From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 1821
Date: Sunday, January 04, 2004 8:43 PM

There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. RE: 15W40 oil brand
From: "Cecil Longwisch" <dmc1982_at_dml_msn.com>

2. Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply
From: "TalksToGod" <5n-_at_dml_gmx.net>

3. Re: Performance Chips
From: mike.griese_at_dml_worldnet.att.net

4. RE: Re: carbon buildup
From: "John Hervey" <john_at_dml_specialtauto.com>

5. Re: Another TV Delorean sighting: I love the 80's strikes back
From: Cory Cooley <mrdelorean88_at_dml_yahoo.com>

6. Re: 8 Quarts of Oil / 20 Plus Weight Oil
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

7. Re: carbon buildup
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

8. Re: Rob Grady Reply
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

9. RE: 15W40 oil brand
From: "Darkstar" <darkstarmedia_at_dml_comcast.net>

10. Re: Performance Chips
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

11. Re: Performance Chips
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>

12. Re: 15W40 oil brand -- LONG POST
From: kayoong_at_dml_aol.com

13. Repairs
From: "cruznmd" <racuti1_at_dml_delorean.com>

14. Re: Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply
From: "Michael Paine" <mpaine_at_dml_tycomsystems.com>

15. Re: Performance Chips
From: Mark Noeltner <mark_at_dml_buffalochips.org>

16. RE: IT'S FINALLY RUNS
From: "D F" <funkstuf_at_dml_hotmail.com>

17. Re: Performance Chips
From: "pdmytrewycz" <pauld_at_dml_pauld.net>

18. Re: Repairs- snapped key removal
From: "Stephen Card" <stephen_at_dml_procomroofing.com>

19. RE: Repairs
From: "K. Creason" <dmc4687_at_dml_mindspring.com>

20. Re: Performance Chips
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>

21. Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply
From: "ksgrimsr" <knut.s.grimsrud_at_dml_intel.com>

22. Re: Repairs
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

23. Re: Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply
From: "supermattthehero" <supermatty_at_dml_psu.edu>

24. Re: Digest Number 1820 Carbon buildup
From: rbrogren_at_dml_aol.com

25. Re: Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com





Message: 1
Date: Sat, 03 Jan 2004 23:12:30 -0500
From: "Cecil Longwisch" <dmc1982_at_dml_msn.com>
Subject: RE: 15W40 oil brand

I just pulled the pan off my engine after using only Mobil 1 in it for the 
last 9 years. ( no problems but tapping the block for turbo installation) 
The pan was clean with absolutely no sludge or grit. The car only has 26k 
but it is over 20 years old too. I have pulled apart quite a few engines and 
this is by far the cleanest pan I have seen.

It has made a believer out of me. I am sure there are many excellent oils 
but for the occasional use many of our cars get I like the synthetics.

Cecil Longwisch
#10663



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Message: 2
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 04:17:48 -0000
From: "TalksToGod" <5n-_at_dml_gmx.net>
Subject: Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply

It is not that I (talkstogod) am "ignoring" posts from
everyone-especially George Caprita's (other's past experiences in
purchasing parts and their feedback on the quality are always welcome
and appreciated), and I am really not posting on
the list to find out who makes the best of the best rack and pinions
and make everyone argue about it-I am simply trying to gather as many
responses as I can to figure out my next steps and to see IF THERE WAS
A CROSS-REFERENCE to the DeLorean bearing. I previously found it hard
to believe that these bearings were hard to find because of the large
volume of normal people(-**not vender-who I suspected to have a stock
of these parts!!**-)regular-every day people like myself and many on
this list-trying to sell me racks and take mine as a core to fix and
resell. This led me to believe these people were finding parts to
these racks & pinions and I wanted to get in on where-in order to fix
my own without having to spend so much in these hard time of money
troubles. It seems as though now, the more I dig, the more I find
these bearings are hard to remake or find a duplicate of. Also, in
response to Rob Grady, if I would have clicked on PJ Grady's rack &
pinion and read all the information about how the parts were all
remade etc, this would have prompted me to spend my money on that
particular one (Now that I cannot find my bearing, I will spend my
money (when I save up that amount) there knowing the craftsmanship). I
have not read this information anywhere on the site and didn't even
know about this until now. No one knows what kind of time and money
you put into your parts if you don't provide it to them clearly-I
recommend you post the information just like you did here on how much
money and time you spent on these rack & pinions on your website so
everyone will see this when they are interested in your racks, and not
just that they are getting some rebuilt unit. If you don't tell people
what kind of quality they are getting-if they are just seeing it is a
"Rebuild Steering Rack & Pinion" -they will go from vender to vender
seeking the lowest price. I hope you all understand the intentions of
my original post seeking a X-ref, sorry for any confusion.




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Message: 3
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 04:55:45 +0000
From: mike.griese_at_dml_worldnet.att.net
Subject: Re: Performance Chips

It depends on the car.  They work by remapping the fuel 
delivery tables.  This usually prevents the car from meeting
emissions.

--
Mike

> Hey all,
> 
> I know this isn't directly related to a DeLorean, but I keep seeing 
> performance chips on sale for cars. Do they really work, or add any 
> performance that is noticeable?
> Thanks
> 
> Dave L.
> Overseas in Operation Iraqi Freedom



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Message: 4
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 21:06:10 -0800
From: "John Hervey" <john_at_dml_specialtauto.com>
Subject: RE: Re: carbon buildup

David, If I'm not mistaken resilone is a good top end cleaner and it's also
good for cleaning out the oil paths. Add to the gas in small amounts as it
will cause the engine to smoke as it burns. Top end cleaner was a blend of
oils for cleaning off the intake valves as the fuel was going thru them.
Then what wasn't burned would clean the exhaust valves. Grinding action.
John
www.specialtauto.com




-----Original Message-----
From: David Teitelbaum [mailto:jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net]
Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2004 8:54 AM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: [DML] Re: carbon buildup


> It is called "Engine Top End Cleaner". I don't remember who makes it.
> It seems since the introduction of catalytic converters it is hard to
> find this anymore. I am guessing but it probably wasn't any good for
> the converters so it is no longer available. You might find some old
> stock if you look hard enough. If you have always used modern gasoline
> then it isn't much of a concern anymore. On all the motors I have
> taken apart they don't carbon up like they used to with the older gas.
> Unless the rings are shot and you are burning large quantities of oil
> you shouldn't need to do it. I DO suggest you have the fuel injectors
> cleaned. A dirty injector with a bad spray pattern will affect
> performance. You can't do it with a can of stuff in the fuel tank. The
> injectors MUST come off and be done in a tester. You can also pull the
> spark plugs. They can tell you a lot about how the motor is inside and
> how it is running. If they are all caked up with carbon then you know
> you have problems. Generally they come out nice and tan except for
> wear on the electodes. Always cheaper to replace but they too can be
> cleaned and regapped if not too worn or cracked.
> David Teitelbaum
> vin 10757



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Message: 5
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 21:17:06 -0800 (PST)
From: Cory Cooley <mrdelorean88_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Another TV Delorean sighting: I love the 80's strikes back

Scott,
Thats a negative on "strikes back" they mention the DeLorean in the orginal "I love the 80's, 1981"
Cory


> Scott McMullan <mcmullan_at_dml_netaxs.com> wrote:
> 
> This morning, I caught an episode of "I love the 80's strikes back" on some
> channel I never watch (VH1?) thanks to my neice being in town... the episode
> focused on 1981, and I caught about half a second of a Delorean rear end in
> the opening sequence. Eventually they got around to talking briefly about
> DeLoreans; voiced over some nice shots of a lot of cars parked someplace I
> didn't recognize and some on the road. They got their technical facts
> straight (they have stainless steel body panels and volvo engines), followed
> by stuff about JZD himself (sounded like the beginning of his legal troubles
> in the US and the common condeming hearsay about him and drugs). I'm not
> really "up" on the timeline or specifics of what happened to him, but it
> sounded like they were straying from their 1981 theme a bit there.
> 
> Anyway, I like it when my favorite car gets airtime in almost any context
> that doesn't include gratuitously destroying a car :-)



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Message: 6
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 05:30:11 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: 8 Quarts of Oil / 20 Plus Weight Oil

I wouldn't recommend going above the 7 quart fill specification. Too
much oil in the crankcase will get whipped into foam, which impedes
splash lubrication of the pistons and cylinders. I've also heard of
foam blocking crankcase journal passages.

I fully agree that light weight oils are to be avoided in all but the
coldest climates. 5W and 10W multi-viscosities are exactly that --
regular 5 and 10 weight oil with miracle additives that are supposed
to behave like heavier oil after the engine warms up. My experience
has been that the additives separate into their own gluey clumps,
leaving you with true two part oil -- watery and lumpy.

I've burned straight 30 weight oil in all my cars for years with no
problems (mild climate).

Recommended API rating used to be SF or so. All single viscosities at
least seem today to be at least SJ. I don't think you can buy brand
name oil without exceeding the manufacturer's wildest imagined
detergent package.

Of course even the best oil ever invented isn't worth 2 cents if left
in an engine too long...

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Video Bob" <videobob_at_dml_h...> wrote:
> I don't know why this keeps coming up since it is defined in the
manual....
> unless you live far north, near Alaska, deep Canada or where the
temp is 
> usually below zero you should just use 20/50 as it suggests in the
manual.
> Here in Texas it stays pretty warm except for early mornings where I
have 
> seen it get below
> zero this year, but I am usually not tooling around in my car at 4AM
when it 
> is 27 degrees out.
> 
> If you review your owners manual, or a workshop book you will see
that the 
> grades are
> listed by temperature.
> 10/30, 15/40 and 20/40 are listed for temps below 14F.
> Anything above that would be 20/50.
> 
> Save yourself some trouble and pick a good name brand of oil, Penzz,
Mobil, 
> etc.. and buy
> 8 quarts, or 2 gallons of that.
> 
> Make sure to get some new copper crush washers:
> ( 16mm or 5/8" copper) (Oil-Tite: 65273) ....for the drain plug or
it might 
> leak.
> You can get them free with oil filters when you buy them from John 
> (specialtauto.com).
> 
> So unless you are skidding the tundra today, I would use 20/50.
> - Videobob
> VIN# 5278

[long quote trimmed by moderator]



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Message: 7
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 05:52:06 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: carbon buildup

I think you're talking about "soot". Carbon welds itself to pistons
and valves. Simply running a vaporous product through the cylinders
won't remove it. I've heard of people dropping cold water through the
spark plug holes (hot engine) to crack and break it up, but that
sounds way too dangerous to me -- would be just my luck to damage the
pistons themselves.

Think of it this way: diamonds are made of carbon, heated and
compressed. That's what you're up against.

Most of the crap you see burning from top engine cleaners is gum,
varnish, and other light weight deposits (soot). Certainly worth
removing, but won't help if your engine has suffered from thousands of
miles of dirty combustion. BTW: I ocassionally do something similar
with my carbureted vehicles, which unfortunately don't get enough
highway miles, by simply pouring gas tank additives straight down the
venturi. I call it "making smoke" (for obvious reasons). But the
engine DOES run better afterwards. Removes any crap before it has a
chance to become permanent. Look at your spark plugs (only way to tell
what's going on inside the cylinders) -- they'll indicate whether
cleaning is necessary.

Probably unnecessary on a true "daily driver" (in proper tune).

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Farrar Hudkins" <fhudkins_at_dml_u...> wrote:
>
> Does anybody know the name of the stuff to decarbonize one's engine? I
> recall somebody saying it comes in a can, and the engine runs off of
the can
> for a minute or two (belching out great plumes of stuff). I don't ask
> because I want to burn a different fuel ... My engine seems to run
well on
> 89 octane fuel -- fine with me but it'd be nice to burn out the
junk. With
> close to 90,000 miles I suspect it should be about time for this
especially
> since I don't know what happened before I bought the thing.
> 
> Regards and Happy 2004,
> Farrar Hudkins
> New Orleans, LA




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Message: 8
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 06:16:17 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: Rob Grady Reply

Perhaps this is just my own perception, since I am a fairly new owner
myself, but it seems as though a lot of DeLoreans have been changing
hands in the past year or two. If so:
1) In the time preceding these cars may have been sitting idle,
consuming few parts
2) The new owners -- if they intend to make/keep their cars roadable
-- will be buying a lot of parts in the future

Isn't this what Toby Peterson encountered with his TAB's? (Recent
demand has skyrocketed, depleting what used to be an inventoried item
 BEFORE production even begins). There also is enough new demand to
spawn companies like John Hervey's and Martin Gutkowski's.

And don't forget that the economy still remains less healthy than
Uncle George wants us to believe (flame alert). I know my own
purchasing priorities have been downgraded to match a stagnant paycheck.

Your reputation as a premier repair center and parts source is intact.
Owners will certainly turn to you for indispensible items now. If/when
the economy improves, they will come to you for less critical items.
Should that demand be pent up enough you may find yourself with the
opposite problem -- too much business.

Note to any new owners: every item I have purchased from Grady has
been top quality, received timely.

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_d...> wrote:
> Rob has some difficulty getting this to the list and asked me to post 
> the reply... Dave S
> 
> -----------------------
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "PJ Grady Info" <info_at_dml_p...>
> To: "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_d...>
> Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2004 6:58 PM
> Subject: RE: Talks to God
> 
> 
> I understand your dilemma. To the best of my knowledge the bearing is 
> what is known as a "special". This is commonly done in the auto 
> business by factories to keep people from putting generic components 
> in their assemblies. There are many reasons for this.
> 1)The first obviously is greed. They want your future business on the 
> components they manufacture.
> 2) Conversely this also helps the company to stay in business which 
> is usually a good thing.
> 3) This is especially common with steering and suspension components 
> because the company has your safety and their reputation as a top 
> priority.
> 4) The quality of bearings and such varies greatly and this helps the 
> company to control the safe repair and use of the product.
> 5) Equally important this helps control who rebuilds the components 
> as the controlled distribution of repair parts also prequalifies who 
> will rebuild these safety critical items.
> Years ago I disassembled a new steering rack and had all of the 
> bearings, bushings, preloader springs and shims manufactured from 
> scratch. By far the most expensive parts were the bearings so I had 
> to make 200 bearing assemblies for it to be cost effective. The high 
> grade of steel we used had to be machined, heat treated to c60 
> (that's hard!) and then ground to final dimensions. Heat treating to 
> this hardness requires precalculation of the shrinkage rate or your 
> new parts are now scrap! I spent many thousands of dollars to have 
> all these parts manufactured. If you have a worn bearing then I 
> assure you your rack will need other parts such as boots, a pinion 
> seal and internal bushings. One of the reasons (besides the money I
> invested) I haven't sold these parts individually is to protect 
> people from poor and incomplete repairs on the most important safety 
> item in their car.
> I have sold racks to people who had bought them from at least two of 
> the other major vendors because these assemblies were of poor 
> quality. If you can't get a quality part from these guys what chance 
> do you or even your mechanic have of doing a quality repair. PJ 
> Grady's is the only vendor who rebuilds their racks in house using 
> all new bearings, seals, bushings, preload shims and springs. Someone 
> correct me if I'm wrong. Because our racks are forty five dollars 
> higher than Houston's we have watched our sales of this part plummet 
> in the last year or so. We went through our first 100
> racks (200 Bearings) in about 3 years which I felt was sustainable on 
> an investment verses return basis. If sales don't pick up I will 
> either 
> A) Discontinue manufacturing these parts as I use up existing stock 
> or 
> B) Offer them as a rebuild kit complete with rebuild instructions. 
> The problem with
> B) goes back to reason number 5. We lose all control of who rebuilds 
> the rack and also the quality of the reusable core parts i.e. the 
> rack body, pinion and rack bar. We reject about half the cores we 
> receive because of pitting of the gears, housing damage etc. Our 
> racks are rebuilt by my shop foreman who has many years of 
> experience. You can put your life in his hands I guarantee it! Is 
> that worth the extra forty five dollars?  My ad for this part says it 
> all "when your car won't steer, just remember, the good racks are 
> here. Since many of you don't apparently think so I have decided to
> decrease the price to match Houston's. If that doesn't help I just 
> won't bother making them any more. I know the poor economy plays a 
> part in this.
> I've seen my sales on stainless radiator screens and life time 
> guarantee tail light circuit boards drop as well (which no one else 
> makes). Would anybody care if I stopped producing these parts? Please 
> give me some feedback on this.I need to make some decisions.
> 
> Why did "Talks to God" ignore George Caprita's post about his 
> experience with a rebuilt rack. I guess he only talks to God. 
> Unfortunately George didn't tell him who he purchased his rebuilt 
> rack from nor all the problems
> he found inside it. Isn't anybody brave on this list? That's ok I 
> won't tell either. I have more to lose than an owner does after all I 
> have a DeLorean business. Several other people on this list have had 
> similar problems with other vendors (are you listening Christian 
> etc? - and what about your experiences Knut?) but no one speaks 
> up...or it doesn't get past the moderators. I'll have more to say on 
> this and other subjects at a later date.
> 
> Happy New Year
> 
> Rob Grady
> ______________________________
> 
> www.info(AT)pjgrady.com

[very long quote trimmed by moderator]



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Message: 9
Date: Sat, 3 Jan 2004 22:21:12 -0800
From: "Darkstar" <darkstarmedia_at_dml_comcast.net>
Subject: RE: 15W40 oil brand

probably Rotello but 15w40 is designed for diesels.

Darkstar

-----Original Message-----
From: Scott McMullan [mailto:mcmullan_at_dml_netaxs.com]
Sent: January 3, 2004 7:52 AM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: [DML] 15W40 oil brand



> I was looking through a local Pep Boys store the other day, and had a
> difficult time locating 15W40 oil.  As it turns out, they only seem to carry
> one brand of that weight, and only in gallons.  I've never heard of this oil
> brand (began with an R, forget the full name).  The package had a yellow
> shell on it, so I wonder if maybe the oil is actually produced by Shell Oil,
> and distributed under a strange name?
> 
> While I know there are many conflicting ideas about what kind of oil to use
> in the PRV, I was wondering if anyone had a strong opinion one way or
> another about using an oddball oil brand, as opposed to the better known
> ones.
> 
> I had no trouble finding the GTLMA fluid for my clutch, which was nice to
> see.



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Message: 10
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 07:03:41 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: Performance Chips

The PRV's in our DeLoreans come from the odd state of automobile
technology in the late 1970's/early 1980's -- what are basically
1960's designs, tweaked with "bolt-on" modifications to satisfy
changing market and regulatory conditions rather than fundamentally
re-engineering the product. Those changes didn't occur until the late
1980's/early 1990's -- lead by advances in microprocessing.
Performance chips of course belong to the later breed.

Simply compare your PRV to contemporary engines to see the difference
(note that some items on your PRV are the same technology used in the
1950's!):
- Mechanically rotating ignition distributor vs solid state coil pack
- Vacuum and centrifugal spark advance (laws of physics) vs
electrically controlled spark advance
- Manually set ignition time (rotating body of the distributor itself)
vs computer calculated ignition time
- All cylinders are live all the time vs ability to shut down cylinders
- Air entering the engine directly controls fuel metering vs being
merely being a sensed variable in computerized metering calculation
- Injectors open "mechanically" (pressure of fuel) vs responding to an
electrical signal

I've never owned a computer controlled vehicle so I can't personally
attest to performance chips. Some people I've spoken to swear by them.

But I can tell you this: what looks like a major change in performance
on paper sometimes translates into only a minor change in actual
performance. For example, I have 1 Lincoln re-powered with a factory
original 1969 engine (except for breakerless ignition upgrade), and 4
Lincolns with factory original 1977-1978 engines. The 1969 engine has
dramatically higher HP numbers (365 vs 200ish), though some of that
difference is related to the change from gross to net HP calculation.
But it's actual performance on the road is at best 10% above the
"dumbed-down" models. It *IS* faster. But certainly not so much so to
make me replace engines in the other cars.

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "grandprix9598" <grandprix9598_at_dml_y...>
wrote:
> Hey all,
> 
> I know this isn't directly related to a DeLorean, but I keep seeing 
> performance chips on sale for cars. Do they really work, or add any 
> performance that is noticeable?
> Thanks
> 
> Dave L.
> Overseas in Operation Iraqi Freedom




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Message: 11
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 11:56:22 +0000
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>
Subject: Re: Performance Chips

Have a read

http://www.pumaracing.co.uk/chip.htm

(I'd paste it here but he's stated copyright)

Martin

grandprix9598 wrote:

>Hey all,
>
>I know this isn't directly related to a DeLorean, but I keep seeing 
>performance chips on sale for cars. Do they really work, or add any 
>performance that is noticeable?
>Thanks
>
>Dave L.
>Overseas in Operation Iraqi Freedom
>  
>





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Message: 12
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2004 07:18:59 EST
From: kayoong_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: 15W40 oil brand -- LONG POST

Andy and all:

My experiences with the different oils in my DeLorean #5508.

I purchased my #5508 in April 1996 with 12,000 miles on the odometer and I 
have logged over 106,000 miles since then.   

When I first brought the #5508 it was sitting for a good part of its life 
although it was driven periodically around the block to "move" the parts.   

As soon as I owned #5508, I immediately changed the oil and the oil filter 
using Castrol Oil "Blend" 10W-30, which is half petroleum and synthetic oil 
mixture.  At the same time, I also had changed the fuel pump, the rubber housing, 
fuel hoses on top of the tank, the fuel filter and the fuel sender unit (the 
TankZilla).   Along with the a new battery, wipers, FanZilla, Lockzilla, all 
new gas struts for the doors, engine and truck lids, new oxygen sensor and a 
complete tune which included cap, rotor, wires and spark plugs.   Changed the 
coolant and bled the system to make sure there was no air trapped.   Bled to 
flush the brake fluid and to make sure there was no air.   Check the tires for the 
correct air pressure and then washed #5508.    Last, we took some pictures.   
I then said "good bye" to my good friend where the seller had left #5508 in 
storage in his garage, the suburb of Detroit.   I jumped in #5508 and drove 
#5508 all the way home -- All the way from Detroit to New York City -- In part 
sunshine, then it start to rain and snow during the rest of the trip.   I got 
#5508 home in NYC with just a minor electrical problem; it was the interior 
light switch not touching the door, so the interior light was flickering, so I did 
a manual override to shut the lights.   I got home in less then eight hours 
for 600 plus miles of driving.

Two days later, I took #5508 to Rob at PJ Grady for a complete check up and 
whatever #5508 needed, it got it.    I had changed or updated many parts, even 
though many of the parts were still working, for I wanted a problem free 
vehicle.

Since then, I have changed my engine oil religiously (when I can between) 
2,500 to 3,000.   Because, I drive my car every day to work as well as on extreme 
long trips, I make sure everything is up to par and working correctly and the 
engine and tranny oil getting its periodically changes, is a must.   The 
different brands of oils that I have used have been all synthetic oils, for I 
wanted to test how the different oils behave in the PVR.    I have used all the 
different oils listed more then once, in the different seasons and the driving 
conditions that #5508 was subjected to.   

They are the Castrol Syntec 5W-50; Redline 10W-40; Quaker State 5W-50 and 
10W-30; Mobil1 10W-30 and 15W-50.   
    
Of all the oils, I do like is the Quaker 10W-30, but I have to change it 
earlier, between 2,000 and 2,500 miles, for *I* feel the engine is laboring beyond 
those mileages -- I believe the oil is "braking" down.   I find that the 
Castrol Syntec 5W-50 it is a good oil, but it does not give me the best *feeling* 
when the engine is driven "hard," especially on long trips when the engine is 
hot, for it feels like the Quaker 10W-30.    At the present, I am running on 
Mobil1 15W-50 which has given me decent service for the last five oils changes.

FWIW ... I used six quarts of the synthetic oil and one quart of Marvel 
Mystery Oil .... Please don't start to flame me on my practices of using Marvel 
Mystery Oil.   My engine is running fine with no oil being lost or burnt, the oil 
level still sits between the two marks, pretty much at the same place at each 
oil and filter change since my ownership.   My tail pipe is *still* a clean 
light gray with no black soot and I still pass New York State's Emission Test, 
including the mandatory dynamo test.    The Marvel Mystery Oil is a practice, 
that I have being doing with all my cars especially with my 1957 S-1 Bentley 
for the last 32 years -- It is also a practice that is performed by the many 
Rolls Royce and Bentley mechanics of yester years, whom I have learnt it from.   
My S-1 Bentley's motor is using standard dino-petro motor oil, for that is 
recommended and it is best for the motor's internal components and the gaskets; 
non recommended oils "wickers" the different gaskets in the engine which can 
cause "leaks."   The Bentley's 6 cylinder 4.5 liter motor takes eleven quarts 
of oil!   

The DeLorean's PVR is a fairly modern engine and synthetic oils where around 
during its inception, so there should be no adversities with the internal 
components or the gaskets.   So far with so good and no valve tappet noises 
whether hot or cold with good normal operating oil pressure.    BTW.... I have three 
plus quarts of RedLine MTL in standard tranny too.   MTL is a synthetic oil.  
 MTL will get rid of the dino-petro smell during the hot weather conditions, 
while it shift nicely and smoothly in the extreme cold weather.   A bit 
expensive..... BUT WORTH IT!

As a habit when I change the engine and tranny oils, I do a visual inspection 
in the old oil for the different color metal flakes or particles that is 
usually associate for wear and tear.   I check my oil drain plugs too for my plugs 
have magnet to pick up the ferrous particles.    I also "open" the oil filter 
to see what's is in it and there have been no signs of premature wear of 
metal flakes or particles in the engine oil filter.   Again, so far so good.....

So.... I hope that helps.

Kayo Ong
#5508
Lic   9D   NY

==========================================================================

 



In a message dated 1/3/04 9:53:07 PM, Soma576_at_dml_aol.com writes:


> 
> Why can't any information here agree?  Personally, i have been using mobil
> 10w40, but i think i might go to mobil 1 15W40 next season.  At least the 
> 15W40
> is listed for summertime temperatures in the owner's manual AND the Workshop
> manual.  I fear that 20W50 may be a little too thick for those of us in the
> upper part of the US, even if we don't drive our cars in the winter time.  
> there
> are many days even in the summer when the temps go below 64F at night.  Not
> only that, but a thicker oil will make it harder to get good gas mileage or
> maximum performance on a low compression non-race engine such as our PRV's 
> (though
> I have to admit that the PRV is a 'loose' engine and could benefit from a
> thicker oil/longer drain intervals). 
> 
> any other thoughts?  has anyone switched grades each season or oil change to
> note performance or starting differences?
> 
> Andy
> 
> 



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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________________________________________________________________________


Message: 13
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 14:45:49 -0000
From: "cruznmd" <racuti1_at_dml_delorean.com>
Subject: Repairs

This post will cover a varitey of little things so please bear with 
me:

1. As I stated before, I bought my car with one half of the ignition 
key broken off in the switch. I use the half-key to start the car. I 
hate this. -IS- it possible for a locksmith to dig that piece out of 
there? I don't want to replace the switch and have a 2 key system or 
rekey the whole dang car because of a 1/2 inch long piece of potmetal.

2. Mike Cohee and I worked on my fuel system yesterday. Lesson 
learned: Don't, just don't try to install plug wires on the 
distributor cap by slightly lifting the air/fuel mixture unit. I've 
been driving around with 2 wires disconnected. Only by completely 
removing mine was I able to properly route and attach everything. 
Also, I swapped my injectors for his old, but serviceble ones. I 
think I have about as much power as I should. They probably clogged 
because I waited too long to replace the filter.  Finally. I need to 
buy that dang WOT microswitch. No good deed goes unpunished though. I 
snapped a banjo bolt off and Mike cannabalized one from his engine so 
I could get home. Thanks Mike.

3. Today, I shone a light under the driver's seat. Lo and behold, 
what do I find? The plastic dust cap for the speedometer angle drive. 
It's in perfect condition. The square hole hasn't been rounded out. 
My lower cable was rusted solid and wouldn't spin so I have to 
replace that. How does the angle drive come out so I can check and 
lube it? I don't know if it's ruined too or what. I want to order all 
my parts at once.

Thanks,

Rich
#5335




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Message: 14
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 10:16:48 -0500 EST
From: "Michael Paine" <mpaine_at_dml_tycomsystems.com>
Subject: Re: Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply

I, for one, am EXTREAMLY Happy with the products Rob manufactures and I 
am in need of some of them, - as I get the fuinds.

I hope you do plan on continuing your processes Rob and wish you GREAT 
business in '04!

regards,

Michael
vin 6067

> Rob has some difficulty getting this to the list and asked me to post 
> the reply... Dave S
> 
> -----------------------
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "PJ Grady Info" <info_at_dml_pjgrady.com>
> To: "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_dmcnews.com>
> Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2004 6:58 PM
> Subject: RE: Talks to God
> 
> 
> I understand your dilemma. To the best of my knowledge the bearing is 
> what is known as a "special". This is commonly done in the auto 
> business by factories to keep people from putting generic components 
> in their assemblies. There are many reasons for this.
SNIP> 
> Happy New Year
> 
> Rob Grady
> ______________________________
> 



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Message: 15
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 08:45:42 -0700
From: Mark Noeltner <mark_at_dml_buffalochips.org>
Subject: Re: Performance Chips

[Moderator Note: Unless someone comes up with a DeLorean-related angle to the subject, I'm killing this thread.  - Mike Substelny DML moderator of the week]

At 07:12 PM 1/3/2004, grandprix9598 wrote:
>I know this isn't directly related to a DeLorean, but I keep seeing
>performance chips on sale for cars. Do they really work, or add any
>performance that is noticeable?
>Thanks
>
>Dave L.
>Overseas in Operation Iraqi Freedom

You're right, it's not a DeLorean question at all. For other more modern 
cars, the very short answer is yes, but usually no.

The slightly longer answer is yes, if it's one of the "chips" or piggy-back 
computers sold by one of the reputable firms that make these. No if it's 
some cheap thing on eBay that promises lots of horsepower for less than 
$50. Here is an example of one of the bad ones for a Mazda Miata:
http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=33557&item=2452037556
This is actually just a resistor, not a chip, and all it does is change the 
voltage of the Mass Air Flow sensor to fool the computer. It's been dyno 
tested by some of the guys at the Miata forum and it actually decreases HP 
in some situations. Lousy modification IMHO.

The more complete answer is that even the ones from the reputable 
companies, which sell for hundreds of dollars will really only do any good 
in conjunction with other modifications. There are exceptions to this, and 
some cars will benefit by 10% or so extra horsepower with just the chip, 
but these are the exceptions, not the rule.

The good chips and piggy-back computers (which one you need varies by car 
make and model) are reprogrammed to modify the fuel and timing maps to work 
better with modifications you have done to your motor. And I don't mean 
little ones like a cat-back exhaust or a cold air intake. Your stock 
computer has enough leeway to compensate for those. I'm talking cams, or 
maybe head work that modifies the compression ratio, or stuff like forced 
induction (supercharging or turbocharging) where there has been enough 
change in the motor that the stock programming just won't compensate. The 
good companies will program a custom chip for you to match your 
modifications rather than just selling you an off the shelf generic chip.

The DeLorean doesn't have a complete computer management system like the 
newer cars, so the only way to get all of these benefits on it are to 
convert the entire fuel and ignition management system over to something 
like a TEC III system.

Hope that answers your question.

Mark N
VIN 6820 




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________________________________________________________________________


Message: 16
Date: Thu, 01 Jan 2004 03:50:22 +0000
From: "D F" <funkstuf_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: RE: IT'S FINALLY RUNS

It is true that if you shake out the insides of the cat, the car will run 
fine.  In addition, the converter will no longer heat up red hot.
Realize that in some places you must pass an emissions test to re-license 
the vehicle.
You can purchase a catalytic converter if necessary from several places 
including delorean motor co in houston at www.delorean.com.  If you are 
running the car while partially plugged I suggest you be very careful about 
the heat it generates.

Dale Funk
#4984


>From: John Podlewski <john_podlewski_at_dml_yahoo.com>
>Reply-To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
>To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
>Subject: [DML] IT'S FINALLY RUNS
>Date: Tue, 30 Dec 2003 19:18:22 -0800 (PST)
>
>
>After nearly six months and two very poorly run, repair shops, my delorean 
>finally RUNS.  Thanks to all the fellow delorean owners who helped out with 
>their advice, understanding, time, and tools thanks again John!  Problems 
>being old injectors, fuel hoses connected incorrectly at the fuel pump, (to 
>think I paid out lots of $$$ for that and they had three months to figure 
>it out), a new C.P.R thanks to Special T.  It Idled great after many hours 
>of labor but stalled upon acceleration until today!  Found out it was the 
>CAT blocked or clogged, whatever, anyone know where to get a bypass"test 
>pipe" in the U.S, other than going to the muffler shop?  I'm not looking 
>forward to spending $$$ on a new CAT if I don't have to. Don't know if they 
>will do the work yet I will find out next year, THANKS AGAIN!



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Message: 17
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 17:31:16 -0000
From: "pdmytrewycz" <pauld_at_dml_pauld.net>
Subject: Re: Performance Chips

I recently had an upgraded chip put in my '98 VW Jetta. They're best
if used in conjunction with other performance mods. For example, I got
an Autotech Tuning chip, a Techtonics cat-back exhaust, and a K&N
performance air filter. The whole upgrade boosted my car's (2.0 liter
engine) horsepower from 115 to about 135 with comparable increase in
torque. It drives like a new car, even though there are over 100k
miles on the odometer. The whole thing cost about $600, chip was about
$100. They have to get the right chip for your engine. It's tuned to
handle engine management tasks better than the stock computer chip.
I haven't heard anything about chips for Deloreans though.

Word, Paul D.




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Message: 18
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:06:29 -0000
From: "Stephen Card" <stephen_at_dml_procomroofing.com>
Subject: Re: Repairs- snapped key removal

Yes, a locksmith should be able to remove the broken piece of the 
key.  There are special tools for extracting the broken end. You can 
try picking up a very small jig saw blade or dremmel bit (use both 
as hand tools) at the hardware store. Try to get next to the key 
and "catch" the edge to pull it out.
You may try lubricating the key cylinder to allow for easier 
extraction.
Hope this helps,
Stephen
Vin 3601
> 1. As I stated before, I bought my car with one half of the 
ignition key broken off in the switch. I use the half-key to start 
the car. I hate this. -IS- it possible for a locksmith to dig that 
piece out of there? 





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________________________________________________________________________


Message: 19
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2004 12:17:49 -0600
From: "K. Creason" <dmc4687_at_dml_mindspring.com>
Subject: RE: Repairs

ignition sw:
yes... I've broken off my own key in the ignition. I was not able to remove
the piece without disassembly on this car.
There are many little parts to watch out for.
Here are the basic steps-- it's been a while so I may miss a few details:
1. remove the whole ignition assembly from column-- it's not worth the
hassle to try and do this on the column.
2. drill a tiny hole a few mm down next to roll pin and pry pin up. Or, use
any other method you know/love to pry a roll pin up.
3. I think there is a face cap to take off. Ease it off and don't tear it,
it is soft metal. A ball bearing will fall out. It just sits in the front
end to make the cylinder slide back to retract the column bolt.
4. The cylinder should be able to pull out now. There is a spring and
square-ish piece under there.
5. Using stick pins, paper clips, and other small metal pieces you can
separate the wafers in the key way and push the key piece out from behind
(the tip). Or, pull the front wafers and springs out (being careful to watch
the order and location) and then remove the broken piece.
6. Re-assemble and test. Watch alignment, make sure the bearing is in the
right place and the cylnder does go back and retract the column bolt.
7. Put roll pin back in, and if the hole is too big, then a little JB Weld
might be in order but only to hold the pin in.


Angle drive-
It seems this just needed some elbow grease to come off. I was little
hesitant also, but once I got over it and applied some force the wrench it
came off easy enough.


-Kevin (not Ken... :)




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Message: 20
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 19:34:13 +0000
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>
Subject: Re: Performance Chips

How about: The DeLorean has electronic ignition, but only by virtue of 
an amplifier from an inductive pickup to remove the need for points. 
Fuelling and ignition timing is all purely mechanical. You can look up 
"K-Star" and "Milford Microsystems" on Google to find out about a system 
to retro-fit EFI and electronic ignition to the DeLorean engine without 
re-working the whole system.

Martin

Mark Noeltner wrote:

>[Moderator Note: Unless someone comes up with a DeLorean-related angle to the subject, I'm killing this thread.  - Mike Substelny DML moderator of the week]
>  
>





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Message: 21
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 18:34:46 -0000
From: "ksgrimsr" <knut.s.grimsrud_at_dml_intel.com>
Subject: Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply

Hi Rob (and others). I saw mention of my name in your post and 
tought it appropriate to post a note.

I indeed replaced my steering rack with a rebuilt unit from another 
vendor about a year ago. A writeup of my experience can be found in 
the DMCNews article archive at 
www.dmcnews.com/Techsection/steeringrack.html. I don't believe I 
have used a rebuilt rack from PJ Grady before and therefore do not 
have a basis for direct comparison. However, for those parts I have 
purchased from Rob, I have invariably been satisfied with the 
quality of the parts as well as the helpful service.

My lack of comment on some of the posts on the DML should not be 
interpreted as my agreement/concurrence with the message. Although I 
consider myself an enthusiast/hobbyist, I recognize that I am not an 
expert and therefore largely comment only in those cases where I 
have specific first-hand information to share that might be helpful 
to others on the list. In many other cases some of the material 
posted on this list is so obviously hosed that I feel no comment is 
necessary, and reasonably intelligent readers will be able to apply 
sound judgement in the material they read.

As owners we are foruntate that we enjoy quality parts and service 
from several vendors. I'm not sure specifically what you might be 
referring to in your post, but I consider my experience with the 
various vendors, including PJ Grady, to have been good and I value 
the service they provide.

       Knut


> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "PJ Grady Info" <info_at_dml_p...>
> To: "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_d...>
> Sent: Saturday, January 03, 2004 6:58 PM
> Subject: RE: Talks to God
> 

<snip>

> have a DeLorean business. Several other people on this list have 
had 
> similar problems with other vendors (are you listening Christian 
> etc? - and what about your experiences Knut?) but no one speaks 
> up...




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Message: 22
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 19:02:25 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Repairs

A locksmith CAN remove a broken bit of key without taking the lock
apart. He uses a tool called a key extactor which is a thin wire with
a reverse hook bent on the end. It is slipped up and over the ridges
of the piece of key and "hooked" onto the high ridge. By carefully
lifting the pins as you guide the broken bit out it can be done. It
takes a little experience and "finesse". The moral here is not to use
a worn or "pot metal" key. Get a good blank from brass and if it is
worn get another made BEFORE this happens.
 The ignition wires can be done without completely removing the
air/fuel mixture unit but again it takes a little experience. For a
novice the better advice is to remove it and check EVERYTHING while
you do it, it is much easier this way. A shop with more experience can
take some shortcuts that a beginner could not do. This is done
primaraly to save the customer time which is money. Since an owner
working on his own car isn't concerned about time it is always better
to avoid the "shortcuts".
The old injectors can be cleaned and saved so don't throw them away.
You will probably need new seals though.
To check the angle drive remove the front left wheel and turn the
square shaft in the center of the spindle. You should see the inside
piece of the angle drive turn as you turn the square shaft. Check if
the support bracket is missing for the lower cable. If it is missing
or broken you will need to order that too. While you are at the angle
drive loosen it so you can turn it over, remove the small screw on it
and lubricate it. You loosen it with a BIG wrench. Sometimes they are
VERY tight.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "cruznmd" <racuti1_at_dml_d...> wrote:
> This post will cover a varitey of little things so please bear with 
> me:
> 
> 1. As I stated before, I bought my car with one half of the ignition 
> key broken off in the switch. I use the half-key to start the car. I 
> hate this. -IS- it possible for a locksmith to dig that piece out of 
> there? I don't want to replace the switch and have a 2 key system or 
> rekey the whole dang car because of a 1/2 inch long piece of potmetal.
> 
> 2. Mike Cohee and I worked on my fuel system yesterday. Lesson 
> learned: Don't, just don't try to install plug wires on the 
> distributor cap by slightly lifting the air/fuel mixture unit. I've 
> been driving around with 2 wires disconnected. Only by completely 
> removing mine was I able to properly route and attach everything. 
> Also, I swapped my injectors for his old, but serviceble ones. I 
> think I have about as much power as I should. They probably clogged 
> because I waited too long to replace the filter.  Finally. I need to 
> 




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________________________________________________________________________


Message: 23
Date: Sun, 04 Jan 2004 21:36:55 -0000
From: "supermattthehero" <supermatty_at_dml_psu.edu>
Subject: Re: Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply

I felt compelled to respond to this when I saw it.  Here is my 
background:  I am a new owner (bought my car in July 2003) and have 
spoken with PJ Grady about 3 or 4 times. 

Each of those times, he has been very knowledge, friendly, and 
helpful.  I appreciate how he checks his e-mail regularly, and even 
when I forgot something with my order, I can send him an e-mail 
afterwards and he'll make the adjustment without issue.

The quality of the parts I have bought have all been A-1.  I *DID* 
purchase the upgraded taillight boards, stainless trailing arm 
brackets, fiberglass-reinforced headliners, door struts, window 
regulators, and many smaller items from him.  I am very glad to have 
someone like PJ Grady in business because nothing is more 
frustrating than to find out there are none of a particular part 
left.  This usually translates into me spending the next few months 
scouring e-bay or dmcnews for someone who wrecked their car and is 
parting it out.  By the way, does anyone have a good 'hood 
stop?' :)  

Getting back to the point, Rob, please don't stop making the 
taillight boards, radiator screens (I may need one when I get to 
that part of my restoration), or any of your other redesigned 
original parts.  They are all a valuable asset to the D community, 
and with time will be the only parts of their kind available, 
anywhere.  I know that as my car begins to fall apart, I'll be 
running to you for replacements.  As for the rest of the owners, 
please feel confident in purchasing from PJ Grady knowing that your 
hard-earned money will be contributing to the sustainment of your 
favorite toy.

Matt
#1604




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Message: 24
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2004 16:47:30 EST
From: rbrogren_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Digest Number 1820 Carbon buildup

I agree with David Teitelbaum that modern gas (and hotter running engines) 
has reduced carboning problems, however, during my recent water pump replacement 
I noticed that the intake valves and ports had significant carbon buildup and 
looked horrible! The injectors were just as bad and I shipped them off to Rob 
Grady who cleaned and tested them. I wasn't in the mood to pull the heads so 
the carbon on valve stems and intake ports is still there. The oil consumption 
is negligable.The Bosch spark plugs looked just right, light grey/brown and 
no noticable electrode wear, but I replaced them with the same grade anyway 
(copper tips).   My assumption is that the carbon has probably been there since 
the early 80's.

I am not about to run any Engine Top End Cleaner through this engine. I tried 
it on other engines years ago and that was quite a spectacle -- like 
Minnesota Mosquito Control was out pumping and the fog hung around the neighborhood 
for quite a while! I am not much of a believer in miracle concoctions to fix 
problems because in my experience they didn't do much good. (The exception is 
Marvel Mystery Oil, but that is another story!) 

Roger
Vin 1074


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 25
Date: Sun, 4 Jan 2004 17:59:04 EST
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: Rack & Pinion determination-Grady Reply

In a message dated 1/4/04 10:40:26 AM Central Standard Time, 
mpaine_at_dml_tycomsystems.com writes:
I, for one, am EXTREAMLY Happy with the products Rob manufactures and I 
am in need of some of them, - as I get the fuinds.

I hope you do plan on continuing your processes Rob and wish you GREAT 
business in '04!

regards,

Michael
vin 6067
>>>>>>>

I agree.  I have spent many thousands of dollars on Rob Grady's parts and 
services with a couple thousand to go until my car is perfect.  I find Rob's 
entire business atmosphere to be the very best out of all the others.  Rob has 
taken the time to help me even on his days off just to make my DeLorean ownership 
experience as enjoyable and productive as possible.  It is a damn shame that 
there are owners out there who have yet to experience his hopitality, product 
support, and professionalism.  From the first week of my ownership, I have had 
nothing but the highest praise for Rob and he has made a lifetime customer 
out of me.

Rob, no matter what specialty parts you build or commission, you are 
guaranteed that i will consider them for purchase.  there isn't a single thing you 
offer that is not THE BEST!

Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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