From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 2000
Date: Thursday, May 06, 2004 5:54 PM

There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. throttle cable tip
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

2. Re: Venturing for some thoughts...
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

3. Re: Torsion bars and door hinges
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

4. Re: Venturing for some thoughts... (I feel your pain...)
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

5. Re: Venturing for some thoughts...
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>

6. Torsion bars
From: Warren Turkal <wt_at_dml_midsouth.rr.com>

7. RE: throttle cable tip
From: "John Hervey" <john_at_dml_specialtauto.com>

8. Re: Re: Venturing for some thoughts... (I feel your pain...)
From: George DeLorean <phantomoftheopera_gk_at_dml_yahoo.com>

9. Re: Torsion bars and door hinges
From: "twinenginedmc12" <twinenginedmc12_at_dml_gendreaumicro.com>

10. tachometer
From: "dmc12hank" <henrik_at_dml_familjen.se>

11. Re: Venturing for some thoughts...
From: "B BENSON" <delornut_at_dml_peoplepc.com>

12. Re: May Tech Session - Western PA - Pittsburgh RSVP
From: Peter Lucas <lucas_at_dml_Maya.com>

13. Re: Venturing for some thoughts...
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

14. Re: PRV Fuel Enrichment
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

15. Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?
From: "supermattthehero" <supermatty_at_dml_psu.edu>

16. Re: Torsion bars
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

17. R12 Availability (was Re: AC Service)
From: "ryanpwright" <yahoo1_at_dml_ryanwright.com>

18. Pennebaker & Hegedus (a little long...)
From: "jakekamp" <jakekamp_at_dml_sbcglobal.net>

19. Re: Torsion bars
From: Marc Levy <malevy_nj_at_dml_yahoo.com>

20. Re: Re: PRV Fuel Enrichment
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>

21. Re: tachometer
From: Marc Levy <malevy_nj_at_dml_yahoo.com>

22. Re: Venturing for some thoughts...
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>

23. Re: tachometer
From: "Christopher Hawes" <chris_at_dml_hawes74.freeserve.co.uk>

24. Torsion bars removed.
From: "Wilhelm Starberg" <wilm_at_dml_broadpark.no>

25. Technical Battery and fuse question
From: "Kramer" <jettaman95_at_dml_yahoo.com>





Message: 1
Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 21:44:10 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: throttle cable tip

List,

some of you may want to inspect your throttle cable before heading out on a 
long journey away from home, such as Pigeon Forge.  i just got my throttle 
bracket and spool assembly from the bead blasters and found during reassembly that 
my throttle cable was frayed badly where it leaves the hollow metal screw.  i 
pulled it out from the pedal box side and found it was in poor shape, 
collapsing in another place from the frayed part a couple feet away.   

i was able to get a new piece of wire (bulk wire) from the local hardware 
store (20 feet at 8 cents a foot) and a hollow metal shot end piece that you 
thread the pedal box side of the wire thru , then you take a hammer and crush the 
round shot, making it flat and a perfect fit for the u-shaped bracket that 
holds the cable to the foot feed.

i had some lithium grease i bought for the throttle spool and greased the 
wire before installing it by feeding it back up thru the pedal box.  i was able 
to get a clean enough cut on the wire by using a cutting disc from my dremel.  
threaded it thru, adjusted the throttle, and now i have a new cable for about 
$1.75 total, plus 1/2 hour labor.

just a tip for anyone else out there in a similar predicament.  if your 
sheath is damaged, i would imagine that a vendor is the only way to go.

Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 2
Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 22:11:01 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Venturing for some thoughts...

In a message dated 5/5/04 6:15:21 PM Central Daylight Time, 
phantomoftheopera_gk_at_dml_yahoo.com writes:


> Some other things that came to mind were the engine
> hot/no-start prob. associated with the fuel
> accumulator, if my memory serves.  Not to mention a
> whole boat load of special tools for the PRV itself. 
> I don't mean to trash or discredit the PRV, I am just
> going with something that is easier serviced and so
> on.  Again, if I am amiss there, please do correct me.
> That's it for now, and hope to hear back from you
> soon.

Luckily for you (and the rest of us), we have very dedicated vendors and some 
very smart DML members.  reliability of the PRV or 'special tool' problems 
are not even a factor.  whoever told you this was misinformed or happens to own 
one with a trashed engine (a rarity in itself).  

i also googled the engine idea you have and found that it produces about 88hp 
(not sure if that's gross or net).  many owners find the PRV to be just 
adequate in performance.  that ford motor would be worse than anemic, in fact it 
would not be a fun car to drive at all.  with the high cost of a conversion 
(what transmission do you plan to use?), extreme value depreciation, and 
diminished fun-factor, the PRV would have to be an engine that only lasts 50K miles for 
you to want to consider this undertaking.  as it is, there are many deloreans 
with well over 150K on them and still running strong.  the PRV is tough tough 
motor, and the parts aren't as expensive as you seem to think.

as for aftermarket support, the vendors are doing a good job with that in the 
last couple of years, and as for hot/cold start problems - all i have to say 
to that is put about $400 right into your fuel system when you buy the car and 
you won't have any fuel problems for a very long time.  the people with fuel 
problems are the ones with cars that aren't sorted out or have original parts 
that should have been replaced years ago.  

Good Luck!
Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 3
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 02:22:31 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Torsion bars and door hinges

The distance between the torsion bar and the rear door hinge seems to
vary from car to car. On some I see it touching. I recomend cutting a
piece of inner tube (or heavy rubber) about 1"x2" and slipping it in
between the torsion bar and the hinge. You can grab the torsion bar
and pull it away to get enough room to slip it in. Don't wear any
rings while you do it, you don't want to scratch the torsion bar.
Check both sides.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Wilhelm Starberg" <wilm_at_dml_b...> wrote:
> Hi,
> 
> I'm have noticed that my torsion bars and door hinges are really
> close to each other - is this normal? how far apart should they be?
> 
> I've got a picture and some more info here(on top of the page):
> 
> http://home.broadpark.no/~wstarber/dmc/log.html
> 
> Also, is it possible to remove the panel that the torsion bar
> brackets are mounted on? I want to straighten it out and 
> epoxy it on before I install screws as described in "T-Bar Roof 
> Reinforcement" (http://www.dmcnews.com/Techsection/tbar.htm).
> 
> Anyone tried that? is the panel fastened only by glue, or are there
> hidden screws/bolts somewhere? I can't find the panel in the parts 
> manual...
> 
> Any help appreciated.
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Wilhelm S.
> #10816




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 4
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 02:41:24 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: Venturing for some thoughts... (I feel your pain...)

I understand exactly where you are at this point of ownership. Before
I took posession of #5939, PRV was my biggest concern too (see Message
#25848 -- those were the days...). Now, it's my LEAST concern.

eMail me off list (brobertson(at)carolina.net) and I'll walk you
through my own experience.

While uncommon on this side of the pond, PRV was used extensively
throughout Europe. Nearly 1 million units were built over a quarter
century production run. Not only is it a hardy little engine, but
parts availability for everything down to the main crank is excellent.

My recommendation is to find the best condition vehicle you can
afford, with a factory power plant, then get your feet wet with actual
ownership. Trust me: 1001 other things will pop up to consume all your
time and patience before the engine ever will (*IF* you give it a
COMPLETE tune-up and replace every cooling system hose and O ring).

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, George DeLorean
<phantomoftheopera_gk_at_dml_y...> wrote:
> Thanks to all for a great response! :)
>    I was basically thinking of how the 1.8/9 is common
> with more available parts, easier to work on, etc.  I
> was also thinking about the long run where it would be
> less expensive to have a Ford engine rather than the
> PRV.  I guess the main thing I am thinking about is
> that aren't parts, even down to stuff like wires/plugs
> for the PRV hard to find/expensive?  That was the main
> focus I had in mind.  Plus, I am familiar with the 1.9
> seeing as how I drive a car with it. :)  Aside from
> those things though, I wouldn't mind the PRV.  
>    Some other things that came to mind were the engine
> hot/no-start prob. associated with the fuel
> accumulator, if my memory serves.  Not to mention a
> whole boat load of special tools for the PRV itself. 
> I don't mean to trash or discredit the PRV, I am just
> going with something that is easier serviced and so
> on.  Again, if I am amiss there, please do correct me.
> That's it for now, and hope to hear back from you
> soon.
> 
>                       Sincerely,
> 
>                    George DeLorean
> 
> 
> 	
> 		
> __________________________________
> Do you Yahoo!?
> Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
> http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 5
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 00:29:20 -0400
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>
Subject: Re: Venturing for some thoughts...

Marc's assessment is what I would consider the most accurate of all.

Those of you with good running engine and solid car history are blessed. 

I believe that the PRV CAN be a reliable engine, but this is not
necessarily always the case.  

Parts for the PRV are not exceptionally expensive.  The service IS. 
Price out engine work at one of the 'dedicated vendors'.  When I first
got my car, it ran absolutely horribly.  I tried to find someone in the
area to look at the car, and could find NOT ONE shop that was willing to
work on the car/engine.  Of course, it did not help that the car ran
horribly, because it couldn't be driven to anywhere, plus was incapable
of passing emissions testing.  This situation often ends with someone
trying to fix the car themselves- which sometimes goes full circle; where
it runs horribly and they sell to someone else.

I counted SIX different methods of fuel enrichment that the engine
employs.  When more than one of these systems are failing, bypassed, or
10 other things that a backyard mechanic might decide to do, tracking
down the problems gets time consuming and expensive in parts.  

Not everyone has the right tools to diagnose fuel or ignition problems. 
Control pressure regulators and fuel distributors aren't just sitting
around so you can check if what you have is functioning correctly.   You
need to be certain of what is causing your problems, because spending
hundreds on a CPR, fuel distributor, ignition distributor, etc add up
very quickly.  

If you like to work on your car(s), the Delorean is not a bad choice.  As
far as cars go, it is rather well laid out, I think.  1000 things have
their own little place and perform exactly one task.  

I will say on the PRV's behalf.  It does like to RUN.  Most cars I've
owned are either running perfect or something is very very wrong.  I've
seen countless PRVs in various states of functioning- from 10 to 100% and
everywhere in between.

Jim
1537


On Wed, 5 May 2004 10:58:13 -0700 (PDT) Marc Levy <malevy_nj_at_dml_yahoo.com>
writes:
> Cost of conversion is not cheap.  If you have not
> purchased the car yet, find one that has a well
> maintained engine.  There is nothing specificaly
> unreliable about the PRV as compared to other engine
> choices.
> 
> Conversion is a good way to get more power, not less..
>


________________________________________________________________
The best thing to hit the Internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
Surf the Web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 6
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 02:33:57 -0500
From: Warren Turkal <wt_at_dml_midsouth.rr.com>
Subject: Torsion bars

I have seen so much talk of the left torsion bars being in short supply. Is 
anyone working on a replacement part? If so, when should we expect to see it 
on the market. I am really worried about getting a DeLorean if this part is 
just not available.

wt
-- 
Warren Turkal
President, GOLUM, Inc.
http://www.golum.org



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 7
Date: Wed, 5 May 2004 23:45:59 -0500
From: "John Hervey" <john_at_dml_specialtauto.com>
Subject: RE: throttle cable tip

Andy, Grease and oil attracts dirt and grime and will make it stop up
quicker. If the cable is clean and no burrs on the inside then I would leave
it dry.
John





-----Original Message-----
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com [mailto:Soma576_at_dml_aol.com]
Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2004 7:44 PM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: [DML] throttle cable tip


List,

some of you may want to inspect your throttle cable before heading out on a
long journey away from home, such as Pigeon Forge.  i just got my throttle
bracket and spool assembly from the bead blasters and found during
reassembly that
my throttle cable was frayed badly where it leaves the hollow metal screw.
i
pulled it out from the pedal box side and found it was in poor shape,
collapsing in another place from the frayed part a couple feet away.

i was able to get a new piece of wire (bulk wire) from the local hardware
store (20 feet at 8 cents a foot) and a hollow metal shot end piece that you
thread the pedal box side of the wire thru , then you take a hammer and
crush the
round shot, making it flat and a perfect fit for the u-shaped bracket that
holds the cable to the foot feed.

i had some lithium grease i bought for the throttle spool and greased the
wire before installing it by feeding it back up thru the pedal box.  i was
able
to get a clean enough cut on the wire by using a cutting disc from my
dremel.
threaded it thru, adjusted the throttle, and now i have a new cable for
about
$1.75 total, plus 1/2 hour labor.

just a tip for anyone else out there in a similar predicament.  if your
sheath is damaged, i would imagine that a vendor is the only way to go.

Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com

For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see www.dmcnews.com

To search the archives or view files, log in at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
Yahoo! Groups Links









________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 8
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 00:40:39 -0700 (PDT)
From: George DeLorean <phantomoftheopera_gk_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Re: Venturing for some thoughts... (I feel your pain...)

Thanks once again to all.
   I am now considering staying with the PRV when I do
buy my DMC.  As for the 1.9 L, it wouldn't just be a
stock engine.  It would have some stuff like turbos,
NOS, etc.  I will say this, though.  When I buy my
DMC, I will stay with the PRV for a while anyways.  If
it meets with my satisfaction, I will keep it as is.

                       Signed,

                      George D.


	
		
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover 



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 9
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 11:32:58 -0000
From: "twinenginedmc12" <twinenginedmc12_at_dml_gendreaumicro.com>
Subject: Re: Torsion bars and door hinges

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Wilhelm Starberg" <wilm_at_dml_b...> wrote:
> Hi,
> 
> I'm have noticed that my torsion bars and door hinges are really
> close to each other - is this normal? how far apart should they be?
> 
> I've got a picture and some more info here(on top of the page):
> 
> http://home.broadpark.no/~wstarber/dmc/log.html
> 
> Also, is it possible to remove the panel that the torsion bar
> brackets are mounted on? I want to straighten it out and 
> epoxy it on before I install screws as described in "T-Bar Roof 
> Reinforcement" (http://www.dmcnews.com/Techsection/tbar.htm).
> 
> Anyone tried that? is the panel fastened only by glue, or are there
> hidden screws/bolts somewhere? I can't find the panel in the parts 
> manual...
> 
> Any help appreciated.
> 
> Regards,
> 
> Wilhelm S.
> #10816

Hi Wilhelm.

Yes, it's possible to remove the panel that the torsion bar brackets 
are mounted on.  On my car, it was glued and held in with some 
rivets.  I had to drill out the rivets to remove it.  I glued it back 
down with polyurethane glue, and screwed it into place with several 
sheet metal screws. Dave Swingle also did a similar repair.  I'm sure 
there are others.

If your car sat outside in the rain for a long time, you may wish to 
inspect the roof support for rust.  On my car, it was quite rusty, 
rusty enough that I decided to remove it, sandblast it in and out, 
and repaint it.  If yours is not too bad, I'd leave it alone.  

Be careful with the torsion bars.  Even a small scratch can make them 
break.  Removing torsion bars is a two person job.

Rick Gendreau





________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 10
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 09:24:03 -0000
From: "dmc12hank" <henrik_at_dml_familjen.se>
Subject: tachometer

My tachometer isnīt working, itīs stuck on 8000 rpm.
Is there any way of testing if itīs a tach issue or a wire issue.
I dont wanna buy a new tachometer just to find out itīs a bad cable.
Iīve asked this before but Iīll try again.
Henrik.





________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 11
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 10:15:27 -0500
From: "B BENSON" <delornut_at_dml_peoplepc.com>
Subject: Re: Venturing for some thoughts...

I agree with much of what's said here. The engine is a bit complex and
requires a good understanding of what needs to be done to make things
correct on the mechanical end but the fuel injection is typical Bosch
K-Jetronic and there are hundreds of shops around the world that have a very
good understanding of this system. There are thousands, if not millions, of
cars running around the world with this injection system.  IMHO I think it's
the exotic look of the DeLorean and the misconceptions about it's workings
that scare many otherwise competent shops from agreeing to work on the car.

Bruce Benson



> I believe that the PRV CAN be a reliable engine, but this is not
> necessarily always the case.
>
> Parts for the PRV are not exceptionally expensive.  The service IS.
> Price out engine work at one of the 'dedicated vendors'.  When I first
> got my car, it ran absolutely horribly.  I tried to find someone in the
> area to look at the car, and could find NOT ONE shop that was willing to
> work on the car/engine. .  This situation often ends with someone
> trying to fix the car themselves- which sometimes goes full circle; where
> it runs horribly and they sell to someone else.
>
> I counted SIX different methods of fuel enrichment that the engine
> employs.  When more than one of these systems are failing, bypassed, or
> 10 other things that a backyard mechanic might decide to do, tracking
> down the problems gets time consuming and expensive in parts.
>
> Not everyone has the right tools to diagnose fuel or ignition problems.
> Control pressure regulators and fuel distributors aren't just sitting
> around so you can check if what you have is functioning correctly.   You
> need to be certain of what is causing your problems, because spending
> hundreds on a CPR, fuel distributor, ignition distributor, etc add up
> very quickly.
> Jim
> 1537




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 12
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 12:04:52 -0400
From: Peter Lucas <lucas_at_dml_Maya.com>
Subject: Re: May Tech Session - Western PA - Pittsburgh RSVP

Hi, Dan,

Well, the good news is that Saturday is going to be a "DeLorean Day" 
for me.  The bad news is that it won't be at the tech session.   I just 
got my newly rebuilt transmission back from Grady and I really need the 
time to get it in (having the D. in the garage during this nice weather 
is killing me!).  It would be a great project to bring to the session, 
but I can't quite make that work. :-).

Please pass on my regrets to the group and I hope you all have a great 
time.

Cheers,

-Pete




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 13
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 12:42:26 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Venturing for some thoughts...

In a message dated 5/6/04 9:23:22 AM Central Daylight Time, 
ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com writes:


> Not everyone has the right tools to diagnose fuel or ignition problems. 
> Control pressure regulators and fuel distributors aren't just sitting
> around so you can check if what you have is functioning correctly.   You
> need to be certain of what is causing your problems, because spending
> hundreds on a CPR, fuel distributor, ignition distributor, etc add up
> very quickly.  


True, but a K-Jet fuel pressure gauge will pinpoint pretty much any problem 
in either the CPR or the fuel distributor. check your primary pressure to find 
restrictions in the lines or lower chamber, and switch over to control 
pressure to watch your pressure increase as radiant temperature increases. at $90 
from mytoolstore.com, a pressure gauge is a very wise investment, and certainly 
that anyone who owns a DeLorean should be able to afford.  it can't tell you 
everything about the fuel system, but it's a crucial starting point.

Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 14
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 16:24:13 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: PRV Fuel Enrichment

Actually the PRV runs quite well with absolutely no fuel enrichment
whatsoever. I know because that's how I took possession of my own
copy. Had fuel metering of course, but no enrichment beyond that.

I am now running one enrichment mechanism only -- through the CPR (038
series, much simpler than 066). 

Martin Gutkowski has also jetisoned most of his Lambda based
enrichment mechanisms with good results.

Do not confuse the core engine with later bolt on systems.

Earliest PRV's were carbureted -- the epitome of simple. Didn't
receive fuel injection until 1975. Didn't receive our K Jetronic
system until 1978 or 1979. All this happened north of the heads --
engine itself remained unchanged until 1987 (albeit with varying
pistons and connecting rods, and of course the increase in cylinder size).

Remember: anything added to an engine can be removed later, returning
it "to basics".

List member in California plans to do a carburetor conversion (A
series manifold) on his stock DeLo PRV this summer. Factory ignition
will remain intact. I can't wait for the results to be posted...

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_j...>
wrote:
> 
> I counted SIX different methods of fuel enrichment that the engine
> employs.  When more than one of these systems are failing, bypassed, or
> 10 other things that a backyard mechanic might decide to do, tracking
> down the problems gets time consuming and expensive in parts.  
> 






________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 15
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 17:52:24 -0000
From: "supermattthehero" <supermatty_at_dml_psu.edu>
Subject: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?

Would someone be willing to outline the trailing arm bolt replacement
procedure using a jack and jack stands?  I want to be sure that I know
where to place the stands when doing this.  I've read all the articles
so I know that I need to raise the car (by the body jacking point? by
the frame?), replace the bolt, snug it up, and then lower the car
before torquing the bolts. (how can I still fit underneath the car
when the weight is on the wheels?)  I prefer to do all of the work on
the car myself aside from inspection, so any help is appreciated.

Matt
#1604




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 16
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 17:09:18 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Torsion bars

There is a *limited* supply of left side torsion bars. If you get a
car with good bars they have a very low failure rate. As long as you
don't touch them, scratch them, adjust them, you should not have to
worry about replacing them. The Delorean venders are acutely aware of
ALL the parts that have limited availabilty, including the torsion
bars. DMC Houston is working on having them made along with many other
parts. You should understand that it is in their business interest to
keep Deloreans going and since this is their entire livelyhood they
will not let it die because of any one part. They buy and sell cars so
if they have one that needs a torsion bar they can't sell it if they
can't fix it. From time to time some parts may become difficult or
expensive to obtain but that is to be expected for any orphaned make.
Another part that worries some is the left front fender. Since there
are Deloreans being parted out there should be enough parts for the
near future although they may get pricey. Look at what happened to
Stainless Steel Illusion. When demand exceeds supply things get
expensive until you hit the price-point that makes it possible to
reproduce it. You should not base your decision on buying a Delorean
on parts availability. A much more important issue is SERVICE. You
need to know in advance if you are going to do the work yourself or if
not where you will find someone competant to perform quality work on
your cherished possesion. An unqualified mechanic will take your car
and make it worthless to the point you will get disgusted and have to
sell it blaming the car and not your "trusted" mechanic. Every owner
can tell you about the things they found from the dreaded P.O.
(previous owner). Much of what you will do on the car will be to undo
previous work and redo it correctly with the correct parts. That is
unless you buy one from one of the Delorean venders.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757 


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Warren Turkal <wt_at_dml_m...> wrote:
> I have seen so much talk of the left torsion bars being in short
supply. Is 
> anyone working on a replacement part? If so, when should we expect
to see it 
> on the market. I am really worried about getting a DeLorean if this
part is 
> just not available.
> 
> wt
> -- 
> Warren Turkal
> President, GOLUM, Inc.
> http://www.golum.org




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 17
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 18:06:22 -0000
From: "ryanpwright" <yahoo1_at_dml_ryanwright.com>
Subject: R12 Availability (was Re: AC Service)

FWIW, I just had my AC system charged. Paid $40 a pound. Expensive,
but not like the $80+ a pound I was thinking I'd have to pay.

-Ryan

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "James Espey" <james_at_dml_u...> wrote:
> Not sure about back east where Harold lives (and California where
everything
> seems to be deemed environmentally unsafe), but here in Texas, R12
prices
> have been stedily dropping back to early 1990 levels. The word that
I have
> received from our supplier is that as all the new cars are now
running R134,
> and so many people were frightened into, or otherwise convinced that
they
> needed to convert to R134, demand for R12 has dropped so much that
prices
> are now considered "normal" again. Of course, if you have a leak in your
> system, it is against the law to refill it with R12. However, at
least here
> in Texas (and when I was in AZ) a properly functioning R12 system in a
> DeLorean will outperform a DeLorean converted to run on R134.
> 
> James
> 
> 
> Harold wrote:
> 
> The D does not have a sight-glass. The D has a CCOTT (cycling clutch
> orifice tube type) system which means that a sight glass is of no
> real value. Gauges are the main diagnostic tool. R-12 is not readily
> available to non-professionals, it is very expensive if you can
> still find it, can be dangerous, and it requires some special gear
> to handle properly.
> ---
> Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
> Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
> Version: 6.0.676 / Virus Database: 438 - Release Date: 5/3/2004




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 18
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 18:45:35 -0000
From: "jakekamp" <jakekamp_at_dml_sbcglobal.net>
Subject: Pennebaker & Hegedus (a little long...)

Hello all,


Most DeLorean owners know D A Pennebaker and Chris Hegedus as the 
creators of potentially the best (maybe 'only'?) DeLorean 
documentary.  For those unfamiliar with the film, you can see/buy it 
at www.deloreanmovie.com thanks to Dan McGauley.  I purchased a copy 
of this film a few years ago despite the price and, after seeing the 
video, was happy to have paid it.
 
Anyway, several weeks ago a co-worker drew my attention to an 
advertisement for a documentary showing at Webster University, a 
college here in the St. Louis, Missouri area.  The college had 
arranged a week of Pennebaker/Hegedus films to be shown, and one 
night included "DeLorean."  Naturally, I fired up the DeLo and headed 
over.
 
After showing the film "movie style" in an auditorium with about 35 
attendees, Pennebaker & Hegedus (who had been flown in from New York) 
gave an epilogue to the DeLorean story with a Q & A session.  
Immediately after showing the film, Pennebaker jokingly asked the 
crowd, "So, you all have DeLoreans, right??"  The crowed laughed, but 
I just raised my hand.  Then Hegedus looked at me and 
asked, "Really?"  I said, "Sure!  It's sitting out back in the 
parking lot!"
 
The Q & A session continued after I invited everyone out to see the 
car after the session.  I was impressed at the detail the filmmakers 
remembered about the DeLorean story after 23 years, and had almost 
all of their facts right on.  I politely corrected the minor stuff, 
and was asked to answer any car-specific questions (the usual stuff 
like how many, when built, etc.).  It was fascinating to hear stories 
from the filmmakers who probably had the best "outsider's" look 
inside the DeLorean Motor Company, and I was happy to hear how 
positively they still regarded the company and the car.
 
Later, we all went outside to see the my car.  Everyone was thrilled 
to see the fruits of John's labor after seeing the documentary.  I 
got talking to Pennebaker and Hegedus and found that while Pennebaker 
had spent a good deal of time in the car filming test pilots, etc., 
Chris Hegedus had *never* gotten a ride in a DeLorean!  Of course, I 
was happy to offer her a ride.  I drove her around a little while and 
she loved the ride, even commenting on how well my car ran after all 
this time.  It's funny that after spending 2 years with John and the 
company, in both the United States and in Belfast, it was 23 years 
later in St. Louis that she finally got a ride in a DeLorean.  After 
we returned to the school, I received lots of handshakes, thanking me 
for bringing my car out for everyone to see.  It's great to see all 
the excitement stirred up by a car that I drive every day.  Then 
again, I guess that's what owning these is all about...
 
--A great evening with a tremendously pleasant couple.
 
Speakin' up for me and 1063,
 
Jake Kamphoefner
 
 





________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 19
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 13:13:00 -0700 (PDT)
From: Marc Levy <malevy_nj_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Torsion bars

If you need one, you can find one.

You are going to base your decision to buy a car on
the availability of one part??

When I purchased my first DeLorean in 1992, I was told
there were only a handful of Left fenders around and
If I ever wrecked mine, the car would be trash.. 
There are more fenders now for sale than in 1992!  

Funny, because James was just talking about how the
cost of R-12 has gone DOWN in recent years..  I
believe the same logic applies to the "hard to find"
DeLorean parts.

If/when the part REALLY becomes impossible to find,
someone will either make new ones of find an
alternative.

--- Warren Turkal <wt_at_dml_midsouth.rr.com> wrote:
> I have seen so much talk of the left torsion bars
> being in short supply. Is 
> anyone working on a replacement part? If so, when
> should we expect to see it 
> on the market. I am really worried about getting a
> DeLorean if this part is 
> just not available.
> 
> wt
> -- 
> Warren Turkal
> President, GOLUM, Inc.
> http://www.golum.org



	
		
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover 



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 20
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 20:49:00 +0100
From: Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk>
Subject: Re: Re: PRV Fuel Enrichment

Well, what enrichment systems are there (I'm intrigued by Jim's total of 
six, so let's add 'em up)

1) Warm up enrichment - the most basic function of the control pressure 
regulator
2) Cold start valve - extra shot of fuel when the engine's below a 
certain temperature, controlled by the thermotime switch on the top of 
the water pump.
3) Accelleration enrichment - vacuum fed to the CPR via delay valve 
lowers control pressure when vacuum is "lost", but only for a few 
seconds, and only when the engine's cold
4) Lambda system enrichment - firstly during warm up, which is not 
strictly enrichment because it's just waiting for the exhaust sensor to 
get hot enough. However, this state in a hot engine results in rich 
running which is why this is used for...
5) Full throttle enrichment - effectively puts the lambda ecu into 
"warm-up" mode.
6) Errm. Not sure.

The B28E UK spec equivalent of the DeLorean engine did not have a cat or 
lambda system, so removing both and replacing with equivalent components 
yields pretty healthy power and torque gains. The CPR has constant 
accelleration enrichment, but to a lesser degree than the B28F. The 
ignition timing and fuelling curves differ and in the compromise of 
power, ecomony and emissions, where DeLorean leaned more towards economy 
and emissions, the B28E leans towards power.

Martin

content22207 wrote:

> Actually the PRV runs quite well with absolutely no fuel enrichment
> whatsoever. I know because that's how I took possession of my own
> copy. Had fuel metering of course, but no enrichment beyond that.
> 
> I am now running one enrichment mechanism only -- through the CPR (038
> series, much simpler than 066). 
> 
> Martin Gutkowski has also jetisoned most of his Lambda based
> enrichment mechanisms with good results.
> 





________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 21
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 13:15:52 -0700 (PDT)
From: Marc Levy <malevy_nj_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: tachometer

Is it stuck even when the car is off??  There is
probably a mechanical problem in the Tach, and not an
electrical issue because it works on pulses.  A broken
wire or short would cause it to stay at 0.

I had this happen to me on a non-DeLorean...  I fixed
it by revving the engine real high for a second.  The
needle recovered.

--- dmc12hank <henrik_at_dml_familjen.se> wrote:
> My tachometer isnīt working, itīs stuck on 8000 rpm.
> Is there any way of testing if itīs a tach issue or
> a wire issue.
> I dont wanna buy a new tachometer just to find out
> itīs a bad cable.
> Iīve asked this before but Iīll try again.
> Henrik.
> 



	
		
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover 



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 22
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 16:18:27 -0400
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>
Subject: Re: Venturing for some thoughts...

You're right!

I bought one, but when the fuel readings for my PRV were reasonably
close, it didn't help my problems at least.  

Even with appropriate primary and control pressure, there is no assurance
fuel is actually getting anywhere.  From the CO screw to plugged
injectors, dirty lines, frequency valve and leaky accumulators, there is
always something else.  Even when the injectors are new there is no
guarantee that they have the same flow rates.    

The hardest problems to diagnose are intermittent or in sets of 2 or
more.  

Jim
1537


On Thu, 6 May 2004 12:42:26 EDT Soma576_at_dml_aol.com writes:
> In a message dated 5/6/04 9:23:22 AM Central Daylight Time, 
> ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com writes:
> 
> 
> > Not everyone has the right tools to diagnose fuel or ignition 
> problems. 
> > Control pressure regulators and fuel distributors aren't just 
> sitting
> > around so you can check if what you have is functioning correctly. 
>   You
> > need to be certain of what is causing your problems, because 
> spending
> > hundreds on a CPR, fuel distributor, ignition distributor, etc add 
> up
> > very quickly.  
> 
> 
> True, but a K-Jet fuel pressure gauge will pinpoint pretty much any 
> problem 
> in either the CPR or the fuel distributor. check your primary 
> pressure to find 
> restrictions in the lines or lower chamber, and switch over to 
> control 
> pressure to watch your pressure increase as radiant temperature 
> increases. at $90 
> from mytoolstore.com, a pressure gauge is a very wise investment, 
> and certainly 
> that anyone who owns a DeLorean should be able to afford.  it can't 
> tell you 
> everything about the fuel system, but it's a crucial starting point.
> 
> Andy
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
> 
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating team, please 
> address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see 
> www.dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at 
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> Yahoo! Groups Links
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 
> 


________________________________________________________________
The best thing to hit the Internet in years - Juno SpeedBand!
Surf the Web up to FIVE TIMES FASTER!
Only $14.95/ month - visit www.juno.com to sign up today!



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 23
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 21:27:48 +0100
From: "Christopher Hawes" <chris_at_dml_hawes74.freeserve.co.uk>
Subject: Re: tachometer

the nuts that hold the tacho into the casing also complete the circuit, if
they have worked loose, it may explain your now dead tacho.  Mine was
twitchy due to loose nuts, after a quick tighten, my tacho now is as good as
new.

Chris H.

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "dmc12hank" <henrik_at_dml_familjen.se>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 06, 2004 10:24 AM
Subject: [DML] tachometer


My tachometer isnīt working, itīs stuck on 8000 rpm.
Is there any way of testing if itīs a tach issue or a wire issue.
I dont wanna buy a new tachometer just to find out itīs a bad cable.
Iīve asked this before but Iīll try again.
Henrik.





To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com

For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see www.dmcnews.com

To search the archives or view files, log in at
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
Yahoo! Groups Links








________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 24
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 20:50:12 -0000
From: "Wilhelm Starberg" <wilm_at_dml_broadpark.no>
Subject: Torsion bars removed.

I removed my torsion bars today, it went like a charm, pictures
and some info here:

http://home.broadpark.no/~wstarber/dmc/torsion.html

Both my bars had been touching the hinges, and had a small dents,
I'll put some rubber between the hinge and bar - thanks for the tip 
David.

(msg. #41086)
Rick: did you have to remove the doors when you removed the
torsion bar bracket plate? It seems like my door hinges are mounted
on top of that plate? are there different versions out there?


Regards,
Wilhelm S.
#10816




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 25
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 21:23:03 -0000
From: "Kramer" <jettaman95_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Technical Battery and fuse question

Dear List,
  Over the last months I have been working towards becoming a future 
auto tech. Anyway I have been going through basic electrical and 
studying batteries. I did not know that a by-product of the 
discharging is the release of hydorgen gas.
  Could this be part of the reason that fuses in the fuse box melt 
and need replacement more then other cars? Is there anyway to protect 
them? (Just a thought)
    ~Kramer
    #10610




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com

For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see www.dmcnews.com

To search the archives or view files, log in at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
     http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews/

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
     dmcnews-unsubscribe_at_dml_yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------