the exception of
> > PCV, *EVERY* ounce of air that enters your engine should pass over
> > (and activate) the air sensor plate. Is the only way to meter fuel.
> > Any air entering via injector seals, bad hoses, old O rings or
> > gaskets, etc will throw fuel/air mixture off. Is often much more 
> > than
> > minor inconvenience: impossible idle, poor acceleration, excessive
> > fuel consumption, dirty combustion (how many times do problems like
> > these crop up on list?). Can not stress enough importance of 
> > ensuring
> > entire upper half of engine is air tight. Good news: is easily 
> > within
> > capabilities of every owner to at least isolate a leak. Just don't
> > take any seals for granted on a 22 year old block...
> > 
> > Bill Robertson
> > #5939
> 
> 
> ________________________________________________________________
> The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
> Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
> Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 6
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 16:57:19 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Update#3. Re: Failed Emissions Inspection. AGAIN!!!!!

>From your description you might also consider vacuum leaks causing the
fuel mixture to be different on each cylinder. Replace the injector seals.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


-- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "therealdmcvegas" <DMCVegas_at_dml_l...> wrote:
> I realize that "Mechanic in a Bottle" doesn't exist. What I was
looking for was 
> "Bribe in a Bottle" to pass the emissions testing! ;-p Of course I
am admittedly 
> kicking my self twice over now. 1: I wasted money, and 2. The
disclaimer for 
> the "Will allow your car to pass, or double your money back!*" *Only 
> guaranted on vehicles with properly funtioning emissions, and fuel
systems. 
> Doh!
> 
> Anywho. I pulled the sparkplugs, and have discovered that plugs 1-3
show 
> normal characteristics, although 4&5 had much less carbon on them. This 
> could be due to the detergents and solvents that were run thru, I
don't know. 
> And then we come to plug #6, which was dry fowled. Unlike the others
plugs, 
> on this one the only place where carbon deposits had not covered
anything 
> was on the tips of the electrodes where the spark was arcing.
Although on a 
> side note, the ceramic insulater on the OUTSIDE of plug #5 is severly 
> yellowed on the bottom. This is the crooked plug as well, if that
makes a 
> difference.
> 
> So now I know for certain that this is a problem with the fuel
delivery system. 
> The gap ranges were varied on the plugs (between .27-.35), but this
plug was 
> literally middle of the road _at_dml_ .32, compared to the others, which
were clean. I 
> still need to test the spray patterns & output volumes (need one
more jar). But 
> based upon the CIS theory, I would assume that injector #6 is
clogged, which 
> not just fowled the plug, but caused a rich condition in the
remaining 5 
> cylinders due to the lack of it's own proper fuel displacement. So
now I'd like 
> to clean the injectors. But as it turns out, my local official BOSCH
service 
> center can't do, since their machine is broken. So I'm off to find
someone who 
> can...




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 7
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 09:57:50 -0700 (PDT)
From: Vin 5386 <delorean_stainless_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Gas Flap Hood

I think Bob did a good job and shows that we all can
have a gas flap even if you didn't get it with the
hood. I also think personally it is really stupid to
have to lift the entire hood up every time you want to
put gas in your D. I'm excited about the idea :D

Todd
Vin 5386
--- Bob Brandys <BobB_at_dml_safety-epa.com> wrote:
> John,
> 
> I am not sure who it was who raised the question
> about the gas flap.  I 
> am the person who put one on my hood.
> 
> The reason I did it was because I have had the wind
> blow the hood down 
> on my hand when putting in gas.  Not a fun
> experience.  I also did it 
> because I don't want to advertise what it stored in
> my bonnet.
> 
> Sure you can by a hood with a gas flap, but they are
> hard to find and 
> relatively expensive.
> 
> Lastly, I did it (as well as the rest of the 97
> DeLorean) because it was 
> the technical challenge of can it be done.
> 
> BOB
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating
> team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for
> sale see www.dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> 
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
> http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ 
> 
> 


=====
For up to the minute details on the restoration of Vin5386 point your browser to, http://www.khpindustries.com/stainlessrestorations.html

__________________________________________________
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The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo
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________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 8
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 17:12:12 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Headgasket job

The special tool for the timing chain is to maintain tension on the
timing chain to maintain timing. Without it you will have to remove
the timing cover which means removal of the engine from the car. Refer
to C:05:04 for complete explanation.
 Expect some trouble with removing the exhaust manifolds, The hardware
during normal use is subjected to high temperatures and extreme
cycling of temperatures which causes the hardware to "freeze" in place
especially because of dissimilar materiels and different coeficints of
expansion and contraction. The best way to get them loose is with an
acetalyne torch to heat up the hardware before trying to remove it.
 Without the timing chain tool you should figure on removing the whole
engine, transmission, exhaust system. It is not that big a deal once
you get the rear facia off. Of course this assumes you have a good
place to work and some tools and an engine lift (which you can rent).
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "cruznmd" <racuti1_at_dml_d...> wrote:
> Since my "critical engine failure", I've been forced to accept the 
> realities of my budget, and replace the head gaskets in place. I have 
> a few questions before I get started:
> 
> 1.  The workshop manual shows a special tool to hold up the timing 
> sprocket. Do I have to have this tool or is there another safer way?
> 2.  My exhaust manifolds are not in great shape and I don't want to 
> damage them anymore. Can I just disconnect them from the muffler and 
> the "U" pipe and leave them attached to the heads?
> 3.  I have been told that removing the manifolds is "easy" by some 
> folks on list. #5335 has been in a very damp environment for years 
> and the nuts and studs are fused together by rust. I don't even see 
> how I can get at them all without removing the engine even if they 
> weren't rusted. Is there something I don't know?
> 4.  In short, can this job be done with the engine in place or should 
> I be removing it?
> 
> Thanks,
> Rich
> #5335




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 9
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 17:15:29 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: "False Air" = "Vacuum Leak"

Nope. Air passes over sensor plate, under fuel distributor, then thru
cold start tube. Idle speed motor bypasses throttle plates (and the
built in manual idle speed circuit -- sorry, couldn't resist).
Basically serves same function as variably cracking throttle plates. 

Only unmetered air is (should be) PCV. Contemporary engines obviously
designed for it. If you disconnect (or if your PCV valve stops working
on a car so equipped), performance and fuel economy will go down.

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_j...>
wrote:
> What about the idle speed regulator?  Doesn't it add air that isn't
> measured by the air sensor plate?
> 
> Jim
> 
> 
> On Sat, 19 Apr 2003 03:58:24 -0000 "content22207"
> <brobertson_at_dml_c...> writes:
> > Another term for "false air" is "vacuum leak". With the exception of
> > PCV, *EVERY* ounce of air that enters your engine should pass over
> > (and activate) the air sensor plate. Is the only way to meter fuel.
> > Any air entering via injector seals, bad hoses, old O rings or
> > gaskets, etc will throw fuel/air mixture off. Is often much more 
> > than
> > minor inconvenience: impossible idle, poor acceleration, excessive
> > fuel consumption, dirty combustion (how many times do problems like
> > these crop up on list?). Can not stress enough importance of 
> > ensuring
> > entire upper half of engine is air tight. Good news: is easily 
> > within
> > capabilities of every owner to at least isolate a leak. Just don't
> > take any seals for granted on a 22 year old block...
> > 
> > Bill Robertson
> > #5939
> 
> 
> ________________________________________________________________
> The best thing to hit the internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
> Surf the web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
> Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 10
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 17:22:29 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Temperature Guage help

The sender unit on the front right side of the engine does ground the
wire from the gauge. It does this internaly to the metal of the engine
and varies the resistance proportionaly to the temperature of the
engine. The first thing to do would be to make sure the wire is still
attached to the sender but if you haven't been in that area my guess
is the problem is under the dashboard and not the sender unit on the
motor. If the wire is attached a "quick and dirty" test is to, with
the key on, have someone watch the guage and just touch the wire to
ground for a second and see if the gauge responds. If it doesn't then
the problem is either the wire or the guage. If it does move then the
problem is either a loose connection to the sender or a bad sender. DO
NOT GROUND THE WIRE FOR TOO LONG, IT WILL BURN UP THE GUAGE!
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "James LaLonde" <deloreandmcxii_at_dml_e...>
wrote:
> I just got done checking my fuel pump circuit and ended up replacing 
> the fuel pump... I was stuck on the side of the road, so I had 
> checked both the inertia switch and the pump relay. both of which 
> eneded up being fine... as once I got home I found that I had power 
> at the pump.
> 
> But I get everything in the rat's nest behind my passenger seat, and 
> everything under the dash and at the pump put back together... but 
> now my Temperature guage is pegged straigtt down. Apparently my 
> coolant is -80 degrees... perhaps that's too cold :P
> 
> My thought is that's it's either come unplugged at the sender or at 
> some point in between. Looking at my miniscule wiring diagram it 
> looks likes it's gounnded right after the guage... am I reading that 
> right? Where is it grounded? And where is the sender? Is it the one 
> on the block on the passeger side near the hot water valve?
> 
> Any suggestions on where to check? what to do?
> thanks!!!
> James L 004009




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 11
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 17:34:02 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Update#3. Re: Failed Emissions Inspection. AGAIN!!!!!

If plug #6 has soot deposits (they are dry?), it is getting fuel. It
just isn't burning it very well. 

1) Do a compression test on cylinder #6 (you want to compare to the
other cylinders). If it differs significantly, you've got ring
problems or an oval shaped cylinder.

2) Make sure cylinder #6 threads aren't cross threaded or otherwise
damaged by "crooked" plug. You need a tight fit for compression.

3) Once you've installed some decent new plugs (c'mon, they're only
$7-$8 a set), use a timing light at the plug to see how it's firing.

4) Observe injector #6 spray pattern. All you need is one empty coke
bottle. Use the procedure in message #32067, less actual screw
adjustment (don't forget to plug the empty injector port!).

That should be enough to keep you busy on a Sunday afternoon. Let us
know what you find...

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "therealdmcvegas" <DMCVegas_at_dml_l...> wrote:
> I realize that "Mechanic in a Bottle" doesn't exist. What I was
looking for was 
> "Bribe in a Bottle" to pass the emissions testing! ;-p Of course I
am admittedly 
> kicking my self twice over now. 1: I wasted money, and 2. The
disclaimer for 
> the "Will allow your car to pass, or double your money back!*" *Only 
> guaranted on vehicles with properly funtioning emissions, and fuel
systems. 
> Doh!
> 
> Anywho. I pulled the sparkplugs, and have discovered that plugs 1-3
show 
> normal characteristics, although 4&5 had much less carbon on them. This 
> could be due to the detergents and solvents that were run thru, I
don't know. 
> And then we come to plug #6, which was dry fowled. Unlike the others
plugs, 
> on this one the only place where carbon deposits had not covered
anything 
> was on the tips of the electrodes where the spark was arcing.
Although on a 
> side note, the ceramic insulater on the OUTSIDE of plug #5 is severly 
> yellowed on the bottom. This is the crooked plug as well, if that
makes a 
> difference.
> 
> So now I know for certain that this is a problem with the fuel
delivery system. 
> The gap ranges were varied on the plugs (between .27-.35), but this
plug was 
> literally middle of the road _at_dml_ .32, compared to the others, which
were clean. I 
> still need to test the spray patterns & output volumes (need one
more jar). But 
> based upon the CIS theory, I would assume that injector #6 is
clogged, which 
> not just fowled the plug, but caused a rich condition in the
remaining 5 
> cylinders due to the lack of it's own proper fuel displacement. So
now I'd like 
> to clean the injectors. But as it turns out, my local official BOSCH
service 
> center can't do, since their machine is broken. So I'm off to find
someone who 
> can...




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 12
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 11:00:22 -0700 (PDT)
From: Dick Ryan <deloreanbiker_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: RE: Need a good laugh?

Hey, #OG2

I think that you think that "Ryan" was me, but it
wasn't!!!!!!

Do keep in mind that all DeLoreans did NOT come with
the switch to make the wings flap.  That is an
optional aftermarket device called WingZilla.

Dick "OG#4" Ryan



--- Murray Fisher <murrayf_at_dml_charter.net> wrote:
> Gee Ryan,
> 	I would think a guy as old as YOU would have long
> ago seen the removable
> roof wings.    You probably haven't even found the
> switch that makes them
> flap so you can take off and fly over traffic!!!
> 	Murray  OG#2
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating
> team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for
> sale see www.dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> 
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
> http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ 
> 
> 


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The New Yahoo! Search - Faster. Easier. Bingo
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________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 13
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 20:04:16 +0000
From: webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk
Subject: Re: Headgasket job

Hi Rich,

> 1.  The workshop manual shows a special tool to hold up the timing
> sprocket. Do I have to have this tool or is there another safer way?

This tool is unneccessary, and you'd need two if doing both heads at once. Spend an extra couple of hours and take the time to change the timing chains too. That tool allows you to retain tension in the chain tensioners, but with the timing cover off you can get to them easily to ratchet them back out.


> 2.  My exhaust manifolds are not in great shape and I don't want to
> damage them anymore. Can I just disconnect them from the muffler and
> the "U" pipe and leave them attached to the heads?

Errrm, yes, but you'd be wasting a golden opportunity to get those sorted too. Stud extraction isn't nearly so much hassle if the head's on the workbench :-)

> 3.  I have been told that removing the manifolds is "easy" by some
> folks on list. #5335 has been in a very damp environment for years
> and the nuts and studs are fused together by rust. I don't even see
> how I can get at them all without removing the engine even if they
> weren't rusted. Is there something I don't know?

Quite a lot it would seem - but I was like that before getting my hands dirty and trying the job. All studs are accessible though you have to remove the starter motor to get to the right hand set. The hard part is removing the old studs from the heads, not getting the manifolds off. Just use a 6-point 11mm socket (don't be tempted by a 12 point otherwise you might find yourself having to smack a smaller socket on with a hammer after you've rounded the nut off - I did). Don't worry about the nuts coming off - if you shear the studs they will almost certainly shear with 1/2" sticking out and plenty to get an extractor on once the head's off.

> 4.  In short, can this job be done with the engine in place or should
> I be removing it?

It can be done in place. Once the exhaust's off there's no real advantage apart from maybe getting an air-wrench on the crankshaft nut (if removing timing cover).

NB in the instructions for timing chain replacement, the workshop manual is copied from Renault or Volvo because Left and Right are transposed in the instructions. The diagrams will make it obvious however.

Martin
#1458
#4426
Recent head and exhaust gasket job on #2292




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Message: 14
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 20:53:14 EDT
From: kKoncelik_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Looking for Bob Miller

Bob 
Can you contact me privately by e-mail 
thanks

Ken


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 15
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 20:58:42 EDT
From: Delorean17_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Front Rotor Replacement

Hi List,
       Today I finally decided to replace my warped rotors since prom is 
friday.  Both hubs came off fairly easily but the bearings pretty much fell 
apart when I pressed the hub off the shaft.  I wanted to replace the front 
bearings anyway as one was making a little noise.
       I have never installed rotors or bearings before but it doesnt seem 
too hard.  How should I go about installing the front bearings into the hub?  
Should I have a machine shop press them in or is this something I could do?  
any info on the assembly of the front hub/rotor would be appreciated.

Thank You


Dave,
#6286


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Message: 16
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 21:05:23 EDT
From: Delorean17_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Paint for louver

Hi,
      I am going to paint my rear louver on Wednesday.  I tried Bondo "bumper 
black" a while ago and it looked good for about 1 summer, then it started to 
fade really fast & looked like hell.  I am considering painting it with some 
type of textured bedliner.  Has anyone else tried this?  What brand do you 
recommend.  I know some bedliner sprays are too dull in color and wouldn't 
look good.
    
Thank You

Dave
#6286


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Message: 17
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 22:06:17 -0400
From: "Eric Itzel" <eric_at_dml_seviernet.com>
Subject: Re: Temperature Guage help

Hey James

A problem very similar to yours happened to me a few months ago. The last
thing I did before my gauge went wacky was to free the passageway from the
floor vent where the carpet was blocking it.

My gauge was off for about a week, then it healed itself. It hasn't done it
since (until, of course, I sit back down in my car after I type this
message!).

I'm curious about this too, and would like to know what to do if it happens
to me again.

Thanks

Eric Itzel
vin 4433

----- Original Message -----
From: "James LaLonde" <deloreandmcxii_at_dml_excite.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Saturday, April 19, 2003 9:52 AM
Subject: [DML] Temperature Guage help


> I just got done checking my fuel pump circuit and ended up replacing
> the fuel pump... I was stuck on the side of the road, so I had
> checked both the inertia switch and the pump relay. both of which
> eneded up being fine... as once I got home I found that I had power
> at the pump.
>
> But I get everything in the rat's nest behind my passenger seat, and
> everything under the dash and at the pump put back together... but
> now my Temperature guage is pegged straigtt down. Apparently my
> coolant is -80 degrees... perhaps that's too cold :P
>
> My thought is that's it's either come unplugged at the sender or at
> some point in between. Looking at my miniscule wiring diagram it
> looks likes it's gounnded right after the guage... am I reading that
> right? Where is it grounded? And where is the sender? Is it the one
> on the block on the passeger side near the hot water valve?
>
> Any suggestions on where to check? what to do?
> thanks!!!
> James L 004009
>
>
>
> To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
>
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see
www.dmcnews.com
>
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
>
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
>




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Message: 18
Date: Sun, 20 Apr 2003 19:13:24 -0700 (PDT)
From: Vin 5386 <delorean_stainless_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Re: Headgasket job/Engine lift if anyone needs

If anybody is close to me in NEPA and needs an engine
lift for a few weeks or something I do have one to
borrow. they can get pricy if you rent one over a week
or something. I'd just need it back after you were
done lol. Just thought Id throw that out there.

Todd
Vin 5386
--- David Teitelbaum <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net> wrote:
> The special tool for the timing chain is to maintain
> tension on the
> timing chain to maintain timing. Without it you will
> have to remove
> the timing cover which means removal of the engine
> from the car. Refer
> to C:05:04 for complete explanation.
>  Expect some trouble with removing the exhaust
> manifolds, The hardware
> during normal use is subjected to high temperatures
> and extreme
> cycling of temperatures which causes the hardware to
> "freeze" in place
> especially because of dissimilar materiels and
> different coeficints of
> expansion and contraction. The best way to get them
> loose is with an
> acetalyne torch to heat up the hardware before
> trying to remove it.
>  Without the timing chain tool you should figure on
> removing the whole
> engine, transmission, exhaust system. It is not that
> big a deal once
> you get the rear facia off. Of course this assumes
> you have a good
> place to work and some tools and an engine lift
> (which you can rent).
> David Teitelbaum
> vin 10757
> 
> 
> 
> --- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "cruznmd"
> <racuti1_at_dml_d...> wrote:
> > Since my "critical engine failure", I've been
> forced to accept the 
> > realities of my budget, and replace the head
> gaskets in place. I have 
> > a few questions before I get started:
> > 
> > 1.  The workshop manual shows a special tool to
> hold up the timing 
> > sprocket. Do I have to have this tool or is there
> another safer way?
> > 2.  My exhaust manifolds are not in great shape
> and I don't want to 
> > damage them anymore. Can I just disconnect them
> from the muffler and 
> > the "U" pipe and leave them attached to the heads?
> > 3.  I have been told that removing the manifolds
> is "easy" by some 
> > folks on list. #5335 has been in a very damp
> environment for years 
> > and the nuts and studs are fused together by rust.
> I don't even see 
> > how I can get at them all without removing the
> engine even if they 
> > weren't rusted. Is there something I don't know?
> > 4.  In short, can this job be done with the engine
> in place or should 
> > I be removing it?
> > 
> > Thanks,
> > Rich
> > #5335
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating
> team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for
> sale see www.dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> 
> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
> http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ 
> 
> 


=====
For up to the minute details on the restoration of Vin5386 point your browser to, http://www.khpindustries.com/stainlessrestorations.html

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