From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 2007
Date: Sunday, May 09, 2004 9:22 PM

There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Closing your doors from the outside
From: "ryanpwright" <yahoo1_at_dml_ryanwright.com>

2. Re: Lamp cross reference
From: "Dave Sontos" <dsontos_at_dml_verizon.net>

3. Re: glove box bulb?
From: mike.griese_at_dml_worldnet.att.net

4. Re: Re: Delorean automatic pan gasket discussion (long)
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

5. Re: Delorean automatic pan gasket discussion (long)
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

6. Delorean Brakes
From: "Paul" <vrt10whips_at_dml_yahoo.com>

7. Re: New Owner! and inspection questions
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

8. Cylinder issue
From: Enid/Jeremiah <hispanicangeleyes_at_dml_yahoo.com>

9. Manual Transmission Gear Oil
From: "theshovel1224" <theshovel1224_at_dml_yahoo.com>

10. RE: Farrar Hudkins and VIN 980
From: "Farrar Russell Carroll Hudkins" <fhudkins_at_dml_uno.edu>

11. Re: Manual Transmission Gear Oil
From: "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_dmcnews.com>

12. Cooling Fan Fail questions, thanks.
From: "funkstuf" <funkstuf_at_dml_hotmail.com>

13. Re: Cylinder issue
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

14. Re: Cooling Fan Fail questions, thanks.
From: "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_dmcnews.com>

15. Re: Delorean in shed N.Ireland (NEED HELP)
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

16. 1981 vin 5866 8100 miles needs a home.
From: "sammy u" <sldav_at_dml_msn.com>

17. Special Tools _at_dml_ PF?
From: "Stephen Card" <stephen_at_dml_procomroofing.com>

18. Re: New parts don't ALWAYS make your car run better...
From: "dukeofclassiccars" <tswatch_at_dml_mail.com>

19. Re: Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

20. Re: Roof support repair, was Torsion bars removed.
From: "twinenginedmc12" <twinenginedmc12_at_dml_gendreaumicro.com>

21. Re: Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?
From: "Cecil Longwisch" <dmc1982_at_dml_msn.com>

22. engine cover hinges
From: "Cecil Longwisch" <dmc1982_at_dml_msn.com>

23. Engine swaps + street legal = ?
From: "composerphacia" <ComposerZelgadis_at_dml_aol.com>

24. Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

25. Re: 1981 vin 5866 8100 miles needs a home.
From: Louie G <louie_at_dml_delorean.com>





Message: 1
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 15:52:28 -0000
From: "ryanpwright" <yahoo1_at_dml_ryanwright.com>
Subject: Re: Closing your doors from the outside

Of course we figured it out the first time we attempted it. Getting
the door closed wasn't the issue. It was a question of what's the
easiest on the car. I was concerned that pushing on the trim would
eventually cause a problem. Besides, it was a fun little thread. ;)

Anyway, thanks to all who replied.

-Ryan

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Jack Stiefel" <jackstiefel_at_dml_s...> wrote:
> Ditto.  It seems just fine for there to be directions in the
manuals, but
> come on, I am pretty sure most of us figured it out the first time we
> attempted it...otherwise you now have a dead battery and look silly
driving
> down the road with one door flaying away in the breeze lol.
> 
> Jack Stiefel
> www.fmtimemachine.com
> Direct listen link: www.live365.com/stations/radiocape
>  
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Video Bob [mailto:videobob_at_dml_h...] 
> Sent: Saturday, May 08, 2004 12:19 AM
> To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
> Subject: RE: [DML] Re: Closing your doors from the outside
> 
> I usually stand on my head facing away from the car,




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 2
Date: Sun, 9 May 2004 12:14:44 -0400
From: "Dave Sontos" <dsontos_at_dml_verizon.net>
Subject: Re: Lamp cross reference

I have a list here
http://mysite.verizon.net/vze7u0gn/id5.html

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "ramilton" <82delorean_at_dml_earthlink.net>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2004 10:39 AM
Subject: [DML] Lamp cross reference


> Does any one have a cross reference for all of the lamps to an American
bulbs?  I would like to see this in a excel spread sheet just to carry it in
the glove box.
> Also does any one have what the pin function is for the relays .  I assume

>
>
>
>
>




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 3
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 17:25:59 +0000
From: mike.griese_at_dml_worldnet.att.net
Subject: Re: glove box bulb?

So make one!   :-)  

--
Mike



> What I would like to see is a cross refererence for all of the lights for the 
> delorean in an excel spredsheet which shows what the closest Part in the USA.  
> Also the pin fuction of the relays,  such as coil, and normal open and normal 
> closed contacts. 
> Richard Milton
> 82delorean_at_dml_earthlink.net 
> 
> -----Original Message-----
> From: gzapf <gzapf_at_dml_yahoo.com>
> Sent: May 8, 2004 11:15 PM
> To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [DML] glove box bulb?
> 
> Does anyone know what type of bulb goes in the glove box



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 4
Date: Sun, 9 May 2004 13:49:09 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: Delorean automatic pan gasket discussion (long)

In a message dated 5/9/04 10:48:13 AM Central Daylight Time, 
nuttenschleuder_at_dml_yahoo.com writes:


> Dave,
> 
> 
> One important thing I forgot to mention.  Even without
> the rings, just hand tightening it and checking once
> in a while that the pan remains tight. 
> 
> Once someone attempts to torque the pan down to 3-4NM
> without the rings, the lip of the pan becomes bent
> around the screw holes, at that point I imagine the
> pan would have to be replaced as it will no longer
> correctly hold the gasket in place for a good seal.
> 
> 
> jordan

In my work experience, i have never seen a transmission pan gasket that 
needed any kind of rings or spacers.  but then i don't see many Renaults either!

I spoke to a couple of transmission shops about two years ago about their 
thoughts on pan bolt torque procedures.  both technicians said that trying to 
torque the bolts to a certain spec is futile and unnecessary.  they also said 
that rubber gaskets are the worst type and the best to go with are the cork kind. 
 the plastic reusuable ones from GM and Ford are also quite good.  RTV just 
makes a mess and makes things very difficult the next time around.  i don't 
have an Auto DeLorean so i don't know which type of gasket the auto trans has.

to tighten the pan down, first drop it and check for any residual gasket 
material on either the pan surface or the transmission surface.  then check very 
carefully for 'dimples' in the pan.  this is where the bolts have been inserted 
and tightened too much and it made a pan head-like dimple in each pan hole, 
leaving the pan with a little 'rise' at each hole.  the consequences of this is 
that when you try to put the pan back on, it won't seal well and the pan 
could either seep a little bit or have massive leaks as soon as you start adding 
trans fluid, depending on the severity of the dimple and the pan gasket 
material.

to remove the dimples, lay the pan flat on a hard level surface (such as a 
smooth garage floor) with the bottom of the pan facing up (so the mating surface 
is on the floor/table/whatever) and use a ball-peen hammer to carefully tap 
the dimples out. once you are done, take care to wipe any foreign material from 
the pan surface and set the gasket on the pan where it belongs.  if the 
screws fit into the gasket so that they don't fall out after they have been 
inserted, put all the screws into the gasket/pan as they should be.  if not, put the 
pan and gasket up to the transmission and put each screw in, only a few 
threads on each.  don't get close to tightening anything yet.  by now the pan should 
be suspended against the transmission with the screws halfway in.  make sure 
the gasket isn't being folded up or creased.  now grab a speed wrench (best) 
or a ratchet with a 12 inch extension (next best) and start turning on of the 
corner screws.  stop when you feel the slightest resistance by the pan and 
gasket coming together.  now do the corner opposite, then another corner, then 
another corner.  now do one of the side screws that is farthest from the last 
corner.  keep criss-crossing over the pan so that you avoid tightening screws 
closest to each other.  after each screw has been tightened a little, start over 
again applying a little more pressure than before and keep on criss-crossing.  
on the 3rd time around, you should tighten it just as much as it takes to get 
'snug'.  don't turn it until the screw stops or so that you need to use two 
hands on the ratchet, or flex your arm muscles, etc.  it's not supposed to be 
tight-tight.  just SNUG.

now add the proper transmission fluid and amount, warm the transmission up, 
shift through the gears, and add more oil as necessary.  

these are generic procedures for every automatic transmission pan i have ever 
dropped and serviced, only not applying to chrysler vehicles which use RTV.  
i have never had a problem with these procedures or a come-back.  the only 
time the pan still leaks is when the tranmission mating surface is marred, the 
pan is bent, the pan has dimples, the gasket is poor quality, or it has been 
over-tightened.  

i remind you that i have never serviced an auto DeLorean tranny (mine is a 
manual) so perhaps the DMC is one of those odd-balls, but i bet it's not.  

hope this helps you in some way.
Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 5
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 19:09:29 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Delorean automatic pan gasket discussion (long)

With the proper gasket you do not have to tighten very much to seal.
If the pan does bend it is common practice to just beat it flat
against a piece of wood before reinstalling, like the sheet metal
valve covers on American cars. They do tend to bend a little around
the screw holes. It is only sheet metal so it bends easily. You
shouldn't need to replace it unless you run soemthing over and tear
the pan up (very unlikely).
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, jordan rubin <nuttenschleuder_at_dml_y...> wrote:
> Dave,
> 
> 
> One important thing I forgot to mention.  Even without
> the rings, just hand tightening it and checking once
> in a while that the pan remains tight. 
> 
>  Once someone attempts to torque the pan down to 3-4NM
> without the rings, the lip of the pan becomes bent
> around the screw holes, at that point I imagine the
> pan would have to be replaced as it will no longer
> correctly hold the gasket in place for a good seal.
> 
> 
> jordan
> 11613
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> --- David Teitelbaum <jtrealty_at_dml_w...> wrote:
> > You should be fine without any "rings" in the gasket
> > as long as you
> > don't overtighten the pan bolts. Make sure none of
> > the threads are
> > stripped in the housing. Did you fix the gearshift
> > cable leak too? The
> > only way I know of is to do it like Rob Grady does,
> > that is to  slip a
> > piece of heat-shrink tubing over it and melt it
> > down. It seems the
> > cable is porous and allows oil to leak through. As
> > it comes down it
> > looks like a pan gasket leak. You should also
> > replace the "O" ring on
> > the vacuum modulater. If the seals start to leak
> > again soon it could
> > mean your trans is nearing a melt-down because of an
> > overload of fine
> > metal particles eating up the seals. Pull the
> > dipstick and feel the
> > oil with your fingers. If it is dark and feels
> > gritty flush it a
> > couple of times. You could also try a trans shop.
> > Some have a machine
> > that will flush and filter the trans without taking
> > it apart. The
> > reason you saw transmissions RTV'd without a gasket
> > is that a P.O.
> > took the car to a shop for a trans service and the
> > shop didn't have a
> > pan gasket and destroyed the old one when they
> > dropped the pan.
> > David Teitelbaum
> > vin 10757
> > 
> > 
> > --- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, jordan rubin
> > <nuttenschleuder_at_dml_y...> wrote:
> > > All,
> > > 
> > >      I have finally found and repaired the last of
> > the
> > > leaks in my automatic transmission.  This project
> > was
> > > starting to get frustrating as it was done more
> > than
> > > once without a solution to the leaking.  I have
> > spoken
> > > to some of you for more than a year about this
> > topic.
> > > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > To address comments privately to the moderating
> > team, please address:
> > moderators_at_dml_d...
> > 
> > For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for
> > sale see www.dmcnews.com
> > 
> > To search the archives or view files, log in at
> > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> > Yahoo! Groups Links
> > 
> > 
> >      dmcnews-unsubscribe_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
> > 
> >  
> > 
> 
> 
> 
> 	
> 		
> __________________________________
> Do you Yahoo!?
> Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
> http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 6
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 19:11:19 -0000
From: "Paul" <vrt10whips_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Delorean Brakes

Hi all,

I just had a quick question.

I FINALLY drove a delorean for the first time last friday, and I 
noticed that it didnt have power brakes.

Do deloreans have power brakes, or hydrulic brakes?  Any info on 
this would be appreciated.

Thank You,

Paul The Whip Guy
MidWestWhips





________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 7
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 19:19:31 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: New Owner! and inspection questions

If your A/C is flat you probably need more than a shot of gas. Take it
to an A/C shop, it is for the most part an american type A/C system
with a Sanyo compressor. They should want to do the following:
Pressurize the system and find all the leaks.
Repair or replace any parts required to fix the leaks
Drain and refill the compressor with fresh oil
Replace any seals on parts they disassemble
Replace the dryer
Replace the service (Shrader) valve cores.
Inspect and/or replace the orifice tube
Sweep test again for leaks
Evacuate the system to remove the sweep charge, air, and moisture
Fill with refrigerent (preferably R-12)
Performance test the system
If your system is heavily contaminated they may have to replace or
flush it to remove all the contaminants.
What I am saying here is that fixing the A/C can be an expensive and
involved process, not just a quick shot of a little gas. That is if
you want it fixed right and not have it going dead on you every couple
of months.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, AdamRayVaughn_at_dml_a... wrote:
> Hey everyone!  I finally got my first Delorean on Friday!  It is
still so 
> hard to grasp that my dream car is actually sitting in my garage! 
My car is from 
> California, so one of the first things I have to do is get a PA
inspection....
> 
>     First there are a few lights out in the back...(one reverse, one
of the 
> brake lights)  I was planning on replacing all of the lights on the
back of the 
> car just for the hell of it...now I don't mean to sound like an
idiot N 3369
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 8
Date: Sat, 8 May 2004 22:21:22 -0700 (PDT)
From: Enid/Jeremiah <hispanicangeleyes_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Cylinder issue

Ok everyone.  Here is another question as we near PF.

My car runs very well, idles at 950 rpms beautifully. 
Something unusual is happening though - one of my
cylinders sporadically stops firing.  Most of the
time, all six cylinders fire, but roughly every 50
miles or so, cylinder 5 stops firing or fires very
weakly.  I placed an ignition timing gun on the plug,
and when the cylinder gets weak, the flashing strobe
light pattern goes haywire.  This is normally
accompanied with "sputtering" acceleration when moving
from a dead stop - like at a stop sign or traffic
light.  Of course, with one of the cylinders going
nuts, my idling becomes erratic (not to the point of
stalling the car, but the idling doesn't "purr" so to
speak).  Once the car gets moving, all 6 cylinders
fire beautifully again until I get to a dead stop,
then the cylinder goes wack again.  This will happen
for roughly 5 miles or so, and then the problem just
goes away.  All cylinders will fire just fine, and my
acceleration is perfect. 

I have noticed that this problem only occurs before
the cooling fans cycle for the first time.  This never
happens once the cooling fans have cycled a couple
times.  Just to give you a rundown of what's been done
on the car, here:

1. Replaced oil filter 
2. Air filter 
3. Fuel filter 
4. Auto tranny filter 
5. Rotor cap 
6. Rotor distributor 
7. Spark plugs 
8. Spark plug wires 
9. Coil wire 
10. Ignition wires 
11. Alternator belt 
12. A/C belt 
13. Valve cover gaskets 
14. Oxygen sensor 
15. Control pressure regulator 
16. Frequency valve w/ss line 
17. Spinners are off tires 
18. Tranny completely rebuilt - specifically 1st gear,
computer governor, torque converter, and vacuum
modulator 
19. Rewired the otterstat 
20. Fixed the brown starter wires 
21. Cleaned numerous grounds 
22. Rewired the wiring around the microswitch 
23. Cleaned microswitch 
24. Added the SS coolant bottle with new radiator cap 
25. Fixed the idle control motor 
26. Replaced the battery with new MATCHING battery
screws 
27. Fixed numerous, pathetic attempts at wiring in the
electrical system 
28. Added a self-bleeding kit to the cooling system 
29. Replaced the shifter cable 
30. Had numerous sets of keys made and tumblers
reset/cleaned 
31. New Alternator 
32. FanZilla 
33. New transmission mounts 
34. Fixed my turn signals 
35. NO MORE TIRE SPINNERS 
36. Replaced all the fuses 
37. New front rotors 
38. New brake pads on front rotors 
39. Added a "lifetime" air filter 
40. Replaced the air hose directly underneath the
coolant bottle 
41. Replaced some of the hosing on the coolant pipes 
42. New oil pressure sending unit 
43. Got my cargo net up in the storage area.
44. Replaced the fuel pump 
45. Installed a fuel baffle kit 
46. Replaced thermotime switch 
47. Replaced otterstat 
48. Rerouted the otterstat wiring away from the
catalytic converter (the wiring had begun to fuse);
the wires were also carefully cleaned and repaired 
49. Cleaned/tightened the ignition wiring (blue and
white ones, didn't touch the red one) 
50. Multiple adjustments of the idle speed screws
(manual idle) and CO screw
51. Took out and cleaned my fuel injectors
52. Replaced spark plug wires
53. Gave the intake manifold and the 
valves a thorough cleansing/paint job
54. Replaced all 10 coolant hoses
55. Replaced all heater hoses
56. Installed 13 stainless steel fuel lines
57. Installed new heater control valve
58. Replaced or inspecting all vacuum hoses
59. Installed a brand new water pump with all new
hoses, O-rings, water hoses, and clamps
60. Installed a new rack and pinion
61. New adapter cup
62. Lubricated the angle drive (make spedometer work
again)
63. New fuel pump cover
64. Installed new front wheel bearings
65. Installed a whole new electrical relay kit
66. New vacuum control switch
67. New water return hose kit

The dwellmeter readings seem to be accurate, my
ignition timing is almost dead on as well.  I know my
accumulator needs to be changed, but that should in no
way have this effect.  This problem has been around
since before we tore down and rebuilt the motor; I to
be honest am quite puzzled.  The only thing I can
possibly think of is yet again - another electrical
issue.  I am going to take next weekend and clean
EVERY area of the electrical system that I can. 
Anyone got any ideas on this one?

Jeremiah


	
		
__________________________________
Do you Yahoo!?
Win a $20,000 Career Makeover at Yahoo! HotJobs  
http://hotjobs.sweepstakes.yahoo.com/careermakeover 



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 9
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 21:01:32 -0000
From: "theshovel1224" <theshovel1224_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Manual Transmission Gear Oil

Coming up on an oil change and I thought it would probably be a good
idea to drain & refill the transmission as well, so I have a few
questions.  Looking at the Tech Info and Owner's Manuals, the
recommended MT lubricant is an MIL-L-2105C or API 1 GL-5, SAE 75 for
below -10C and SAE 80 for above -10C.  The consensus of the
archives is that a good brand of 90 weight gear oil will work, and
much praise has been given to Redline MTL synthetic.  On the Redline
website (redlineoil.com) it says that MTL behaves like a GL-4 70w80
gear oil. They also have MT90 which is a little thicker, like a GL-4
75w90 gear oil. Redline also has 75w90NS (NS stands for no-slip, for a
non limited-slip differential) which can be used in place of a GL-5
75w90. Here's where the questions come in.

1. If I were to go only on the advice of the 20 year old manuals, the
equivalent Redline oil would be the 75w90NS, but everyone on the DML
who has said they use Redline uses MTL.  Now I know a lot has changed
in gear oil technology in the last 20 years with the introduction of
synthetic oils among many other things, but I just thought I'd throw
that out there.

2. I know with engines, putting a synthetic in an engine that has
always run on regular oils can cause the synthetic to "find" places to
leak out since the molecules are uniform.  My DeLorean has the
characteristic transmission leak (will reseal when it's time to do the
clutch) so will a synthetic make this worse?

Thoughts?


John Yeoman




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 10
Date: Sun, 9 May 2004 16:32:23 -0500
From: "Farrar Russell Carroll Hudkins" <fhudkins_at_dml_uno.edu>
Subject: RE: Farrar Hudkins and VIN 980

Hi Zack,

Yes, I am still here, and not being an owner I don't post much. I
didn't get VIN 980 for a number of reasons, not the least of which was
a lack of money. After that I decided to save up some more cash, wait
until I was making enough money such that I could afford to give a D
the TLC it needs, and continue to absorb the info here on the DML.
Consequently I am looking at getting a D in about a year, if
everything continues to go smoothly. It will be one capable of driving
home and whose problems will be mostly electrical and cosmetic (I am
not a mechanic). It will also probably be a stick shift. And since I
live in New Orleans, the first thing I will do will be replace the
TABs and upgrade the suspension. Heh.

Thanks for checking in.
--Farrar
VIN TBA


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 11
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 22:01:21 -0000
From: "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_dmcnews.com>
Subject: Re: Manual Transmission Gear Oil

I called Redline's engineering department and asked them. Since this 
is a transmission AND an drive axle, it's a compromise. What's best 
for the differential gears may not be best for syncros. At any rate, 
the recommended oil is 75W90-NS. The MTL is probably not good enough 
for the differential, and 75W90 (not NS) would be too "slippery" for 
the syncros to operate properly. 

And yes, my formerly slightly leaky transmission is now more leaky 
due to the thinner oil. 

Before this I was running Valvoline synthetic 85W90. Other than the 
leaking, I can't say that I can tell a difference. They cost about 
the same. 

Dave Swingle

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "theshovel1224" <theshovel1224_at_dml_y...> 
wrote:
> Coming up on an oil change and I thought it would probably be a good
> idea to drain & refill the transmission as well, so I have a few
> questions.  Looking at the Tech Info and Owner's Manuals, the
> recommended MT lubricant is an MIL-L-2105C or API 1 GL-5, SAE 75 for
> below -10C and SAE 80 for above -10C.  The consensus of the
> archives is that a good brand of 90 weight gear oil will work, and
> much praise has been given to Redline MTL synthetic.  On the Redline
> website (redlineoil.com) it says that MTL behaves like a GL-4 70w80
> gear oil. They also have MT90 which is a little thicker, like a GL-4
> 75w90 gear oil. Redline also has 75w90NS (NS stands for no-slip, 
for a
> non limited-slip differential) which can be used in place of a GL-5
> 75w90. Here's where the questions come in.
> 
> 1. If I were to go only on the advice of the 20 year old manuals, 
the
> equivalent Redline oil would be the 75w90NS, but everyone on the DML
> who has said they use Redline uses MTL.  Now I know a lot has 
changed
> in gear oil technology in the last 20 years with the introduction of
> synthetic oils among many other things, but I just thought I'd throw
> that out there.
> 
> 2. I know with engines, putting a synthetic in an engine that has
> always run on regular oils can cause the synthetic to "find" places 
to
> leak out since the molecules are uniform.  My DeLorean has the
> characteristic transmission leak (will reseal when it's time to do 
the
> clutch) so will a synthetic make this worse?
> 
> Thoughts?
> 
> 
> John Yeoman




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 12
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 22:45:23 -0000
From: "funkstuf" <funkstuf_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Cooling Fan Fail questions, thanks.

I realize this is a repeat question, but, please help.
I have the fan fail module from John Hervey in my car.
I also have a new otterstat.  
Recently I have noticed that when my cooling fans kick on, the Fan 
Fail light also turns on.  When I looked this up, the indication was 
that my fans are not working properly if that light turns on.
The light turns on when the fans turn on, and off when the fans turn 
off.  What's the story?
Thanks,

Dale Funk
#4984 




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 13
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 22:50:38 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Cylinder issue

Check the distributer cap and the wire to clyinder #5. You could have
the cap on cocked, the cap could be cracked or carbon-tracked, the
wire could be defective, not snapped on all the way at either end,
maybe you strechted it when you installed it. Also pull the plug and
clen and regap it. It is also possible you don't have the plug
installed correctly, maybe you didn't tighten it or the threads are
crossed or stripped. It could also be cracked. Get a cheap AM radio
and tune it in between stations. If it crackles when the pulg misfires
the voltage is jumping to ground.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Enid/Jeremiah <hispanicangeleyes_at_dml_y...>
wrote:
> Ok everyone.  Here is another question as we near PF.
> 
> My car runs very well, idles at 950 rpms beautifully. 
> Something unusual is happening though - one of my





________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 14
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 23:02:37 -0000
From: "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_dmcnews.com>
Subject: Re: Cooling Fan Fail questions, thanks.

I suggest you give John a call. 

I have a fan setup of my own design (two relays, separate fuses, and 
a simple circuit to detect if either fuse blows) and it works exactly 
as you describe - I like it so I can see when the fans are operating. 
Maybe John's does the same thing. 

Note to all - if you have a problem with something "custom" from a 
vendor, don't be shy about calling the vendor. Its part of customer 
service. 

Dave

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "funkstuf" <funkstuf_at_dml_h...> wrote:
> I realize this is a repeat question, but, please help.
> I have the fan fail module from John Hervey in my car.
> I also have a new otterstat.  
> Recently I have noticed that when my cooling fans kick on, the Fan 
> Fail light also turns on.  When I looked this up, the indication 
was 
> that my fans are not working properly if that light turns on.
> The light turns on when the fans turn on, and off when the fans 
turn 
> off.  What's the story?
> Thanks,
> 
> Dale Funk
> #4984




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 15
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 19:04:06 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Delorean in shed N.Ireland (NEED HELP)

You "could" have a very early car. More important is there a title?
Without a title you will never be able to drive it, register it, or
insure it. That could be why it is such a low mileage car, it was only
driven on the test track, not public roads.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


-- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "alistairmccann" <alistairmccann_at_dml_y...>
wrote:
> OK here goes 
> 
> For starters im new to this site and have been looking for some info 
> on a Delorean I have found in a shed in Lisburn near Dunmurry In 
> N.Ireland. 
> 
> Its a 81' I can tell that as much, as it has the groves in the 
> bonnet/hood, and the petrol cap has a the metal flap cover on it. 
> 
> Now the strange bit..... The car has no vin. number, only a tag on 
> the dash under the windscreen that says (PILOT 25)????? is this on 
> all the cars or is this car in someway a early model? 
> 
> It is in amazing condition with only 1,600 miles on the clock!!! I 
> have had it running and everything seems fine. The owner has no 
> information on the car, he bought it from the auction in 83' and has 
> only driven it a few times and has kept it in a cow shed for the 
> last 10 years without letting it see daylight. He is looking 15,000 
> for it, including spare parts. 
> 
> What I want to know is, is this good value? 
> Is the car special in some way? 
> 
> ANY ADVISE WOULD HELP ME GREATLY!!!




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 16
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 23:17:23 -0000
From: "sammy u" <sldav_at_dml_msn.com>
Subject: 1981 vin 5866 8100 miles needs a home.

HI,

I HAVE BEEN READING DMC NEWS E MAILS FOR THE PAST 6 MONTHS. MY DAD 
GAVE ME VIN 5866 RECENTLY AND I DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. IT 
HAS NEVER BEEN TITLED [ONLY A CERTIFICATE OF ORIGIN] WITH 8100 
MILES. EVERYTHING IS ORIGINAL DOWN TO THE TIRES. IT HAS NOT RAN IN 
12 YEARS SO YOU CAN GUESS THE PROBLEM. GAS WAS LEFT IN THE TANK. SO 
THE FUEL SYSTEM NEEDS RE-DOING. THE DOORS DO NOT STAY UP [NEEDS 
STRUTS] T BARS NEED ADJUSTING]. AFTER READING ALL THE E MAILS, I 
REALIZE THAT IT MIGHT NEED A FEW $K IN RE-WORK. BUT THE S STEEL IS 
FLAWLESS, NOT A SCRATCH AND INTERIOR IS GREAT. THE THING IS, I DO 
NOT HAVE THE TIME NOR INCLINATION TO RESTORE THE CAR. I KNOW SOMEONE 
OUT THERE WOULD LOVE TO HAVE A CLASSY D. MY DILEMMA IS , SHOULD I 
JUST LET IT SIT FOR A FEW MORE YEARS TO APPRECIATE OR SELL AS IS. I 
KNOW THE PRICES ARE NOT THAT GREAT EVEN FOR A RUNNING D. AND I DONT 
NED A RUNNING D AT HOME BECAUSE I NEVER WOULD DRIVE IT. I WANT TO 
FIND A GOOD HOME FOR IT.

I POSTED SOME PICS OF MY VIN 5866 AT DMC NEWS YAHOO.
 



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 17
Date: Mon, 10 May 2004 00:53:11 -0000
From: "Stephen Card" <stephen_at_dml_procomroofing.com>
Subject: Special Tools _at_dml_ PF?

I've enjoyed reading everyones special tools. But sometimes the 
written description in words doesn't do them justice. Would you all 
be willing to bring your favorite / fabricated tools to Pigeon Forge 
so we can all check them out? I am one of those guys who does much 
better seeing something (hands on) that reading about it!
Thanks,
Stephen 
Vin 3601




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 18
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 23:58:51 -0000
From: "dukeofclassiccars" <tswatch_at_dml_mail.com>
Subject: Re: New parts don't ALWAYS make your car run better...

I had the same probalem until just last night.  I replaced 
craked/missing vacuum hoses and the car just wanted to die after a 
few seconds.  I found that my oxygen sensor was bad.  Just something 
else you might want to check.

~Dan

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "supermattthehero" <supermatty_at_dml_p...> 
wrote:
> Dear DMC Troubleshooting Experts,
> 
> Recently I purchased a bunch of parts from the various vendors to 
do 
> a BIG tune-up.  This involved replacing all of the vacuum hoses, 
new 
> ported vacuum switch, cleaning the fuel injectors (ultrasonically), 
> new injectors seals, installing the auto-coolant bleeder, pulling 
> the intake manifold to clean up the 'valley', install new spark 
> plugs, new heater pipe, new MSD Blaster2 ignition coil, new intake 
> manifold o-rings, calibrating the throttle and idle speed switch, 
> and general overall cleaning.  Whew!  So, all of the above has 
> already been done.  
> 
> Let me take a step back for a moment, prior to this, my car was 
> running very well, or so I thought.  Then I started to read the DML 
> more, and started to find little things.  Namely, the three brass 
> screws were all turned open, there was no tamper-plug or plug of 
any 
> kind on my fuel distributor, and there was some sputtering 
> when 'revving' the engine.  Many of the vacuum hoses were dry and 
> cracked.  So, I installed all of the above parts, and closed all 
> three brass screws.  This leads me to where I am today...
> 
> Now that all of these vacuum leaks are taken care of, (or atleast I 
> think they are) my car starts, runs for about 10 seconds, and then 
> when the RPMS begin to settle down it either idles VERY rough or 
> stalls.  The exhaust is awfully foul smelling.  Now I won't lie to 
> you, the gas in the tank is probably 6 months old, and 93 (yes, I 
> know now that it's wrong and I should be using 87) octane.  But 
> anyway, the last interesting tidbit is that, if I take some tape or 
> whatever and put it in where the 'tamper-proof plug' should go, the 
> car will behave the way I just mentioned above, however it will be 
> accompanied by visible black smoke.  Removing the plug makes the 
> black smoke go away.  
> 
> Now, I also have a new oxygen sensor waiting to be installed, but I 
> wanted to wait until I got some fresh gas in the car first, in fear 
> of ruining it.  Call me dumb, but could this be a case where I need 
> to adjust the mixture screw?  
> 
> thanks,
> 
> Matt
> #1604




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 19
Date: Sun, 9 May 2004 21:19:09 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?

In a message dated 5/6/04 5:50:42 PM Central Daylight Time, dmcvegas_at_dml_cox.net 
writes:


> Now as I said before, this method will work on *most* DeLoreans. If 
> your car is lowered in the front, the pitch may force the spoiler to 
> scrape the ground, depending upon how low you decided to go. And if 
> you've got an Automatic Transmission, there is an extra step that 
> you'll need to go thru, in order to get to these bolts.

How about this twist?  I plan on doing my TA bolts in the pit where i work. 
as in, the car drives in and there is a big opening under the car with a 
catwalk underneath in the basement. 

what's my best bet - can i just drive the car in, pull the shields off, and 
remove the bolts?  do they come out easier with the car on a lift and the 
suspension hanging? i have a manual transmission too.  

please advise. i plan on doing this next weekend.

Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 20
Date: Sun, 09 May 2004 21:39:00 -0000
From: "twinenginedmc12" <twinenginedmc12_at_dml_gendreaumicro.com>
Subject: Re: Roof support repair, was Torsion bars removed.

Hi Wilhelm.

Yup, I think working on the car is fun too.  I know how you feel 
about the rusty screws and the rusty edge on the roof support.  I'm 
glad all my rusty fasteners are replaced, and that I repaired the 
roof support.

To remove the roof support, the headliner on the inside of the car 
needs to be removed, as well as the doors.  If you have a good 
headliner, and don't want to replace it, that might be a factor in 
deciding to remove the roof support.

If you decide to remove the roof support, I can offer the following 
experience.  It takes a few days.
The doors are heavy.  They weigh about 60kg.  It takes two people to 
install them, but if you are strong, you can remove them alone, 
though two people is better.

David Teitelbaum's warnings are all good ones.  I won't repeat them, 
but I feel they should be followed.  I would add this warning:  If a 
badly supported door fell closed, and your arm was in the way, I 
think it would break.  If a finger was in the way in a bad place, I 
think it would be cut off.  I made a conscious effort to keep my body 
parts out of the way.


To remove a door, assuming your t panel is off and the torsion bars 
are removed:

Remove the brackets attached to the roof support (the wiring 
harnesses for the doors go through them)
Remove the cover of the hole in the roof support.
Disconnect the connectors.
With the door open, and supported safely, pull the unconnected door 
wiring out of the roof support. 

Before unbolting the hinges, decide where you want to put the doors, 
so you can move them immediately from the car to the storage 
location, to minimize the risk of damage.

Unbolt the hinges, saving the easiest to remove nut on each hinge for 
last. Figure out which nut is easiest as you go.  Before removing the 
last nut on each hinge, lower the door as far as you can so it has 
less far to fall if you lose control of it.  It's helpful to have a 
helper hold the door at this stage.  If your helper is holding onto 
the heavy part of the door while you remove the last hinge nuts, it 
should go smoothly.  If you lose control of the door, remember it's 
only a car door.  Don't do anything risky to catch it.  You can buy a 
new one.  

The hinges may have spacers under them, which set the height of the 
doors when installed.  Keep track of which ones were where.  They 
have to go back there later.  Mine were rusty, and needed to be 
cleaned.  

After the doors are removed and stored away, you can remove the roof 
support.

Inside the car are six 10mm bolts that go through the fiberglass 
underbody into the bottom of the roof support.  Remove them.  There 
may be some pther small screws holding the roof support onto the 
fiberglass underbody, if I remember correctly.  At this point, I 
believe the only thing holding the roof support to the fiberglass 
will be the any parts in the way, sealant, and the wiring.  It should 
be clear how to remove it at this point.  

After I removed my roof support, I took it and the hinges to a 
friend, who sandblasted them to get rid of all the rust.  Then I 
carefully cleaned and repainted them to protect them.  I intend to 
never drive my car in the rain, having seen what it can do.  I feel 
very good about the job I did.  It's a shame no one ever gets to see 
it because it's hidden.



Installation is the reverse of removal.  While I installed each piece 
of the roof support, I put a lot of sealer underneath, between, 
everywhere I thought it might help keep out water.  

When you install the doors, don't tighten all of the nuts just yet.  
Leave them loose enough to move the door around to adjust the fit.  
Are the spacers under the hinges back where they came from?

There is one subtle thing when installing and aligning the doors.  
You may have noticed that the doors have a slightly different shape 
with the torsion bars and struts removed.  That's because the doors 
are so heavy, their weight bends the door a little bit when they are 
held up by the torsion bars.  If you can't seem to get the doors 
perfectly aligned without the torsion bars, this might be why.

Try to align the door as well as you can before installing the 
torsion bars, but remember that you might have to have the torsion 
bars installed to align the doors the last little bit.  I had to do 
this.  Be careful not to smack the torsion bars with tools if you do.
Aligning the doors took me several hours.


About the dents in your torsion bars.  A very smart metallurgist 
recommended to me that I sand down the the dents in my torsion bars.  
The dents concentrate stress, and make it more likely the torsion bar 
will break.  I sanded my torsion bars down just enough to remove my 
dents, which were about .1mm deep.  I made sure to sand a wide area, 
to spread the stress over a longer section of the torsion bar.  Then 
I polished the whole surface with 1600 grit wet sand paper.  I 
figured out that the surface stress on the torsion bars is 96000 psi, 
which is a lot.  It's remarkable to me they even work, let alone work 
over and over again.


Have fun.

Rick Gendreau. 11472





________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 21
Date: Sun, 9 May 2004 21:41:05 -0400
From: "Cecil Longwisch" <dmc1982_at_dml_msn.com>
Subject: Re: Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?

If you have the car on a lift it is easier to get to them however you will most likely need to jack the wheels up to unload the trailing arms and allow removal of the bolts. 

Cecil Longwisch
#10663
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com<mailto:Soma576_at_dml_aol.com> 
  To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com<mailto:dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com> 
  Sent: Sunday, May 09, 2004 9:19 PM
  Subject: Re: [DML] Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?


  In a message dated 5/6/04 5:50:42 PM Central Daylight Time, dmcvegas_at_dml_cox.net<mailto:dmcvegas_at_dml_cox.net> 
  writes:


  > Now as I said before, this method will work on *most* DeLoreans. If 
  > your car is lowered in the front, the pitch may force the spoiler to 
  > scrape the ground, depending upon how low you decided to go. And if 
  > you've got an Automatic Transmission, there is an extra step that 
  > you'll need to go thru, in order to get to these bolts.

  How about this twist?  I plan on doing my TA bolts in the pit where i work. 
  as in, the car drives in and there is a big opening under the car with a 
  catwalk underneath in the basement. 



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 22
Date: Sun, 9 May 2004 21:38:05 -0400
From: "Cecil Longwisch" <dmc1982_at_dml_msn.com>
Subject: engine cover hinges

I remember sometime ago seeing someone who was selling stainless replacement hinges for the engine cover.
Anyone know where these are available?


Cecil Longwisch
#10663

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 23
Date: Mon, 10 May 2004 01:48:32 -0000
From: "composerphacia" <ComposerZelgadis_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Engine swaps + street legal = ?

I hate to sound like a n00b (even if I am one :D), but I just had a 
brief discussion with a friend of mine regarding the street 
legalities of an engine swap.  He says any car with an engine swap is 
just about guaranteed to be illegal in California (for on-road use), 
regardless of how clean the emissions are.

I would like to swap in a Cadillac Northstar, or even a 13B-REW 
rotary in my DeLorean someday.  I live in Florida, so vehicle 
inspections aren't much of an issue.  Still, though... if I ever 
move...  =/

Also, what's the scoop on making JDM engines street-legal in the US?  
I know the Mazda RX-7s are on the US' eligibility list (yes, that 
includes the '95 RX-7s, which many of you already know wasn't 
officially available in the US by Mazda).  Then there's the Nissan 
Skyline.  ;)

Since the RX-7 is on the list, shouldn't the RX-7s engine also be on 
that list?  I find it difficult to believe that I can import an RX-7, 
go through all the modifications and whatnot to make it street legal, 
yet I can't put in a USDM 13B that came out of a '94 RX-7 in a 
DeLorean.  Sounds like crap.  ;)

Please enlighten.  Thanks in advance.




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 24
Date: Mon, 10 May 2004 02:00:20 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Trailing arm bolt procedure w/ jack stands?

To actually remove and replace the T.A.B's you have to remove all
weight from the suspension. After you have replaced them, BEFORE YOU
TORQUE THEM, YOU MUST place the weight of the car on the suspension
that is have the wheels on the ground (like you would over a pit). On
an automatic the extra step is to remove the attach bolts on the left
trailing arm that connects it to the left rear carrier. Don't touch
the brake line, just be careful and move the trailing arm enough to
get the bolt out and back in. Another tip, COUNT THE SHIMS. Write the
# on the frame for each side with magic marker and check the
thicknesses. When you take the bolts out first loosen them and then
rotate the head of the bolt. If the trailing arm moves up and down the
bolt is bent and you may have to slice it up into pieces to get it
out. The bolts could also be frozen into the rubber bushing. In that
case you may wind up destroying the bushing in the process of removing
the bolt.
On the subject of the shields, Rob Grady sells a kit that replaces the
studs. They usually break or spin making it hard to do the shields.
His kit hooks the 3 bolts together and makes it easy.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Soma576_at_dml_a... wrote:
> In a message dated 5/6/04 5:50:42 PM Central Daylight Time,
dmcvegas_at_dml_c... 
> writes:
> 
> 
> > Now as I said before, this method will work on *most* DeLoreans. If 
> > your car is lowered in the front, the pitch may force the spoiler to 
> > scrape the ground, depending upon how low you decided to go. And if 
> > you've got an Automatic Transmission, there is an extra step that 
> > you'll need to go thru, in order to get to these bolts.
> 
> How about this twist?  I plan on doing my TA bolts in the pit where
i work. 
> as in, the car drives in and there is a big opening under the car ]




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 25
Date: Sun, 9 May 2004 18:53:19 -0700 (PDT)
From: Louie G <louie_at_dml_delorean.com>
Subject: Re: 1981 vin 5866 8100 miles needs a home.

I don't think a DeLorean will appreciate at all in non-running condition. I really don't see DeLoreans appreciating by leaps and bounds any time soon either. Maybe by the time they reach 30 years old they'll start to be viewed more as classics and people will start to reconsider them as collectibles who wouldn't normally. But I really think the DeLorean will always be a niche car. They really don't appeal to the masses like Corvettes, Camaros, and Mustangs. Partially because people fear them for their image, and the fact that they're an extinct marque (everyone I talk to asks how in the world I keep it running, where would I find parts for it, and how expensive they must be). All of this misinformation is really the DeLorean's biggest foe. They're also weird little cars that only appeal to a small group of people. Yes they're crowd favorites, but most people don't want to own one.

So to directly address your dilemma, here's your options:

1) Sell the car in it's current condition. You've made it clear you don't want the car, and have no interest in fiddling with it. Someone will buy the car eventually, but I can guarantee you won't like the price you'll get out of it. Even the nicest non-running D won't sell for more than $10k or so. But the good news is it'll go to someone who will appreciate it, and it'll be out of your hair.

2) Get it in running condition and sell it. You'd really have to have a soft spot for DeLoreans to do this. It will likely take you about $15k to get the car in driveable shape. Remember you'll have to completely replace the fuel system. You'll also likely have to completely go through the brake system, clutch system, cooling system, and get the electrics updated so you won't overheat the first time you take it out for a spin. Even if you get it in top running shape, you'll be losing money though. It's hard to say what kind of value the car would have once it's running nicely, but it's still tough to sell a very nice DeLorean for over $20k. There are tons of DeLoreans out there with less than 10k miles. Cars with similar stories to yours come up for sale constantly because people bought the cars and put them away for whatever reason.

If I were you I'd go with option 1. It gets the car out of your hair quickly and painlessly. You'll also get the most money out of it that way too. I know neither really sounds all that appealing, but these are the cards your situation has dealt.

Louie Golden
VIN 5252 Charlotte, NC
 
--- "sammy u" <sldav_at_dml_msn.com> wrote:
HI,

I HAVE BEEN READING DMC NEWS E MAILS FOR THE PAST 6 MONTHS. MY DAD 
GAVE ME VIN 5866 RECENTLY AND I DON'T KNOW WHAT TO DO WITH IT. 



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com

For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see www.dmcnews.com

To search the archives or view files, log in at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Yahoo! Groups Links

<*> To visit your group on the web, go to:
     http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews/

<*> To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
     dmcnews-unsubscribe_at_dml_yahoogroups.com

<*> Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to:
     http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------