From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 2001
Date: Thursday, May 06, 2004 10:16 PM

There are 11 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?
From: "therealdmcvegas" <dmcvegas_at_dml_cox.net>

2. Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

3. Re: Torsion bars
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

4. Re: throttle cable tip
From: "Harold McElraft" <hmcelraft_at_dml_aol.com>

5. Re: PRV Fuel Enrichment
From: "Harold McElraft" <hmcelraft_at_dml_aol.com>

6. Re: Technical Battery and fuse question
From: "Harold McElraft" <hmcelraft_at_dml_aol.com>

7. Re: Hard/No Starting - Solved!
From: "Jason Rowe" <rowejj_at_dml_tds.net>

8. What are these things?
From: "ryanpwright" <yahoo1_at_dml_ryanwright.com>

9. Re: Re: PRV Fuel Enrichment
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>

10. Local tire shop
From: DMCVIN6683 <dmcvin6683_at_dml_wi.rr.com>

11. DMC Storage
From: "Aaron Crocco" <Slider_ten_at_dml_hotmail.com>





Message: 1
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 20:59:20 -0000
From: "therealdmcvegas" <dmcvegas_at_dml_cox.net>
Subject: Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?

Jacking up the car is not nessisary, in *most* cases. And besides, 
you must torque the bolts with the weight of the car on the 
suspension.

Go to the auto parts store, and get yourself a set of ramps. 
Preferably the highest you can find, with the most gentle incline. 
Rhino brand ramps are excellent.

Back the car onto the ramps, and chock the front wheels. Your next 
step is to remove the sheilds that protect the Trailing Arms, and the 
Drive Axles. From here, count the shims, and remove the bolts. Then 
just install everything in reverse. Using fresh hardware, of course.

The only problem that I ran into when replacing my TABs was alignment 
with the passenger side Trailing Arm. I had to wedge the TA up, and 
pull it forward to get the holes to align. Driver's side went off 
without a hitch. That was the biggest thing I ran into. So on a scale 
of 1-5, I'd rate replacing your TABs _at_dml_ a 2.

Now as I said before, this method will work on *most* DeLoreans. If 
your car is lowered in the front, the pitch may force the spoiler to 
scrape the ground, depending upon how low you decided to go. And if 
you've got an Automatic Transmission, there is an extra step that 
you'll need to go thru, in order to get to these bolts.

Hope this helps ya!

-Robert
vin 6585 "X"



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "supermattthehero" <supermatty_at_dml_p...> 
wrote:
> Would someone be willing to outline the trailing arm bolt 
replacement
> procedure using a jack and jack stands?  I want to be sure that I 
know
> where to place the stands when doing this.  I've read all the 
articles
> so I know that I need to raise the car (by the body jacking point? 
by
> the frame?), replace the bolt, snug it up, and then lower the car
> before torquing the bolts. (how can I still fit underneath the car
> when the weight is on the wheels?)  I prefer to do all of the work 
on
> the car myself aside from inspection, so any help is appreciated.
> 
> Matt
> #1604




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Message: 2
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 21:22:24 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?

Leave the car on the stands, place the floor jack under each tire,
then raise them to a normal driving orientation.

I don't jack my car by its fragile fiberglass body, preferring instead
the relatively sturdier frame. Central rear jacking point is the
crossmember (just like a front engine car turned around backwards). I
place my jackstands where the lower support arms mount to it.

Notice how close together the stands are in the rear vs the front. Our
chassis is trapezoidal shaped -- wider in the front than the rear.
This keeps the outside edges of the two different sized tires in line
with one another for aesthetic purposes.

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "supermattthehero" <supermatty_at_dml_p...>
wrote:
> Would someone be willing to outline the trailing arm bolt replacement
> procedure using a jack and jack stands?  I want to be sure that I know
> where to place the stands when doing this.  I've read all the articles
> so I know that I need to raise the car (by the body jacking point? by
> the frame?), replace the bolt, snug it up, and then lower the car
> before torquing the bolts. (how can I still fit underneath the car
> when the weight is on the wheels?)  I prefer to do all of the work on
> the car myself aside from inspection, so any help is appreciated.
> 
> Matt
> #1604




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Message: 3
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 21:26:35 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: Torsion bars

At one time John Hervey was experimenting with an Acme screw
replacement. Re-inventing the wheel to be sure, but he may one day
come up with a functional low cost alternative that could be used in a
pinch if nothing else.

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_w...> wrote:
> There is a *limited* supply of left side torsion bars. If you get a
> car with good bars they have a very low failure rate. As long as you
> don't touch them, scratch them, adjust them, you should not have to
> worry about replacing them. The Delorean venders are acutely aware of
> ALL the parts that have limited availabilty, including the torsion
> bars. DMC Houston is working on having them made along with many other
> parts. You should understand that it is in their business interest to
> keep Deloreans going and since this is their entire livelyhood they
> will not let it die because of any one part. They buy and sell cars so
> if they have one that needs a torsion bar they can't sell it if they
> can't fix it. From time to time some parts may become difficult or
> expensive to obtain but that is to be expected for any orphaned make.





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Message: 4
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 21:38:05 -0000
From: "Harold McElraft" <hmcelraft_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: throttle cable tip

I would agree or as the instructions for the spool cover kit call 
for - antifreeze.

Harold McElraft - 3354


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "John Hervey" <john_at_dml_s...> wrote:
> Andy, Grease and oil attracts dirt and grime and will make it stop 
up
> quicker. If the cable is clean and no burrs on the inside then I 
would leave
> it dry.
> John
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Soma576_at_dml_a... [mailto:Soma576_at_dml_a...]
> Sent: Wednesday, May 05, 2004 7:44 PM
> To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [DML] throttle cable tip
> 
> 
> List,
> 
> some of you may want to inspect your throttle cable before heading 
out on a
> long journey away from home, such as Pigeon Forge.  i just got my 
throttle
> bracket and spool assembly from the bead blasters and found during
> reassembly that
> my throttle cable was frayed badly where it leaves the hollow 
metal screw.
> i
> pulled it out from the pedal box side and found it was in poor 
shape,
> collapsing in another place from the frayed part a couple feet 
away.
> 
> i was able to get a new piece of wire (bulk wire) from the local 
hardware
> store (20 feet at 8 cents a foot) and a hollow metal shot end 
piece that you
> thread the pedal box side of the wire thru , then you take a 
hammer and
> crush the
> round shot, making it flat and a perfect fit for the u-shaped 
bracket that
> holds the cable to the foot feed.
> 
> i had some lithium grease i bought for the throttle spool and 
greased the
> wire before installing it by feeding it back up thru the pedal 
box.  i was
> able
> to get a clean enough cut on the wire by using a cutting disc from 
my
> dremel.
> threaded it thru, adjusted the throttle, and now i have a new 
cable for
> about
> $1.75 total, plus 1/2 hour labor.
> 
> just a tip for anyone else out there in a similar predicament.  if 
your
> sheath is damaged, i would imagine that a vendor is the only way 
to go.
> 
> Andy
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
> 
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating team, please 
address:
> moderators_at_dml_d...
> 
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see 
www.dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
> Yahoo! Groups Links




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Message: 5
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 23:43:58 -0000
From: "Harold McElraft" <hmcelraft_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: PRV Fuel Enrichment

On the DeLorean K-Jetronic, there is a by-pass valve in the throttle 
plates that overcome the lean condition created by deceleration. 
No.6.

Harold McElraft - 3354


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Martin Gutkowski <webmaster_at_dml_d...> 
wrote:
> Well, what enrichment systems are there (I'm intrigued by Jim's 
total of 
> six, so let's add 'em up)
> 
> 1) Warm up enrichment - the most basic function of the control 
pressure 
> regulator
> 2) Cold start valve - extra shot of fuel when the engine's below a 
> certain temperature, controlled by the thermotime switch on the 
top of 
> the water pump.
> 3) Accelleration enrichment - vacuum fed to the CPR via delay 
valve 
> lowers control pressure when vacuum is "lost", but only for a few 
> seconds, and only when the engine's cold
> 4) Lambda system enrichment - firstly during warm up, which is not 
> strictly enrichment because it's just waiting for the exhaust 
sensor to 
> get hot enough. However, this state in a hot engine results in 
rich 
> running which is why this is used for...
> 5) Full throttle enrichment - effectively puts the lambda ecu into 
> "warm-up" mode.
> 6) Errm. Not sure.
> 
> The B28E UK spec equivalent of the DeLorean engine did not have a 
cat or 
> lambda system, so removing both and replacing with equivalent 
components 
> yields pretty healthy power and torque gains. The CPR has constant 
> accelleration enrichment, but to a lesser degree than the B28F. 
The 
> ignition timing and fuelling curves differ and in the compromise 
of 
> power, ecomony and emissions, where DeLorean leaned more towards 
economy 
> and emissions, the B28E leans towards power.
> 
> Martin
> 
> content22207 wrote:
> 
> > Actually the PRV runs quite well with absolutely no fuel 
enrichment
> > whatsoever. I know because that's how I took possession of my own
> > copy. Had fuel metering of course, but no enrichment beyond that.
> > 
> > I am now running one enrichment mechanism only -- through the 
CPR (038
> > series, much simpler than 066). 
> > 
> > Martin Gutkowski has also jetisoned most of his Lambda based
> > enrichment mechanisms with good results.
> >




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Message: 6
Date: Thu, 06 May 2004 23:59:16 -0000
From: "Harold McElraft" <hmcelraft_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: Technical Battery and fuse question

I believe your observation is correct and the only real cure is - 
Ventilation! 

In some cars with batteries in the trunk or under the back seat a 
vent connected directly to the battery is used to direct any gases 
to the outside. Lincoln has one for the LS that I have been 
investigating because it connects directly to a vent similar to 
those on Delco batteries. Since there is a vent in the back of the 
DeLorean battery case, a straight forward adaptation appears 
probable. If I come up with something that appears to work I will 
post it.

Harold McElraft - 3354


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Kramer" <jettaman95_at_dml_y...> wrote:
> Dear List,
>   Over the last months I have been working towards becoming a 
future 
> auto tech. Anyway I have been going through basic electrical and 
> studying batteries. I did not know that a by-product of the 
> discharging is the release of hydorgen gas.
>   Could this be part of the reason that fuses in the fuse box melt 
> and need replacement more then other cars? Is there anyway to 
protect 
> them? (Just a thought)
>     ~Kramer
>     #10610




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Message: 7
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 19:05:00 -0700
From: "Jason Rowe" <rowejj_at_dml_tds.net>
Subject: Re: Hard/No Starting - Solved!

     Hey all, 
               For those that were helping me with my no starting problem I'd
like to send out a big thanks to them. I haven't been able to work on it for
the last few days, been busy and have a sick animal to tend too. 
        
                Anyway, got around to it today. I was convinced that it wasn't
a vaccuum or fuel issue so I started with spark on someones suggestion.
Turns out that the new MSD Blaster 2 that put on over the winter is either
bad or my car just doesn't really like it. I put on the 20+ year original and it
fired right up and ran perfect. Starts every time now. So now my question is
when I put the msd coil on I also put on 8mm wires. Now that I'm back to the
original coil would it still be ok to use the 8mm or should I go back to the original
7mm? What would the effects be with the new wires?  

               I guess I'm just gonna buy a new original bosch coil to put on. Thanks
again to everyone that replied. You were all great.

                                Jason #5903

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 8
Date: Fri, 07 May 2004 01:41:08 -0000
From: "ryanpwright" <yahoo1_at_dml_ryanwright.com>
Subject: What are these things?

A few things I've found on my car:

1. Driver's side, under the dash. Just ahead of the clutch pedal is a
little white (yellowish, due to age) box with two cables. I'm almost
certain this is part of the speedometer; one cable goes into the floor
and the other into the dash. However, there is an electrical connector
here, and it's been disconnected. What's it do?

2. Passenger's side, under the dash. From the far right (closest to
the exterior) of the car is a vaccumn line. It's hanging down, 2-3
feet long, connected to nothing. What is this and where does it go?

3. Between the spare tire and the dash, just to the left of the fuel
pump (when looking at the pump from the front of the car). My two fuel
lines snake into the abyss. Further left is some A/C related stuff.
Between the A/C stuff and the fuel pump, sitting at the "bottom" is a
black rubber hose. Slightly thicker than the fuel lines. It's just
sitting there, with one end snaking into the dash and the other end
wide open, connected to nothing. What's it for?

Thank you for your assistance,

-Ryan




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Message: 9
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 22:07:30 -0400
From: Jim Strickland <ihaveanaccount_at_dml_juno.com>
Subject: Re: Re: PRV Fuel Enrichment

I don't remember exactly which 6.  I just remember back in the good old
days that I came up with that number.  

Here's some
1) warm up regulator circuit (electronic CPR bimetallic arm heater)
2) acceleration enrichment (vacuum controlled control pressure)
3) CPR (engine radiating heat affecting bimetallic arm)
4) Cold start valve
5) Wide open throttle switch
6) Lambda switch- fixed frequency valve duty cycle during warmup
7) Lambda system- variable frequency valve duty cycle depending on O2
sensor
8) Hot start relay

pick your favorite 6.

Jim


On Thu, 06 May 2004 20:49:00 +0100 Martin Gutkowski
<webmaster_at_dml_delorean.co.uk> writes:
> Well, what enrichment systems are there (I'm intrigued by Jim's total 
> of 
> six, so let's add 'em up)
> 
> 1) Warm up enrichment - the most basic function of the control 
> pressure 
> regulator
> 2) Cold start valve - extra shot of fuel when the engine's below a 
> certain temperature, controlled by the thermotime switch on the top 
> of 
> the water pump.
> 3) Accelleration enrichment - vacuum fed to the CPR via delay valve 
> lowers control pressure when vacuum is "lost", but only for a few 
> seconds, and only when the engine's cold
> 4) Lambda system enrichment - firstly during warm up, which is not 
> strictly enrichment because it's just waiting for the exhaust sensor 
> to 
> get hot enough. However, this state in a hot engine results in rich 
> running which is why this is used for...
> 5) Full throttle enrichment - effectively puts the lambda ecu into 
> "warm-up" mode.
> 6) Errm. Not sure.
> 

...


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Message: 10
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 21:36:18 -0500
From: DMCVIN6683 <dmcvin6683_at_dml_wi.rr.com>
Subject: Local tire shop

I was looking for a set of used rear tires at a local tire shop and 
they would not even tell me if they had any P235/60HR15 tires unless i 
told them what they were for, i just said "they were for my car" and he 
insisted i tell him what kind of car it was for before he would bother 
to look for them. Anybody ever run into this problem with their car 
before?

I wanted to buy 4 new matching tires next year because i still have 
lots of tread on my fronts.

Mark V



Come see all of my Photo's at my Website's
http://photos.yahoo.com/snextime
http://groups.msn.com/DMCPhotos/shoebox.msnw
http://www.exoticrides.com/galleries/showgallery.php?ppuser=57




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Message: 11
Date: Thu, 6 May 2004 22:15:11 -0400
From: "Aaron Crocco" <Slider_ten_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: DMC Storage

Hey all,

 As I begin the final few months of gearing up for ownership, I will be in
need of a place to store my car.  I live in a co-op so I will need to rent a
garage.  I live on Long Island and I'd like to know what options I have.
How do I go about trying to find a place to store my future purchase?  Any
suggestions are welcome.  Thanks.

-Aaron Crocco
NY Plate:  OUTATYM





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