From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 1792
Date: Wednesday, December 17, 2003 7:16 AM

There are 15 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Heritage of 7x1mm Bolts on PRV?
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

2. Re: Corrado I inspected the Eugene car.
From: "Adam 16683" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>

3. Squishy Brakes. Continued.
From: "therealdmcvegas" <DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com>

4. Re: Heritage of 7x1mm Bolts on PRV?
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net

5. Re: Squishy Brakes. Continued.
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net

6. Re: wheel color
From: Paul Gress <pgress_at_dml_pb.net>

7. Re: Heritage of 7x1mm Bolts on PRV?
From: "Elvis Nocita" <elvisnocita_at_dml_gmx.de>

8. Fridge Run Update
From: "Andrei Cular" <acular_at_dml_tampabay.rr.com>

9. Starting problems Part 2
From: jettaman95_at_dml_yahoo.com

10. DeLorean Performance Ignition Kit
From: James Espey <james_at_dml_usadmc.com>

11. Re: wheel color (powder coating process)
From: rich_at_dml_outernet-tech.net

12. Re: Squishy Brakes. Continued.
From: abbotts_at_dml_aardvark.net.au

13. Re: "French" PRV
From: brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net

14. RE: Re: TOBY-TAB update
From: "K. Creason" <dmc4687_at_dml_mindspring.com>

15. Re: Re: wheel color (powder coating process)
From: kKoncelik_at_dml_aol.com





Message: 1
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 05:31:50 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: Heritage of 7x1mm Bolts on PRV?

PRV is a very old design (1971). At that time 7x1mm may have been
common. Perhaps a metric old-timer can verify.

8x1mm thread on banjo bolts is also rare now.

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_d...> wrote:
> Correct. Even over here M7 is a "funny" size. M3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10 and 12 
> are all commonplace.
> 





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Message: 2
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 05:36:38 -0000
From: "Adam 16683" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: Corrado I inspected the Eugene car.

I went to Eugene and inspected the car. I was surprised to see that 
it is an 83 and manufactured in the same month as my car with very 
close vin numbers. My vin is 16683. 

I took a look at the auction on ebay as well and the seller is very 
honest about this car. They include many photos and much information. 
I wasnt able to take photos of my own, however, here is what I 
gathered from my inspection: 

The front fascia is straight! No "eyebrows" at all.
Underside of front fascia is missing 2 bolts, not a serious issue.
The front sway bar is missing almost all of its coating and has a lot
of surface rust. The bar is solid however.

At the front right wheel one of the tow-hooks is bent downwards, 
along with a small triangular section if sheet metal that it is 
attached to from the corner of the frame where the crumble tube 
extension connects to the main frame. Where it ripped free and bent 
is rusted. It didnt look severe, and I believe that this could be 
fixed relatively easily by cutting out the bad part and welding in a 
small peice of metal. Or maybe it could be cleaned and bent back into 
position and welded.. But even bent as it is, the car is drivable. It 
looks to be minor damage. 

The car still has the plastic coolant bottle, and the original "bosch 
blue" ignition coil. 
Weather stripping is all intact, but needs reglued around the drivers 
door.

The rear fascia is warped/melted towards the bottom exactly in the 
center, apparently from muffler heat. This is visible in the photos 
but easy to miss. Not too serious in my opinion.

Wheels have a normal amount of wear/scuffing, except the front right 
wheel which is scuffed all the way around the outside edge. 

A small piece of carpet is peeling off from the trunk bonnet. But 
other than that the trunk area is very clean and carpet is good 
except the small section i mentioned.

The shifter boot is super worn and should be replaced.

All headliners are in great shape! No sagging or holes, etc.

The carpeting is worn in some places, the biggest spot is in the 
passenger door sill, there is about a 3 inch bald spot.

The center console is in great condition and all the various buttons 
work like new! Has original stock ASI radio.

The instrument cluster binnacle has a normal amount of sun damage on 
top with a moderate crack on top.

The car fires right up and idles like a champ!! I havent heard too 
many other deloreans (3 total now) but this car idled smooth as can 
be, better than my own car. 

All things considered, in my opinion the car is good for the price 
you are paying. I also paid $12,000 for mine, but yours is in better 
shape. In fact it is better all around than my own car! I was 
considering a trade in. >8^)

One other thing, the people at Eugene Executive Auto are worried 
about the auction. The are concerned that they have had minimal 
contact with you and really want a phone call. 

I hope the info I provided will help you!

Adam Price
vin 16683




--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Adam 16683" <acprice1_at_dml_h...> wrote:
> Corrado and Elvis, you both post about viewing a car in Eugene. Is 
> this the same car? I live in Hillsboro which is close enough to 
> Eugene. I will look at the car(s) for you but I am somewhat of a 
> novice. I am a beginner but i have had my Delorean for almost two 
> years now. I can at least tell you if it runs normally, has idle 
> problems, etc. I will do my best with the frame inspection. 
> 
> If someone more experienced will look at the car that would be 
> better. But i will check it out on monday or tuesdsay, and get back 
> to you.
> 
> Adam Price
> Hillsboro, OR



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Message: 3
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 11:06:46 -0000
From: "therealdmcvegas" <DMCVegas_at_dml_lvcm.com>
Subject: Squishy Brakes. Continued.

Here is a bit more information to answer questions asked.

System wasn't just bled, but was power-flushed until fluid was clear, and all 
air bubbles were gone. Which took almost 4 large bottles of GTLMA (old fluid 
was BLACK). Also, the condition is the same, regardless of temperature. It can 
be a warm afternoon, or cold enough that I've had to scrape ice off the 
windscreen (last Saturday night), and the condition is the exact same.

Also, the fluid level inside the reservoir appears to be fine. When first filled, 
the fluid touched both fill marks on either side, and a litte of the top of the 
reservoir. Now, the level is slightly below, but if I tilt the reservoir from side to 
side, the fluid will touch the "Full" marks on the top.

Glazing is most likely present, but not the root cause. The problem aside from 
fade is that the brakes don't "grab" until the pedal is much farther down. 
However, if you pump the pedal twice in rapid succession, the pedal "grabs" 
much earlier. Although, the new brake fade is still present, it should remain 
consistant, and should not be affected by pumping, which it is not. The main 
concern is the "grabbing".

I've not been able to fully test for pull when braking. However, no force has 
been noticed, and the car still feels and appears to be stopping in a straight 
line. However, the front rotors are warped, so I'll need to find a set of calipers 
to measure their thickness. Hopefully I'll have enough material left to turn 'em 
so they'll be corrected, but that's another subject.

At this point, I'm more than convinced that the problem is hydraulic. But 
wheather the issue is: 1. Blown seal(s) in new M/C, 2. Blown inner seal on 
caliper(s), or 3. swelling brake hoses, I don't know. Or perhaps a combination 
of one or more (these are the only things that I can think of that would cause 
such a sudden pressure loss, and fit with my symptoms). Plus, gut instinct tells 
me that I can't just replace the brake hoses, and leave the old calipers in 
place. While it may be an unfounded fear, I'm not comfortable with forcing 
more pressure on who-knows-how-old caliper seals with new SS Braided 
hoses installed. And rather than replace a couple of seals, I'd also rather just 
swap out for fresh rebuilt units (I don't trust old equipment).

Thanks again to everyone!

-Robert
vin 6585 "X"




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Message: 4
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 15:34:04 -0000
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net
Subject: Re: Heritage of 7x1mm Bolts on PRV?

You mention "heritage". Just remember this IS a FRENCH engine. Need I
have to say more? BTW the banjo bolts would be Bosch, they did the
fuel system. The hardware is not all that hard to get, you just can't
get it in the local hardware store.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_c...> wrote:
> PRV is a very old design (1971). At that time 7x1mm may have been
> common. Perhaps a metric old-timer can verify.
> 
> 8x1mm thread on banjo bolts is also rare now.
> 
> 




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Message: 5
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 15:53:44 -0000
From: jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net
Subject: Re: Squishy Brakes. Continued.

I don't always trust "power flushing" on all cars. I have tried
reverse bleeding, power bleeding, flushing, you name it, not every
method works on all cars. The one method that works on all cars
(except cars with ABS where there is a special procedure) is to have 2
people do it using the pedal and the other person bleeds one wheel at
a time starting with the left front, then right front, then left rear
and finish with right rear. It may have to be repeated several times.
Flushing doesn't use pressure, just flow. Doing it this way using
pressure forces the air out under pressure like the gas in soda. I
don't like using the one person bleeder, air can get sucked back in at
the bleeder valve, it is not an air tight seal. I can usually talk
someone into helping me for the 5-10 min it can take to do. I can also
inspect the hoses as I bleed so if a brake hose balloons under
pressure I can see it. This can cause "squishy brakes". More
accurately it is called "soft pedal". If you step on the pedal and it
keeps falling as you hold your foot on it, it is called "falling
pedal" and usually means a leak. Since you aren't adding brake fluid
you would have "soft pedal" which usually means air in the system
(works like a spring inside because the air is compressible) or the
other possability is a brake hose that has a weak spot in it and
bulges under pressure. A remote possablitily (you say you replaced the
master cylinder) is bad seals inside the master cylinder and the
pressure escapes back into the resovoir. If you have to add brake
fluid you have a leak no matter if you can see it or not. Check the
inside of the vacuum hose to the booster. Sometimes the seals fail in
such a manner that the brake fluid gets sucked into the motor (not
very common on Deloreans, more so on other makes). Since you say the
old fluid came out black you are probably due for a complete brake
rebuild. That black is particles of dirt, corrosion, and tiny pieces
of brake seals.
David Teitelbaum
vin 19757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "therealdmcvegas" <DMCVegas_at_dml_l...> wrote:
> Here is a bit more information to answer questions asked.
> 
> System wasn't just bled, but was power-flushed until fluid was
clear, and all 





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Message: 6
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 00:47:05 -0500
From: Paul Gress <pgress_at_dml_pb.net>
Subject: Re: wheel color

My wheels have been re-powder coated approx 5 years ago, and are still 
holding up as brand new.  My set was the first original prototype set 
Bob Grady did.  I'm very pleased with the results.  As for color 
matching, mine are the later (lighter) color.  Most people would prefer 
these, at the time mine were done, those were the only new wheels left, 
so if I needed one wheel I would have to purchase the darker on and 
strip all the epoxy off and re-coat it.  If you would really want yours 
done in the darker color I imagine you can look at sample color chips 
from the various manufactures and match it up.

Paul
vin 10193


dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com wrote:

>   Date: Mon, 15 Dec 2003 20:49:34 -0000
>   From: "Jim Reeve" <ultra_at_dml_isd.net>
>Subject: Re: wheel color
>
>An excerpt from Service Bullitin ST-02-2/82 recently posted to the 
>DMCNEWS.com website about painting the body panels, wheels, and 
>fascias...
>
>"Road Wheels
>
>Since the road wheels have a color coating that is impreg-
>nated into the surface as part of the heat treatment used
>to temper the alloy, with an epoxy clear coat applied over
>that, the adhesion of another color coat will be difficult
>to achieve even with careful preparation.  Again, it is
>suggested that you consult with your local paint distributor
>before proceeding."
>
>I'm not sure really what this means (seems a lot more exotic then 
>simple paint), but it would certainly help all those painting buffs 
>out there.  FYI, my wheels are flaking terribly.
>
>Jim Reeve
>MNDMC - Minnesota DeLorean Club
>DMC-6960
>
>
>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_d...> 
>wrote:
>  
>
>>Can you confirm this? Certainly, they all flake as if painted, and 
>>    
>>
>I 
>  
>
>>thought powder coating was a relatively new process? FWIW though, I 
>>agree with you, though it may be tricky finding a powder coating 
>>    
>>
>place 
>  
>
>>who can match early grey wheels - I ended up having mine painted, 
>>    
>>
>but to 
>  
>
>>a smooth, keyed surface.
>>
>>Martin
>>#1458
>>
>>PRC1216_at_dml_a... wrote:
>>
>>    
>>
>>>Powdercoating is the way to go.  Its more durable than paint and 
>>>      
>>>
>resists nicks and scratches more.  They were originally powdercoated 
>from the factory, not painted. 
>  
>
>
>  
>





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Message: 7
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:19:20 +0100
From: "Elvis Nocita" <elvisnocita_at_dml_gmx.de>
Subject: Re: Heritage of 7x1mm Bolts on PRV?


M7 is not common at all. Not here in Germany, not on german cars.
Maybe on some machines it is common just to make sure that
the bolts won't be changed or swapped with a worse quality, I 
don't know. But on regular cars and other things that need 
maintainance there's no M7.
I really had problems to find M7 bolts when I had to drill
one out. If John sells them and has them on stock - perfect !

Elvis




PRV is a very old design (1971). At that time 7x1mm may have been
common. Perhaps a metric old-timer can verify.

8x1mm thread on banjo bolts is also rare now.

Bill Robertson
#5939




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Message: 8
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 15:39:37 -0500
From: "Andrei Cular" <acular_at_dml_tampabay.rr.com>
Subject: Fridge Run Update

Here is the latest of potential events for the first annual Raid Rich's
Parents Fridge Run to Fort Myers FL.  Anyone that is interested in attending
please send me an email sx240_at_dml_hotmail.com

Tech session -- I have gotten permission to take over any available shop
space at work for a day and night.  Depending on what happens we might even
have a engine analyzer curtsey of Dave S.  Maybe Walt can bring his AC
equipment?  I should have everything else needed to complete any job except
for a fuel pressure gage set.  I do have few extra fuel injectors, and a rig
to clean and test them.  And a parts store with a good supply of metric
fasteners and plumbing just a couple miles down the road.

Dinner and or drinks with sunset photos at the almost world famous Tarpon
Lodge -- As long as we have less than 50 people they wont give us any
special prices, lunch usually runs about $10ea.  But they have agreed to
give us unlimited unrestricted access to the property for pictures.  And
they have a perfect back drop, specially for sunsets.  take a look at
http://www.tarponlodge.com/accommodations.htm

Beach Day -- Feb will probably still be too cold for most locals to go in
the water, but northerns will probably love it at 70 degree.

Sat Feb 21.  Edison Festival of Light car show and Parade -- If we arrange
things around this weekend and have a good showing of cars their is a very
good possibility that we will beable to participate in the show and parade.





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Message: 9
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 20:41:33 -0000
From: jettaman95_at_dml_yahoo.com
Subject: Starting problems Part 2

Dear List,
  A few days ago I wrote in saying that my car would not start. To be 
more specific. The engine turns over like it is going to start. The 
RPMs bounces up and down and I hear the engine like it may start. But 
it dosen't.
  I just got a new battery and put it in yesterday. The car started 
up with no problem. Then this morning I went out to start it and it 
was a weak start noise. So I let my car charge all day and guess 
what? It still is doing the same thing.
  By the way, while it was charging I checked each of the fuses to 
see which was draining my battery. My cigar lighter was the problem 
and I took out the fuse and the car still wont move.
  Please help!!
    Sincerly,
       Kramer
       ~10610




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Message: 10
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 15:05:00 -0600
From: James Espey <james_at_dml_usadmc.com>
Subject: DeLorean Performance Ignition Kit

Several people have already emailed me about the DeLorean Performance
Ignition Kit shown on out web site here:

http://www.delorean.com/12Days/Day6.asp

We developed this kit in conjunction with Nology (http://www.nology.com) in
California. They started the initial development on our nitrous program, and
we have used this kit on one of our test cars (the car used in the Player's
Run rally earlier this year) for nearly 12 months, and are pleased to be
able to offer it exclusively to DeLorean owners.

The kit consists of:

(6) Silverstone spark plugs - http://nology.com/silverdetail.html

(1) PowerCore ignition coil amplifier - http://nology.com/powerdetails.html

(1) Set of Hotwires spark plug wires - http://nology.com/hot.html
These plug wires have a LIFETIME warranty and have the correct end boots to
fit a DeLorean.

With all the discussion of coils and stuff a few weeks back, I'll let those
involved read the info on the Nology web site and comment.

This is a bit of background about Nology from their web site:

Nology Engineering, Inc. develops and manufactures high performance ignition
systems, engine management systems, spark plugs and other high performance
products for street cars, race cars, trucks, motorcycles, watercrafts,
alternative fuel vehicles and industrial engines. Nology's patented ignition
technology is designed to be effectively used for all racing, street and
emission orientated applications. Nology has established itself as an
innovator in the field of ignition technology.

Werner and his staff about Nology are really excited about the work they've
done with the DeLorean, and the other projects that they are working on for
us. The same goes for the guys at Edelbrock and Eibach - these are all
well-known, reputable companies with the experience and knowledge to improve
upon their respective areas of expertise with the DeLorean - and we're proud
to have their cooperation in the development of products to improve all
DeLoreans.

Feel free to contact me with any questions...

James Espey
DMC (Texas)
http://www.delorean.com




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Message: 11
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 21:48:12 -0000
From: rich_at_dml_outernet-tech.net
Subject: Re: wheel color (powder coating process)

Keep in mind that powder coating is a process of several steps
including several steps of preparation, especially when the
parts are aluminum (or aluminum alloy) and if the parts have
been exposed to chemicals, brake fluid, road salt, etc.

There are also different grades of powder coating, with some
being more durable than others, with lots of color options.

In the case of Delorean wheels, steps may include sand or bead
blasting, solvent dips and, in some cases of heavy oxidation,
a pre-resurfacing "baking" of the wheels to remove impurities
that are embedded in the exposed metal of the wheels.  I have
had wheels "pre-baked" as long as 24 hours in the powder coat
oven, prior to having the wheels resurfaced in powder.

Also, keep in mind the entire wheel should be powder coated,
to prevent contaminents from getting under the powder coat in
an unsurfaced area, which could lead to eventual flaking of
the new powder coated surface.  Clear coats are available too.

Later,
Rich W.


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, PRC1216_at_dml_a... wrote:
> Powdercoating is the way to go.  Its more durable than paint and 
resists nicks and scratches more.  They were originally powdercoated 
from the factory, not painted.  Cincinnati Powdercoating did mine 
and they look amazing.  They also clearcoated them which makes them 
a little easier to clean.  
> 
> Patrick
> #1880




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Message: 12
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 22:42:48 -0000
From: abbotts_at_dml_aardvark.net.au
Subject: Re: Squishy Brakes. Continued.

If the fluid in the master cylinder reservoir is staying at the same 
level then you can rule out failed seals, whether at the m/c or the 
caliper.
You said that the rotors are warped. If the warping is sufficient it 
can cause brake pad "knockoff", where the warped part of the rotor 
pushes the pads (and hence the pistons) away from itself and back  
towards the caliper. When you hit the brakes, the pads are a small 
distance away from the rotor so the first bit of pedal travel goes 
into taking up the slack i.e. no braking effect until the slack is 
gone and the pads are once again touching the rotors. Race drivers 
often give the brake pedal a quick push just before they need the 
brakes in earnest. Even high cornering forces can cause "knock off" 
so they dab the brakes to push the pads back against the rotors just 
prior to the high braking areas on the track.

Cheers
Steve Abbott

  --- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "therealdmcvegas" <DMCVegas_at_dml_l...> 
wrote:
> Here is a bit more information to answer questions asked.
> 
> System wasn't just bled, but was power-flushed until fluid was 
clear, and all 
> air bubbles were gone. Which took almost 4 large bottles of GTLMA 
(old fluid 
> was BLACK). Also, the condition is the same, regardless of 
temperature. It can 
> be a warm afternoon, or cold enough that I've had to scrape ice off 
the 
> windscreen (last Saturday night), and the condition is the exact 
same.
> 
> Also, the fluid level inside the reservoir appears to be fine. When 
first filled, 
> the fluid touched both fill marks on either side, and a litte of 
the top of the 
> reservoir. Now, the level is slightly below, but if I tilt the 
reservoir from side to 
> side, the fluid will touch the "Full" marks on the top.
> 
> Glazing is most likely present, but not the root cause. The problem 
aside from 
> fade is that the brakes don't "grab" until the pedal is much 
farther down. 
> However, if you pump the pedal twice in rapid succession, the 
pedal "grabs" 
> much earlier. Although, the new brake fade is still present, it 
should remain 
> consistant, and should not be affected by pumping, which it is not. 
The main 
> concern is the "grabbing".
> 
> I've not been able to fully test for pull when braking. However, no 
force has 
> been noticed, and the car still feels and appears to be stopping in 
a straight 
> line. However, the front rotors are warped, so I'll need to find a 
set of calipers 
> to measure their thickness. Hopefully I'll have enough material 
left to turn 'em 
> so they'll be corrected, but that's another subject.
> 
> At this point, I'm more than convinced that the problem is 
hydraulic. But 
> wheather the issue is: 1. Blown seal(s) in new M/C, 2. Blown inner 
seal on 
> caliper(s), or 3. swelling brake hoses, I don't know. Or perhaps a 
combination 
> of one or more (these are the only things that I can think of that 
would cause 
> such a sudden pressure loss, and fit with my symptoms). Plus, gut 
instinct tells 
> me that I can't just replace the brake hoses, and leave the old 
calipers in 
> place. While it may be an unfounded fear, I'm not comfortable with 
forcing 
> more pressure on who-knows-how-old caliper seals with new SS 
Braided 
> hoses installed. And rather than replace a couple of seals, I'd 
also rather just 
> swap out for fresh rebuilt units (I don't trust old equipment).
> 
> Thanks again to everyone!
> 
> -Robert
> vin 6585 "X"




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Message: 13
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 23:22:23 -0000
From: brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net
Subject: Re: "French" PRV

Factory was in France, but Swedes have their fingerprints on design too.

To be honest, Volvo's final rework of original design (B280) is very
nice engine, EFI not withstanding.

I was very leery about PRV before actually getting my hands on one
(original posts to DML regarded Vortec conversion). Now, am rather
fond of the little powerplant. Has its weaknesses: "Internal" water
distribution pipe is assinine. Ignition distributor would have been
better relocated by cylinder #3 (as it is on B280). Clearance is tight
among injectors and spark plugs. But in all PRV is surprisingly smooth
running (given odd fire sequence) with good bottom end torque and
projected long life span -- Bertone I saw in Hagarstown junkyard had
180,000 miles on odometer.

JZD could have chosen worse.

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, jtrealty_at_dml_w... wrote:
> You mention "heritage". Just remember this IS a FRENCH engine. Need I
> have to say more? BTW the banjo bolts would be Bosch, they did the
> fuel system. The hardware is not all that hard to get, you just can't
> get it in the local hardware store.
> David Teitelbaum
> vin 10757
> 
> 
> 





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Message: 14
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 18:29:58 -0600
From: "K. Creason" <dmc4687_at_dml_mindspring.com>
Subject: RE: Re: TOBY-TAB update

>If you're driving
>around with a wandering suspension or hearing loud clunks emanating from
>the rear suspension you should be checking things out. If you continue
>driving until something fails you can't blame it on the design.

I disagree with that statement. My !#$_at_dml_#% car has so much clunking from the
half-axles sliding back and forth that I am constantly checking the TABs,
but have to fight the tendency to forget that that noise is there.

My car is also lowered-- I think by the cut and swap method. But the
difference is that is we done by Crest Chevrolet before the first owner took
possession, so no-one really knows how it was lowered. I still wonder if the
cut-n-swap method lowering creates extra axle thunking or something. I've
done the body bolts several times, secured the tool kits and stuff, and
replaced rear-end bearings...
I removed my original TABs last year and they were slightly stretched,
slightly bent. The Toby-TABs are in.

Q for Toby: it was said to be bad to re-torque the original TABs (could
cause more fatigue or something) is that true for the Toby TABs? If so-- is
there no maintenance method of checking and securing the TABs besides a
visual inspection (which can't see squat) or replacing them (not an option
since TTABs are not available)?

Thanks-
Kevin




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Message: 15
Date: Tue, 16 Dec 2003 22:07:42 EST
From: kKoncelik_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: wheel color (powder coating process)

If you want powder coating all of the vendors do it and if you want other 
options there is an add in DeLorean Car Show Magazine for a powdercoater I use 
regularly for car parts and other things

Ken


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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