From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 2018
Date: Sunday, May 16, 2004 2:32 AM

There are 21 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Coolant self-bleeder antics
From: mike.griese_at_dml_worldnet.att.net

2. Re: cooling problems
From: mike.griese_at_dml_worldnet.att.net

3. Re: quick question
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

4. Re: Coolant self-bleeder antics
From: "ronin5030" <yahoo_at_dml_oneskydojo.com>

5. Running Problem-Rich Mixture
From: "Elvis Nocita" <elvisnocita_at_dml_gmx.de>

6. Re: apologies to Daniel
From: "Daniel F." <delorean_at_dml_ramblerman.com>

7. TAB shim thickness?
From: "Adam 16683" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>

8. Re: ROB GRADY TECH SESSION at Disney Concours May 23
From: "Dan Harris" <whocruiser_at_dml_aol.com>

9. AW: Original locking module: Really that bad?
From: "Elvis Nocita" <elvisnocita_at_dml_gmx.de>

10. Re: Original locking module: Really that bad?
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

11. squeaking front brakes
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

12. oil pressure gauge fluctuations
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

13. Re: Coolant self-bleeder antics
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

14. Re: TAB shim thickness?
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

15. Re: squeaking front brakes
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

16. Re: squeaking front brakes
From: <dsontos_at_dml_verizon.net>

17. Fixing holes in aluminum...
From: doctorDHD_at_dml_aol.com

18. Re: oil pressure gauge fluctuations
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

19. Re: Original locking module: Really that bad?
From: Chris Almy <chris.almy_at_dml_comcast.net>

20. Re: Re: quick question
From: "Lauren" <LPLand_at_dml_earthlink.net>

21. Re: cooling problems
From: "Lauren" <LPLand_at_dml_earthlink.net>





Message: 1
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 03:38:36 +0000
From: mike.griese_at_dml_worldnet.att.net
Subject: Re: Coolant self-bleeder antics

Sounds like you had a bubble in the system.  Once it cleared, 
the self-bleeder was able to work.

--
Mike



> This isn't a problem anymore for me, but I wanted to share my 
> experience installing the coolant self-bleeder and allow you folks 
> to try and make sense of it.  
> After I correctly installed the self-bleeder, I ran my car for 
> awhile, and after 20 minutes I noticed a few things.  The first 
> being that the temperature was 220 degrees, and the fans still had 
> not kicked on.  The other is that my stainless header bottle was 
> cool to the touch.  This I thought was very strange.  I shut it off 
> in fear of overheating.  
> Immediately I went back to the engine compartment, observing my 
> header bottle was cool to the touch, so I twisted it open.  No 
> coolant splashed out at me, but rather I heard a few seconds 
> of "gurgling" noises.  With that, I screwed the cap back on and came 
> back to the car a few hours later.  I started it and let it run, and 
> this time my coolant bottle heated up normally, and my fans kicked 
> on between 160 and 220 as usual.  I have not had the original 
> problem since.  
> 
> So what the heck just happened here?  It seemed as though the 
> coolant had "stopped up" in the engine, but after I opened the 
> header bottle cap, it somehow opened back up again.  
> 
> 
> Matt
> #1604
> 
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see www.dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at 
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> Yahoo! Groups Links
> 
> 
> 
>  
> 



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Message: 2
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 03:34:53 +0000
From: mike.griese_at_dml_worldnet.att.net
Subject: Re: cooling problems

Fix the leaks first - always.  You can't debug cooling 
problems if there is a breach in the system.  The leak
will allow air into the system and cause localized 
hot spots in the upper regions of the block - right
where you don't want them.

There is a difference between an otterstat and a thermostat.
The thermostat controls the flow of coolant in and out
of the block.  It is closed while the engine is cold
to keep the heat in the block.  This helps combustion 
efficiency.  When the block reaches operating temperature,
the thermostat opens, allowing coolant to flow to the
radiator.  You can see this if you watch your temperature
gage.  

The otterstat is a thermal switch.  It closes when it 
senses heat, and opens when it cools off.  This switch
is what controls the fans - when the coolant gets hot
enough, the switch closes, turning on the fans.  When 
the coolant temperature drops, the fans turn off.

--
Mike




> 
> Thanks, Jim.   My guess, based on the last two POs, is that they will 
> need replaced.  Call it a strong hunch.   I bought the car assuming 
> that.
> 
> Speaking of the last POs, you all know Sean, but does anyone know 
> of Adam?  He lived in San Diego and had the car seviced at Garden 
> Grove?  
> 
 next week. 
> 
> I do have another question  - is there a difference between a 
> thermostat and an otterstat?  
> 
> Thanks once again for your collective help.
> 
> .....................LP
> 10440
> 



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Message: 3
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 03:46:57 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: quick question

OK -- This could be a horse of different color altogether:

Did you truly boil the coolant, or was it merely spewing out of the
overflow tube? If it's the latter, you may not have hurt anything but
the environment.

Stock DeLorean does NOT have a coolant overflow bottle, even though
that's what people often call it. It's an expansion tank. It is
located on the pressurized side of the radiator cap. It serves the
same purpose as the air gap at the top of a normal radiator. If your
system has too much coolant, it will fill this tank to the top then
spit excess out that tube. That's the way car companies did it in the
late 70's/early 80's (proper overflow bottles were a dealer option).

What was your gauge reading when this happened? Did the plumbing sound
like Mount Vesuvius? 

All you want to see in the expansion tank (bled system) is a little
puddle at the bottom, basically the same level as the thermostat. 

Change your hoses anyway. You should never trust a PO's rubber.

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Lauren" <LPLand_at_dml_e...> wrote:
>
> Would it be safe to assume that if after the coolant spewed out the 
> overflow and was replaced, the engine purred down the freeway at 
> 90 and normal temperature, that I haven't damaged it? 
> 





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Message: 4
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 03:31:17 -0000
From: "ronin5030" <yahoo_at_dml_oneskydojo.com>
Subject: Re: Coolant self-bleeder antics

I got my kit from Toby at delorean-parts.com and installed it this 
afternoon. Toby also sent me a personal email advising that air may 
not only be trapped at the water pump (what the self-bleeder bypass 
solves) but also at the rad. He suggested loosening the small hose at 
the top right side of the rad to release any air there too. When I 
did there was a little coolant, bubbles and then air! It wasn't much 
but enough to cause an air lock.

When I warmed the engine I could feel the coolant flowing through the 
bypass and the fans kicked in normally a little while later. 

Could it be possible that you still had some air in the rad that 
worked it's way through the bypass after cooling off?

P.S. A big Thanks to Toby for the advice.

Mike Walsh
17084
--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "supermattthehero" <supermatty_at_dml_p...> 
wrote:
> This isn't a problem anymore for me, but I wanted to share my 
> experience installing the coolant self-bleeder and allow you folks 
> to try and make sense of it.  
> After I correctly installed the self-bleeder, I ran my car for 
> awhile, and after 20 minutes I noticed a few things.  The first 
> being that the temperature was 220 degrees, and the fans still had 
> not kicked on.  The other is that my stainless header bottle was 
> cool to the touch.  This I thought was very strange.  I shut it off 
> in fear of overheating.  
> Immediately I went back to the engine compartment, observing my 
> header bottle was cool to the touch, so I twisted it open.  No 
> coolant splashed out at me, but rather I heard a few seconds 
> of "gurgling" noises.  With that, I screwed the cap back on and 
came 
> back to the car a few hours later.  I started it and let it run, 
and 
> this time my coolant bottle heated up normally, and my fans kicked 
> on between 160 and 220 as usual.  I have not had the original 
> problem since.  
> 
> So what the heck just happened here?  It seemed as though the 
> coolant had "stopped up" in the engine, but after I opened the 
> header bottle cap, it somehow opened back up again.  
> 
> 
> Matt
> #1604




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Message: 5
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 07:32:26 +0200
From: "Elvis Nocita" <elvisnocita_at_dml_gmx.de>
Subject: Running Problem-Rich Mixture

Dan,
I don't understand why you don't wanna hook up the idle speed system.
Don't listen to all those horror storys about that system because it
works when the parts are ok. I told you before - check your wiring harness,
maybe there's a broken wire or something.

For your O2 sensor - where and how do you measure the voltage ?
What kind of tools do you use to measure it ?
I know, stupid questions, but I've seen a lot of sh.. done by people
who don't know anything about electricity.
Try to unhook the O2 sensor and measure again. It's possible that the
computer feeds a voltage back because something inside is damaged.
1.8V is really too much, I'm not sure if or how the sensor should
produce that itself. From the theory of how a O2 sensor works it
just can't be it, it must be the computer or your ground where you
measure an offset due to a bad connection.

Please don't start to throw parts out of the car just because you think
they will never work. They do work and most times it's really just a
small and simple problem that needs some investigation.
I heard of so many cars where the new owners pulled out up to 20m (60feet)
of extra wires that a former owner installed because he didn't know
anything about the car or because he thought he was smarter then the
engineers who built and designed it. After pulling them out and setting
everything how it belongs to - everything worked fine.
I know you can do it better, you already put her back to live,
the rest isn't that hard anymore.

Let me know if you need any electrical assistance or a good schematic.

Elvis & 6548



Problem solved!  I just need to cut the air back manually EVERYTIME
when I want to drive her!  I could just fix my idle speed motor
problem (which I'm really trying to avoid because I'm trying
to find a way to work around it so I will never have to use it).
What about my oxygen sensor?  Well, it always reads at 1.8 volts (and
it should be at 0.5 - 0.7 volts).  I can't figure out the answer
to
this one yet (and I know it is simple, I just think my mind is fried
from working on everything else on the car).  If it has a higher
voltage than it should, does that mean it is getting too much oxygen,
or too little?  I played with my CO adjustment screw and my air
valve; nothing would change my reading on the oxygen sensor.  My only
guess is that I have another bad wire somewhere (or ground).


~Dan
VIN# 3817  Born again.




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Message: 6
Date: Fri, 14 May 2004 22:35:24 -0700
From: "Daniel F." <delorean_at_dml_ramblerman.com>
Subject: Re: apologies to Daniel

Hi Lauren,

Apology happily accepted. I wasn't that upset by what you said, probably 
just surprised to see Casa Grande mentioned on a Yahoogroup that deals 
with DeLoreans! Hey, I could mention it to the chamber of commerce, 
maybe they will give me free stuff. :-)  Seriously though, it was really 
cool that you happened to run into those English guys with cameras. 
Publicity for the car can't be a bad thing!

You sound like you would be a great addition to our great club that we 
have here. Recently, a fellow AZ-D member and I started a friendship 
with an original DeLorean owner there in Tucson and along with other 
helpful members of the club have been working on her car helping to get 
it running and back on the road again after being parked for 2 1/2 
years. Saturday the 22nd is the third installment of working on her car 
and having a fun time. I will contact you off of the DML with the 
specific information about Saturday.

Thanks again for the follow up email.

Daniel
VIN 10920   License Plate: NOPAINT

~~~~~~~~~~~~
Lauren wrote:

>Hello Daniel -
>
>>By the way, I live in the city of CASA GRANDE
>>    
>>
>I am so very embarassed by my poor choice of words and offer you 
>my sincerest public apologies. I've been here for 31 years and the 
>Sonoran desert is my  home. I hadn't been in Casa Grande in 20 
>years until yesterday, so what I said was totally unfair. It may be a 
>quirk of my personality, but I tend to find humor in things that 
>surround me, not to diminish them, just to see the ligher side.  Like 
>meeting two English blokes armed with a battery of cameras, 
>driving another exotic, at a combination Dairy Queen/gas station in a 
>small city  and attracting the attention of every passerby.   We 
>actually joked about "take your picture with the Delorean or the 
>Austin for $5".   Particularly after your gracious welcome to the AZ-
>D club, I feel terrible that I may have offended you.   That wasn't my 
>intent at all and I do look forward to meeting you at the gathering on 
>the 22nd -- with or without my coolant-spewing Delorean.
>
>>Glad to hear that another DeLorean has made it's way to Tucson
>>    
>>
>me, too :))  
>
>>an owner who can appreciate it.
>>    
>>
>I've wanted once since 1981!  It may take me several years, but 
>10440 will be a stellar vehicle again.
>
>>planned for Saturday, May 22nd. If you are interested please contact
>>myself or someone else in the AZ-D Club, 
>>    
>>
>please let me know the particulars.  I wouldn't miss it for the world.
>
>Thank you for being so kind, Daniel. I look forward to meeting you.
>
>...................LP
>
>seduced by stainless
>HOT 10440
>  
>


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 7
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 07:31:15 -0000
From: "Adam 16683" <acprice1_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: TAB shim thickness?


What is the thickness of a stock shim? 

thanks, 
adam

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_w...> 
wrote:
> If you are having that much trouble with the left side bolt it is
> probably bent and/or corroded into the sleeve inside the rubber
> bushing. If you do manage to "turn" the bolt you may really be 
ripping
> the sleeve loose inside the rubber. Your remedy may be to cut the 
bolt
> up into pieces and remove the rubber bushing. You may be able to 
press
> out the remaining piece from the sleeve. You might have to replace 
the
> bushing, inspect it carefully after you get done beating on it. A
> Sawzall works OK just try to stay away from the rubber. If you don't
> have a Sawzall (reciprocating saw) you can do it with a hacksaw. It
> just takes a lot longer. In may cases I was able to remove parts
> easily with a pneumatic hammer that I just could not beat off with a
> hammer no matter how hard I tried. Again, before you go wild, count
> and measure the thickness of the shims. Even if you do count and
> measure the shims it is a good idea to get a 4 wheel alignment 
anyway
> when you are done. I recomend an alignment every 20 years or so (Ha 
Ha).
> David Teitelbaum
> vin 10757
> 
> 
> --- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Soma576_at_dml_a... wrote:
> > Group,
> > 
> > Yesterday I finally had the time to change my trailing arm bolts 
to 
> > Toby-TAB's.  I am fortunate enough to have a mechanic's pit with a
> lift at work, so i 
> > had the best of both worlds.  unfortunately, i was only able to do




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Message: 8
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 15:32:11 -0000
From: "Dan Harris" <whocruiser_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: ROB GRADY TECH SESSION at Disney Concours May 23

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "jeff512tr" <cingular512_at_dml_c...> wrote:
> As an added bonus and incentive to bring your Delorean out for the 
> upcoming concours at Disney on May 23, DeLorean expert Rob Grady 
will 
> be holding a free tech session for all DeLorean owners attending 
the 
> event...... 
> Registration deadline has been extended to May 17! We have room for 
8 
> more DeLoreans!
> Jeff Ippoliti
> 20022


I just registered online, so you'll have at least one more there for 
the show.  Mine's definitely NOT a concours quality car, but rather a 
VERY well used daily driver with something well over 150,000 miles on 
her (but showing much less, as the recently replaced angle drive had 
been out for 12 years!)  Nevertheless, she's had a lot of fixing up 
recently to bring her up to probably the best shape she's ever been 
in over the 13 years I've had her, and this will be a good road trip 
and rehearsal for the much longer drive up to Pigeon Forge next 
month!  See you all there...

Dan Harris  VIN # 1662  FL Tag# MY 81DMC

          *****WhoCruiser_at_dml_aol.com is Dan Harris*****
WhoCruiser's Personal Home Page: http://members.aol.com/WhoCruiser
Read about The Sci-Fi Sea Cruise at: http://www.scificruise.com
Purr-use The Cat House at: http://members.aol.com/LookAtMyCatsPage




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Message: 9
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 07:45:21 +0200
From: "Elvis Nocita" <elvisnocita_at_dml_gmx.de>
Subject: AW: Original locking module: Really that bad?


Ryan - check out my description of the module on the tech page of the 
DMCNEWS.

The solenoids do not fail because of age.
They fail because a relay had sticking contacts due to the poor design
of the relay driving circuit. But it's not that bad. Replace the relays
and you're ok for the next years or so. 

And the solenoids won't short right back into the module. When the 
isolation paint of the copper wires inside the solenoids is burned off
due to extreme high current and a long time (probably it takes way more
than the second that it is normally activated) let's say for several 
minutes, then the wires make a short. The current doesn't flow thru
all the windings anymore and therefore the force of the solenoid which
is nothing else than a magnet - is reduced and can't move the parts in 
the door anymore.
By the way - the solenoid can't short the entire circuit as it isn't
directly connected to the control logic. Check the schematic.

Another note - I found a simple and cheap way to prevent the power locks
from locking when one or both door is/are open. I will post this
on the DMCNEWS page soon.

Elvis & 6548


Everyone seems to think the original door lock module is terrible and
will lock you in the car / destroy the solenoids / drain the battery.
My module didn't work correctly when I bought the car, turned out the
driver's lock solenoid was shot & shorting the entire circuit. I
rewound the solenoids, reconnected the lock module, and it all works
great now.

For the fun of it I took the lock module apart. Folks, this is a very
simple circuit. A few wires, couple of diodes and relays, not much
else. What's the problem with the circuit? Are we sure this is a
problem with the locking module and not simply the age of the
solenoids themselves? When they fail, they will short right back into
the lock module and cause problems. Seems to me that rewinding the
solenoids will restore them to new and prevent this problem from ever
occuring.

Is there something I'm missing?

-Ryan




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Message: 10
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 15:48:49 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Original locking module: Really that bad?

The origional locking module IS bad news! It is way under-sized for
the inductive load that it has to handle. It is only a matter of time
before it WILL fail and burn up the door lock solenoids while it locks
you in the car and kills the battery. The best advice is to disconnect
it and either try one of the many types of upgrades (some of which you
have to build) or order a "Plug and Play" Lockzilla. If you can afford
the Lockzilla it can also get you remote lock/unlock which means you
don't wear out your keys and door lock cylinders. It puts you on a
path for the remote launchers and remote trunk release. It is backed
up by the reputation and service of the oldest servicing Delorean
dealer and is a known and time-tested upgrade. I know it is a
shameless plug but I am happy with mine and I know many other owners
that only have good things to say about it. The only negative comments
I have ever heard about the Zilla line of products is that they are
too expensive. The main problem with the origional door lock module is
the relay contacts are way to small for the current and there is no
arc suppression circuitry to disspate the inductive load when the
contacts open. This causes the load to be dissapated in the solenoids
themselves which leads to the breakdown of insulation causing the
shorting of the coils inside. The problem isn't the door solenoids, it
is the locking module.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757 


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "ryanpwright" <yahoo1_at_dml_r...> wrote:
> Everyone seems to think the original door lock module is terrible and
> will lock you in the car / destroy the solenoids / drain the battery.
> My module didn't work correctly when I bought the car, turned out the
> driver's lock solenoid was shot & shorting the entire circuit. I
> rewound the solenoids, reconnected the lock module, and it all works
> great now.
> 
> 




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Message: 11
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 12:06:30 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: squeaking front brakes

List,

my front brakes have been squeaking quite a bit lately when i am stopping.  
what can i do to quiet them down?  the brakes are about 10K miles old, and do 
not look very worn.  there are no grooves in my discs.

Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 12
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 12:05:01 EDT
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: oil pressure gauge fluctuations

List,

Just in the last two days my oil pressure gauge has been doing strange 
things.  I have the new updated sending unit and normally my oil pressure is at 40 
or so at idle, and goes up to 80 when accelerating.  it has been fine since i 
bought the new sender 3 years ago.  now when the car is at idle, the gauge is 
at around 75 and when i am under load it goes up off the scale but not quite 
straight up and down.  i tried removing the wire from the sending unit and 
observed it point straight up, and when i reconnect the wire it goes down to around 
80.  so, i know it's not totally dead.

last night it started doing this, then this morning it was fine until i 
reached operating temperature, then it started acting crazy again.

what's up?
Andy


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 13
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 20:22:40 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Coolant self-bleeder antics

You definately do have to loosen the small hose on the top right side
of the radiator to bleed the radiator. Just be VERY GENTLE  with it.
If you still have the origional radiator with the plastic tank the
nipple is VERY EASY  to break off. I have not installed the "auto
bleeder" kit. I feel if you have a tight system and have it bled
correctly then it is not necessary. Just another hose and connection
that can leak. I have a metal bottle AND a coolant overflow bottle so
there is no air in my cooling system. I do not have to keep the header
bottle 1/2 full to allow for expansion, the overflow goes into the
overflow bottle and when the motor cools off it is drawn back in.
Another bonus is I can check my coolant level at a glance even when hot.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "ronin5030" <yahoo_at_dml_o...> wrote:
> I got my kit from Toby at delorean-parts.com and installed it this 
> afternoon. Toby also sent me a personal email advising that air may 
> not only be trapped at the water pump (what the self-bleeder bypass 





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Message: 14
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 20:40:04 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: TAB shim thickness?

Refer to Workshop Manual K:08:01. Para 9 Note  1 shim=1.1 degree (1/16
inch). The reason I said to measure them also is because sometimes I
see 1/8 inch and 1/32 inch shims. The total # is not so important as
the total amount meaning the outer limit of TOTAL shim is 5x1/16 or
5/16 inch no matter how you get there. In theory you could have 1 shim
of 5/16 inch or 5 shims of 1/16 each. You cannot have 5 5/16 shims. If
you do have any 1/32 shims in the stack they should be placed in
between the 1/16 shims so they don't get crushed on the outside. When
You go to an alignment shop they will use whatever they have on hand.
I have actually seen them pick shims up off the floor from previous
jobs when they need some. Nothing really wrong with that as long as
they fit correctly. The venders can sell you a bunch of shims so when
you go to a shop they can use the "correct" shims. Usually you will
only need 1 or 2. Sometimes it turns out that you remove 1 from 1 side
and add 1 on the other. If the shims you have on your car are all bent
up or are just wrong it is best to replace them.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Adam 16683" <acprice1_at_dml_h...> wrote:
> 
> What is the thickness of a stock shim? 
> 
> thanks, 
> adam
> 





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Message: 15
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 20:48:26 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: squeaking front brakes

The "standard" cure is to "break the glaze" on the rotors with some
sandpaper, roughen up the surface of the pads, install new anti-squeal
(damping) shims, use anti-squeal compound on the backside of the pads,
clean the pins and mounting hardware for the caliper. It could also be
that you do not have the correct brake pads. If the car is not used
often the brakes will squeak for a while when you do drive it. Another
possability is if you do a lot of hard braking and panic stops you
will glaze up the brakes. Refer to L:03:01 para 5.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Soma576_at_dml_a... wrote:
> List,
> 
> my front brakes have been squeaking quite a bit lately when i am
stopping.  
> what can i do to quiet them down?  the brakes are about 10K miles
old, and do 
> not look very worn.  there are no grooves in my discs.
> 
> Andy
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 16
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 17:51:13 -0500
From: <dsontos_at_dml_verizon.net>
Subject: Re: squeaking front brakes

My front brakes used to squeak all the time, very embarrasing. The problem turned out to be a stuck caliper. One piston of my front brake caliper was stuck (there are two in each caliper)resulting in the other piston doing all the work. Once I repaired the piston, no more squeaking.
> 
> From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
> Date: 2004/05/15 Sat AM 11:06:30 CDT
> To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
> Subject: [DML] squeaking front brakes
> 
> List,
> 
> my front brakes have been squeaking quite a bit lately when i am stopping.  
> what can i do to quiet them down?  the brakes are about 10K miles old, and do 
> not look very worn.  there are no grooves in my discs.
> 
> Andy
> 





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Message: 17
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 18:32:18 EDT
From: doctorDHD_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Fixing holes in aluminum...

I was just wondering if you could fix those holes in the top of the engine 
with "ALUMITE".  I found that it does a great job on aluminum and it is very 
easy to work with.  www.alumite.com

and NO I don't have a hole in my block, knock wood (or should that be knock 
aluminum).

Dave & 6530.


"Just Say NO, to the COUCH POTATO!"


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 18
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 20:55:01 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: oil pressure gauge fluctuations

You should get an accurate mechanical gauge and put it in instead of
the sender unit to see what the pressure really is. It could be a
problem with the electric sender, the wiring, or the dash, but first
you should see if the gauge is really telling you the actual pressure.
It is rare but you could have a problem with the motor itself. Do you
have a Perflux oil filter? Have you checked or changed your oil
lately? What kind of oil do you have in the motor?
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Soma576_at_dml_a... wrote:
> List,
> 
> Just in the last two days my oil pressure gauge has been doing strange 
> things.  I have the new updated sending unit and normally my oil 




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Message: 19
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 13:56:07 -0700
From: Chris Almy <chris.almy_at_dml_comcast.net>
Subject: Re: Original locking module: Really that bad?

You might want to check out the tech section as it covers the two major 
issues with the lock module. The first and foremost are the relays. The 
problem is they can't handle the current requirements for the solenoids. 
Over time, they will start to stick and cause the solenoids to burn out. If 
you want to keep the lock module, these relays should be replaced. And to 
prevent them from failing again in the future, add another set of high 
current relays that will actually switch the solenoid current. Don't use 
the high current ones directly with the controller electronics as it will 
change the length of time that it engages the solenoids.

The second problem is the standby power. Over time, it will slowly drain 
your battery. There is an article in the tech section that covers replacing 
a set of transistors and resisters that will dramatically lower the standby 
power. While you are at it, replace the capacitors to insure proper 
solenoid engagement timing (their cheap and available at Radio Shack).

If you are not comfortable with soldering the electronics and wiring 
additional relays, then you would be much better off either disconnecting 
the controller or installing a Lockzilla. Otherwise it should only cost you 
about $40-$50 in parts and a few hours of your time.

Chris
VIN 4099


At 07:05 PM 5/14/2004 +0000, you wrote:
>Everyone seems to think the original door lock module is terrible and
>will lock you in the car / destroy the solenoids / drain the battery.
>My module didn't work correctly when I bought the car, turned out the
>driver's lock solenoid was shot & shorting the entire circuit. I
>rewound the solenoids, reconnected the lock module, and it all works
>great now.
>
>For the fun of it I took the lock module apart. Folks, this is a very
>simple circuit. A few wires, couple of diodes and relays, not much
>else. What's the problem with the circuit? Are we sure this is a
>problem with the locking module and not simply the age of the
>solenoids themselves? When they fail, they will short right back into
>the lock module and cause problems. Seems to me that rewinding the
>solenoids will restore them to new and prevent this problem from ever
>occuring.
>
>Is there something I'm missing?
>
>-Ryan




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Message: 20
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 17:19:50 -0700
From: "Lauren" <LPLand_at_dml_earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: Re: quick question


Bill -

> OK -- This could be a horse of different color altogether:

coolant green, perhaps?
> 
> Did you truly boil the coolant, or was it merely spewing out of the
> overflow tube?

Oh no no no -- I wouldn't have let the engine get to the boiling point.  
It just spewed.

> If it's the latter, you may not have hurt anything but
> the environment.

The environment being the asphalt of Dairy Queen's parking lot.  It 
looked rather colorful amongst the globs of melted old ice cream.
> 
> Stock DeLorean does NOT have a coolant overflow bottle, even though
> that's what people often call it. It's an expansion tank. It is
> located on the pressurized side of the radiator cap. It serves the
> same purpose as the air gap at the top of a normal radiator. If your
> system has too much coolant, it will fill this tank to the top then
> spit excess out that tube. That's the way car companies did it in the
> late 70's/early 80's (proper overflow bottles were a dealer option).

That explains so much!  The tank was filled to capacity.  My 
husband is a lover of old SAABs and he assumed that since that's 
what you do in a SAAB, that's what he should do to help me.  But 
that leads me to more questions.  First -- the tank I'm talking about 
is located in the engine compartment at the high point.  It is 
stainless steel (an upgrade according to Sean) and has a pressure 
cap.  If the inflow and outflow tubes are hindered by the pressure of 
the coolant in the full tank could this cause the spewing and high 
engine temp?  Just trying to look at this logically.  Am I on the right 
track?  There's probably a bad otterstat and I know there's a leak, 
but if I'm right, then filling to tank just compounded the problem.
> 
> What was your gauge reading when this happened? Did the plumbing sound
> like Mount Vesuvius? 

The temp guage was just tickling the underbelly of the red line. It 
sounded fine but smelled like hot coolant.
> 
> Change your hoses anyway. You should never trust a PO's rubber.

Bill -- you nearly cost me my laptop with my almost-spewing-of-drink
 at that comment.  You're funny, dude.

........................LP
10440
let's hope "Live the Dream" doesn't become "Live the Nightmare"




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Message: 21
Date: Sat, 15 May 2004 17:24:37 -0700
From: "Lauren" <LPLand_at_dml_earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: cooling problems

Mike -

> Fix the leaks first - always. 

Absolutely.  And now that you've explained the difference between a 
thermostat and otterstat, I'm thinking the otterstat is bad.  That 
would explain why Sean had to rig a switch to turn the fans on.  

....................LP
10440, the SpewMobile





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