From: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 2225
Date: Monday, September 13, 2004 8:31 PM

There are 25 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Scotch Brite Pads
From: "bbbigray" <bbbigray_at_dml_insightbb.com>

2. Re: Italian CarFest in Grapevine Texas
From: Jim <jpsenft_at_dml_erols.com>

3. Re: Italian CarFest in Grapevine Texas
From: "dmcorlando2003" <SundeQuick_at_dml_aol.com>

4. Shift cable brackets on tranny?
From: "ryanpwright" <yahoo1_at_dml_ryanwright.com>

5. Re: Italian CarFest in Grapevine Texas
From: "dmcorlando2003" <SundeQuick_at_dml_aol.com>

6. Refilling Coolant
From: "jstnrvs" <jreaves_at_dml_optonline.net>

7. Re: DCS 2006 - Rear Sway Bar
From: Bob Brandys <BobB_at_dml_safety-epa.com>

8. Re: Vapor Lock
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>

9. Are you IN the Pigeon Forge VIDEO?
From: "Robert Moseley" <videobob_at_dml_hotmail.com>

10. Re: Steering Rack Enigma?
From: Sean Mulligan <sean_mulligan_at_dml_yahoo.com>

11. Brake lights not working
From: "erikgeerdink" <erikgeerdink_at_dml_yahoo.com>

12. fan fail kit
From: "alistairmccann" <alistairmccann_at_dml_yahoo.com>

13. Re: SIDE STRIPES
From: "dmcorlando2003" <SundeQuick_at_dml_aol.com>

14. Re: automatic transmission problems
From: "Dave" <v-davidj_at_dml_microsoft.com>

15. Re: Refilling Coolant
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

16. Re: Refilling Coolant
From: "Mike Walsh" <yahoo_at_dml_oneskydojo.com>

17. Re: Vapor Lock
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>

18. Re: Brake lights not working
From: "p12c16" <PRC1216_at_dml_aol.com>

19. Re: fan fail kit
From: "Mike" <mike.bosworth_at_dml_btinternet.com>

20. changing to synthetic oil
From: "captain_hydrogen" <captainhydrogen_at_dml_cox.net>

21. X in the hood
From: Sean Mulligan <sean_mulligan_at_dml_yahoo.com>

22. Re: X in the hood
From: Dick Ryan <deloreanbiker_at_dml_yahoo.com>

23. Re: X in the hood
From: Todd Nelson <tan5732_at_dml_rit.edu>

24. Re: Brake lights not working
From: "therealdmcvegas" <dmcvegas_at_dml_cox.net>

25. Re: X in the hood
From: "twinenginedmc12" <twinenginedmc12_at_dml_gendreaumicro.com>





Message: 1
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 05:04:04 -0000
From: "bbbigray" <bbbigray_at_dml_insightbb.com>
Subject: Re: Scotch Brite Pads

Hi EJ.

(Short answer first: I use 3M Finishing Pads--love 'em.  Gave up on 
Scotch Brites some time ago.  Interested to hear other opinions--a 
lot of folks use sandpaper, but that just sounds creepy to me.  Read 
further at own peril.)

Not a dumb question at all.  Ever hear owners and onlookers gripe the 
finish because it gets "dirty-looking" or "dingy" so easily, 
especially on cloudy days?  It's not always because of dirt, and 
there's nothing inherently wrong with brushed stainless.  Your car 
can stay shiny bright for long periods between baths, and IMHO, it 
all has to do with blending technique.

When I first had my car, it gleamed wonderfully, but after using the 
gray Scotch Brite pads that came in the OEM cleaning kit, I noticed 
the finish looked a lot duller.  Hm.

Decided to approach the job as if I were matching panels when 
building kitchen cabinets.  When you do this, you don't just look for 
smoothness and color.  The real trick is one I've not seen in the 
judging criteria for Concours DeLorean--evenness of luminence.  Not 
surprising.  Car guys think in terms of paint, issues like hue and 
focus, but we don't generally work with grained surfaces like really 
first-class wood.  So I tried a different approach.  

Ideally, once again IMHO, when you walk around your car on a cloudy 
day, when the light is diffuse and the most even, all the metal 
should have equal lightness or be equally bright.  The only changes 
should come from reflections and from the contours of the car so it 
shows off the sometimes delicate nuance of the form.  As this car 
doesn't swoop like a drunken Maranello, you really need a first-class 
finish to bring out the subtle beauty of the shape, or it can look 
pretty plain-jane, even after you break your arm shining it.  That's 
because stray bright spots can actually camouflage all the cool 
shapes, and the car doesn't look "shiny."

A few easy steps:  

1) The blending pad.  The OEM DMC pad was, as far as my fingers can 
tell, a gray Scotch Brite.  I had mediocre success with them, and 
they were bad pokey if you had scratches.  Life and looks improved 
markedly when I switched to 3M Finishing Pads, the kind you use for 
woodwork.  Now I use one with a bit more agressive grit, though it's 
been so long since I bought them I'm not sure which one--100s or 
120s, maybe?  Just a tad more tooth than the OEM blenders, whatever 
that is.

In any event, a contractor friend of mine saw my D by the sidewalk 
one day and remarked how shiny it was, and how nice the grain 
looked.  As my buddy is renowned for his woodwork, I took that as 
some validation of technique.  (As it happened, it was parked in 
front of another friend's guitar shop, and they had seen it just the 
day prior, before the rubdown.  Everybody noticed the bright finish, 
even the bookeeper.  Jeez, all that just for an amp cord.)

2)  Blend each panel in its entirety, not in sections.  Had a "pro  
DMC detailer" do my car a few years ago, (it had been scratched in 
several places) and the poor thing came home with blotchy squares all 
over it that flashed like cheap Contac paper when you walked by.  It 
looked positively dour on cloudy days.  I could tell he did each 
panel in sections.

To do it right it takes long strokes, and you'll rock back and forth 
like a parrot on a perch to reach both ends of most of the panels.  
The neighbors will titter.

That said, if you really need to concentrate on a trouble spot, do 
the spot a bit, then blend the whole panel, then do the spot some 
more, then blend, etc.  Otherwise, you can really build yourself a 
chore trying to make the job look like one piece.

On the subject of unified finish, walk around the car and watch the 
light--make sure the luminance matches from panel to panel too.

3)  Make relatively straight strokes, following the factory grain.  
The "pro" that did my car apparently stood in one spot when he did my 
roof, gouging huge stationary arcs in the tops of my doors, and it 
was way ugly in bright sun.  He also followed the curve in the fender 
flares, making my wheel wells look like they had milk mustaches.  
Yikes.  

The straight-stroke technique takes patience and practice when you 
first learn it, so take your time.  You'll catch yourself taking the 
path of least resistance on the fender flares.  The hardest part is 
on the A and B pillars, but those are some of the most showy surfaces 
on the car.

4)  Use fairly light pressure.  If you press too hard, particularly 
on the hood, you'll press the metal onto the composite frame 
underneath, and the finish will be noticeably brighter in those 
spots.  I've seen quite a few D's with big shiny "X's" on the hood.

How hard to push?  Imagine it this way: if your hand was on a puppy 
laying on the floor, and you pressed hard enough to make him yelp, 
you'd probably be pushing too hard.  (No puppies were harmed in the 
making of this post.)  Okay, maybe a big puppy.

5)  When you do this job, run your garden hose on the panel while you 
work, sort of like wet sanding.  It seems to get scratches out 
quicker, it gets the oxide and dirt out of the grain, and washing the 
residue off as you go makes it easy to see the luminance we're 
looking for.  It also makes the neighbors think you're washing your 
car, which they'll commend you for, instead of sanding it, which 
they'll peek at you through the blinds for.

So how stinkin' long does this take?  Last time I decided to 
resuscitate my finish, I did the entire car in a leisurely two hours 
on a nice sunny afternoon--easier than a wash and wax.  Besides, you 
don't do it very often anyway.  But then JZD did want this car to be 
nice to its owners...

Happy sanding.

--Ray
10693 and Counting.

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "EJ Chambers" <marmieej_at_dml_y...> wrote:
> Hello All:
> 
> This may be a stupid question, but for graining the SS panels, can 
you
> use the green scotch brite pads you can buy in any store? What is 
the
> difference between these and the ones the vendors sell?
> 
> Thanks!
> Ej
> 4475




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Message: 2
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 06:00:14 -0400
From: Jim <jpsenft_at_dml_erols.com>
Subject: Re: Italian CarFest in Grapevine Texas


For the longest time, the largest British Car Show on the East Coast 
would not allow a DeLorean to enter....after petitioning for several 
years, they finally relented, but we had to park "behind the Port-a 
Johns".  Even now, most true Brit owners seem to  ignore the DeLoreans 
at a car show.

Jim #5832

>  
>





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Message: 3
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 12:51:15 -0000
From: "dmcorlando2003" <SundeQuick_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: Italian CarFest in Grapevine Texas

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Brent W. Lundgren" <brentlun_at_dml_n...> 
wrote:
 
> I too would have argued the Italian design for an Italian car show, 
after
> all, that's why you see Ford Cobras at british car shows, its a 
British
> design.
> 
> Brent Lundgren
> VIN #17006
> 

However, the problem then becomes in the Italian car show instance, 
why not let VW Sciroccos in the show. They were designed by 
ItalDesign as well.  If it would have been an Italian Designed car 
show then yeah, but otherwise no Delorean.

Michael
VIN #02944




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Message: 4
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 05:12:57 -0000
From: "ryanpwright" <yahoo1_at_dml_ryanwright.com>
Subject: Shift cable brackets on tranny?

Does anyone have pictures of how the shift cable brackets attach to
the transmission on a 5 speed? There are three brackets total. The two
larger ones are mounted with 2 bolts each, and the third is a support
of some kind that's mounted with only 1 bolt. It is obvious that one
of the two shift cables passes through this third support bracket, but
unfortunately for me, I removed it from the transmission last week
when I took it out. Now that I'm putting it back in, I've forgotten
where it goes and exactly how the cable passes through it.

Any advice, or especially pictures or drawings, would be very much
appreciated.

Thank you!





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Message: 5
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 12:54:33 -0000
From: "dmcorlando2003" <SundeQuick_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: Italian CarFest in Grapevine Texas

But the Honda Accord is considered a domestic by the US Government. 
Itis built here for an obviously Japanese COmpany

Michael
VIN #02944

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "therealdmcvegas" <dmcvegas_at_dml_c...> 
wrote:
> The enternal debate continues....
> 
> How you want to look at it is up to you. But technicly, for all 
legal 
> purposes, it is strictly an American car.
> 
> Egineering is obviously British, but so is the assembly of the car, 
> because Northern Ireland is apart of the UK. In the same way that 
we 
> could claim that something made in Puerto Rico is "Hencho en 
U.S.A.". 
> But still, it's an American car, because of it's badge.
> 
> Ok, let me explain. Chrysler is an American company, that happens 
to 
> build certain vehicles in Mexico, and in Canada. But becase the 
cars 
> are badged American, these are considered to be American cars. 
> Engineering heritage can not be used to contest this. Chevrolet 
> Prisms are nothing more than Toyota Corrolas, but we consider them 
> Domestics, because of their badge. Same with the Pontiac 
Firefly/Geo 
> Metro which are actually Suzuki Swifts.
> 
> Plus, this works both ways. Nissans, and Toyotas built in 
Tennessee, 
> and Mississippi and still considered imports, even though they are 
> built by American workers. And a Mazda B series truck is considered 
> Japanese, even though it's just a Ford Ranger!
> 
> To hell with Saturn's claim that they're the first new American car 
> company in the last 50 years. My new American DeLorean was pounding 
> the pavement long before Saturn prototypes were even put to paper!
> 
> To call the DeLorean anything but American, is like claming the 
Yugo 
> GV is an Itallian thoroughbred, because it was designed by 
Giugiaro, 
> and uses a Fiat drivetrain.
> 
> -Robert
> vin 6585 "X"
> 
> 
> 
> --- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Robert Moseley" <videobob_at_dml_h...> 
> wrote:
> > I went to the italian Carfest in Grapevine Texas today,
> > they would not let me put my car in because it is a "Italian" 
only 
> show.
> > Which brings up a good question...
> > What country is our car officially from?




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Message: 6
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 12:42:41 -0000
From: "jstnrvs" <jreaves_at_dml_optonline.net>
Subject: Refilling Coolant

Hello All,

     I need to drain and refill the coolant in my car.  In the past,
I've had this done, but it seems to be a simple enough maintenance and
I plan on doing it myself this season.  I'm just a bit confused as to
how the antifreeze gets refilled in the DeLorean.  Is it through the
overflow bottle?  That doesn't seem right to me, given the distance
between the bottle and radiator, and the length of the hoses/pipes
between the radiator and water pump, but I'm not sure I see another
way to do it, and the workshop manual is not specific.
     The system should be drainable by disconnecting the return hose
at the radiator, if I'm not mistaken.  I don't see how to fill at the
radiator though.  The top driver's side seems to have what looks like
it could have been a fill-point, but the cap seems either pressed or
rusted on on mine.  
     While we're on the topic, does anyone have any opinion or good
experience with any particular antifreeze?  I know it has to be safe
for aluminum motors, and I'm curious what others have used.

Thanks for your help!
Justin Reaves
#3568




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Message: 7
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 08:19:40 -0500
From: Bob Brandys <BobB_at_dml_safety-epa.com>
Subject: Re: DCS 2006 - Rear Sway Bar

We are planning a salom race course at Pheasant Run early in the week.   
 So if you plan to race this low speed handling course you might want to 
start planning your suspension upgrades now.

BOB




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Message: 8
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 16:05:01 -0000
From: "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_carolina.net>
Subject: Re: Vapor Lock

I'm a late comer to this thread...

Isn't vapor lock a suction problem, not a pressure problem (liquid
turning to gas due to lowered evaporation point)? If so, the only
place it could possibly happen on a DeLo is inside the tank, which is
highly unlikely given the cooling effect of all that fuel.

In theory carburetors can vapor lock because their fuel is sucked
through the jets, not forced under pressure. In practice I've never
had it happen to me. But then again I don't live in Denver CO (I
believe altitude also lowers evaporation point).

BTW: My PRV is now carbureted. Drove it all summer, including
cloudless high noon on treeless interstates, with no fuel delivery
problems. 

Bill Robertson
#5939

>--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Dani B" <5n-_at_dml_g...> wrote:
> It is virtually impossible to have vapor lock in this fuel system
> set-up. As far as "heat soak"?- Which African desert are you driving
> your car through and how are you obtaining your heat soak data on
> DeLoreans and Fiats? First of all the intake and block etc are all
> aluminum which
> dissipates heat faster then cast. The pump is in the tank which is
> delivering fuel at temperatures that can be heated much more before
> vapor lock. The intake and Fuel distributor is located too far above
> the engine to get hot enough even if you covered the vents on the
> engine bay cover. It's impossible to get the injector lines hot enough
> as well as the fuel is constantly being injected into the engine, even
> with STEEL lines you don't have vapor lock. We have a pressurized
> system here where fuel is constantly being moved around or sitting
> under pressure, not floats
> and sitting fuel in a carb right on top of an open hot engine! You see
> vapor lock from a hot fuel pump
> where it is mounted to a CAST engine or if you are using a Carb- your
> carb is too hot, stuff like that. I've never heard of vapor lock or
> percolation with an injection system, only carbs. If this was a
> problem, the engine cover would be vented over the distributor and
> etc.     
>  Hard starting can be due to a million different things, put new head
> gaskets on, make sure ALL your components are working, make sure all
> your wires are powering everything they're connected to (It may be
> connected, but is the power flowing
> through the connection?), no vac leaks,
> on and on and on.  If everything is new and maintained then there
> is no
> way you can have problems- and if all else fails, buy a new
> motor, fuel system, or even a giant fan in place of your engine cover
> ;-)...Let us know what happens- Dani B. #5003
> 





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Message: 9
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 09:11:07 -0000
From: "Robert Moseley" <videobob_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Are you IN the Pigeon Forge VIDEO?

If you are, or know the following people,
please contact me or provide me with contact information so that
I may send you a FREE copy of the video for your participation in the
video. If you were personally interviewed by me for the video then
you qualify.

I need the following:

John Hervey
Kyle Franklin
Rich Weissensel
Ron Wester
Fred Dellis
Stephen Wynne
Jeffery Weissman
Bob Gale
Curtis bryant
Don Stegar
Kathryn Delorean
Jim Prentice
Rob Grady
Ken Koncelik

Please contact me off list with this information.

- Videobob
http://www.dfwdmc.com




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Message: 10
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 10:09:30 -0700 (PDT)
From: Sean Mulligan <sean_mulligan_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Steering Rack Enigma?

I'm curious too.  I just installed a new rack last
summer in my D and now it seems the right wheel is
going to fly off at anytime!  Same problem i had with
the old rack.  What's the deal?  I did notice that the
right front side was sitting a little lower than the
left though...any suggestions?

-sean
10054

--- Rustproof <Rustproof_at_dml_comcast.net> wrote:

> I just received a set of steering rack boots from
> England (Thanks Martin!) and will probably install
> them this evening. There's nothing wrong with my
> current rack other than some accidental damage to
> one boot that occurred at a now infamous alignment
> chain shop. I want to make a complete inspection
> while under there.  However, after looking through
> the archives, I found that many racks on many cars
> with EXTREMELY low mileage have become "loose" or
> have exhibited excessive play. How can this be? What
> actually happens to the rack of a car that is used
> so little? Surely the gears are not wearing out by
> themselves. Has anyone actually looked at some of
> these low mile racks to determine the specific cause
> of the failure? Is it something a shim or two might
> fix? Is something deteriorating or shrinking? Should
> there be any play at all in a properly assembled
> unit? 
> Thanks.
> Rustproof 
> Vin 1559
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been
> removed]
> 
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating
> team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for
> sale see www.dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> Yahoo! Groups Links
> 
> 
>     dmcnews-unsubscribe_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
> 
>  
> 
> 


__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around 
http://mail.yahoo.com 



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Message: 11
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 17:46:36 -0000
From: "erikgeerdink" <erikgeerdink_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Brake lights not working

Wow, that was scary.  My wife was driving in back of me and almost 
rear ended me!  Turns out my brake lights don't work.  My reverse, 
and  running lights work fine.  I'm assuming its the brake switch 
near the pedals, but thought I would check and see if it could be 
something else.  I have the updated Grady circuit boards and new 
bulbs.  does the electrical system for the brakes consist of anything 
else?

Erik





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Message: 12
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 14:59:47 -0000
From: "alistairmccann" <alistairmccann_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: fan fail kit

Hi Folks

My engine cooling fans have started acting up.  I noticed that after 
I turned of the ignition that they stayed on and wont turn off.

I had fitted the special T auto fan fail kit a few months back and 
it was working fine up until today.

I took out the kit and fitted in the original relays and the fans 
went off but the temp gage is stuck on the half way point between 
100 and 220...

Is my temp sender or the otterstat broken???

Alistair
doc 404




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Message: 13
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 17:10:56 -0000
From: "dmcorlando2003" <SundeQuick_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: SIDE STRIPES

I just installed my side stripes from my local sign guy.  I took 
Ken's pics of his #2700 and had the stripes reproduced.  It cost me 
about $60.  I did not get the DMC put in the stripe becuase I have 
teh DMC logo below the vents behind the door windows.  Too many DMC 
things if I would have left the ones in the stripe.  

For the price I got a few sets for myself and really don't care if 
they last less than the originals becasue they are cost effective and 
VERY easy to install.

Michael
VIN #02944

In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, service_at_dml_t... wrote:
> 
> Alot of people have asked me to send them information on the 
colored side
> stripes
> My local sign shop misplaced the file with the dimensions
> They have already made a couple of sets for some people
> We are about to remake the file again
> They can be done in almost any color or texture at your local sign 
shop
> 
> ...and with permission from Houston, you could reproduce the logo
> exactly the same way with the gray backing
> 
> As soon as I have the file, I will send it to anybody free of charge
> so they can have it done.
> 
> See Pictures under "Side Stripe factory original" on the DML
> 
> I have these on the car for over a year with no fading or bubbling
> 
> Ken
> #2700




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Message: 14
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 17:48:12 -0000
From: "Dave" <v-davidj_at_dml_microsoft.com>
Subject: Re: automatic transmission problems

Hi Gert...

I ran into a similar problem last week with my car.  Turns out the 
three cables running from the transmission to the diagnostic port 
were turned into a cheese fondue when they came in contact with the 
metal heat shield on the exhaust that runs around the back of the 
engine.  Mmmmm...melted plastic.

Good luck!
Dave


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "gert christensen" <ingegert_at_dml_m...> 
wrote:
> hey group
> 
> After engine swap, today I put it back in the car. Everything 
works fine, except
> the transmission
> reverse is working , parking is ok, neutral is ok, 1st "hold" is 
ok, 2nd "hold"
> is working and shift ok, but drive is total dead (just like 
neutral). Before the
> engine swap, I have never had transmission problems.
> 
> any suggestions ????????
> 
> gert  win 2884
> denmark
> 
> 
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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Message: 15
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 18:56:35 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Refilling Coolant

You put the coolant in at the header bottle. For the first fill, fill
it all the way up. Now put a pressure tester on it and bleed the
radiator and the water pump. Make sure the header bottle never gets
below 1/2 full. Stop if you have to and refill it. When you are done
the header bottle should be at or slightly above the ADD line. Any
nationally branded anti-freeze should be good. Prestone is around the
best. Mix 50/50 with soft water before pouring it in. In any case the
anti-freeze should say on it "Safe for Aluminum". To drain you remove
the hoses at the motor, radiator, and heater. Flsuh with water till it
runs clear. Dispose of used anti-freeze properly. It is TOXIC and
small animals are attracted to it by it's sweet smell. Wipe up any
spilled so you don't have to take your dog to the vet. You aren't
supposed to pour it down the sewer either. Save it for your hazardous
pick-up day or take it to a local gas station.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



-- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "jstnrvs" <jreaves_at_dml_o...> wrote:
> Hello All,
> 
>      I need to drain and refill the coolant in my car.  In the past,
> I've had this done, but it seems to be a simple enough maintenance and
> I plan on doing it myself this season.  I'm just a bit confused as to





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Message: 16
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 19:34:59 -0000
From: "Mike Walsh" <yahoo_at_dml_oneskydojo.com>
Subject: Re: Refilling Coolant

I am sure you will get a number of replies but I thought I would 
share what I did the last time the coolant was changed.

I have a bleeder bypass installed at the water pump which T's into 
the small hose going to the coolant tank. I disconnected that bleeder 
hose (from the T) and ran it into a large container. I started the 
engine and let it warm up. When the thermostat opens, the water pump 
will circulate the coolant till it comes out of that hose! 
Important!!! - make sure you keep adding de-ionized water to the 
coolant tank as the fluid goes down!!!

Once the liquid from the hose was running clear I added between 6 and 
7 litres of antifreeze, waited till the coolant tank was a little 
more than at the recommended fill level, put the hose in the top of 
the coolant tank and shut the engine off. Then re-attached the 
bleeder hose back to the T at the coolant tank.

Make sure you also bleed the small hose at the top of the passenger 
side of the rad. You may want to also install a small valve there,I 
think Toby (www.delorean-parts.com) and Harvey (www.specialtauto.com) 
both have inexpensive kits for that). Be sure to dispose of the 
coolant properly afterward.


- Mike
#17084




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Message: 17
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 19:09:09 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_webspan.net>
Subject: Re: Vapor Lock

Vapor lock (fuel vaporization) can occur under pressure OR vacuum. It
vaporizes easier under vacuum. Did you ever see in science class how
you can boil water at room temperature in a beaker with a vacuum? Fuel
also vaporizes under pressure in cars with carburators. Typically the
fuel pump only pressurizes to 3-5 lbs which isn't much. The fuel pump
gets really hot being attached to the hot motor and the fuel line from
the pump to the carburator goes past the hot motor. With no
recirculation to keep the fuel moving it can get really hot before it
goes into the carburator which itself is very hot and now when the
fuel goes into the float chamber it bubbles like soda pop when the
pressure is released. Tricks involve spacers and insulaters under the
carburator, insulating the fuel line, rerouting away from hot areas,
and adding a pressure relief valve to allow overflow back to the tank
from the carburator. Thankfully on a Delorean the fuel injection
system is relatively immune to vapor lock if everything is set-up and
working properly. Pressure is a relative term, when your pressure
gauge says zero it is not counting 14.7 lbs atmospheric! That is where
a "vacuum" comes from.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757 


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "content22207" <brobertson_at_dml_c...> wrote:
> I'm a late comer to this thread...
> 
> Isn't vapor lock a suction problem, not a pressure problem (liquid
> turning to gas due to lowered evaporation point)? If so, the only
> place it could possibly happen on a DeLo is inside the tank, which is
> highly unlikely given the cooling effect of all that fuel.
> 
> In theory carburetors can vapor lock because their fuel is sucked
> th




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Message: 18
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 20:43:29 -0000
From: "p12c16" <PRC1216_at_dml_aol.com>
Subject: Re: Brake lights not working

Hey Erik,
      The same thing happened to me a few months ago.  Except I smelled smoke and 
melting plastic!  It turned out that on the left side of the driver's side footspace, there is a 
nylon fuse holder with a green wire coming out one end and a brown wire coming out the 
other end.  That whole assembly melted on me, and the hot spring burned a hole in my 
DMCH floormat.  It is a glass style fuse.  I replaced the whole thing with a blade fuse 
holder and a 10 amp fuse from Radio Shack and have had no more issues.  Good luck.  By 
the way...that fuse holder might not exist in your car, I know people who do not have them 
in their '83s.

Patrick
1880




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Message: 19
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 20:20:43 -0000
From: "Mike" <mike.bosworth_at_dml_btinternet.com>
Subject: Re: fan fail kit

Hi Alistair

In any event , If you are still runnig on the  ' old ' otterstat...i 
would really recomend you replace this only 15 or so from your UK 
supplier...not worth your engine overheating because of this

Mike
#2001

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "alistairmccann" 
<alistairmccann_at_dml_y...> wrote:
> Hi Folks
> 
> My engine cooling fans have started acting up.  I noticed that 
after 
> I turned of the ignition that they stayed on and wont turn off.
> 
> I had fitted the special T auto fan fail kit a few months back and 
> it was working fine up until today.
> 
> I took out the kit and fitted in the original relays and the fans 
> went off but the temp gage is stuck on the half way point between 
> 100 and 220...
> 
> Is my temp sender or the otterstat broken???
> 
> Alistair
> doc 404




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Message: 20
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 19:43:10 -0000
From: "captain_hydrogen" <captainhydrogen_at_dml_cox.net>
Subject: changing to synthetic oil

[MODERATOR'S NOTE: The debate on preferred motor oil comes up often and this will not be one of those debates. This is not a question about what the best motor oil is and responses of that form will be dumped as being repetitive with the massive archive we have on oil.]

I will be changing to Mobil 1 Synthetic next weekend and would like 
some opinions or factual information concerning something the guy at 
the auto store said.  I told him that prior to buying my DeLorean, it 
sat dormant for a few years with all fluids present.  He said that 
over time, sediment can gather in the bottom of the oil pan and other 
places and when changing over to synthetic oil, the smaller molecules 
of the synthetic medium can loosen the old sediment and 
cause "chunks" of congealed oil to clog the passage ways.  He 
suggested that I use a motor flush prior to changing oil and pointed 
me to the motor flush section.  He said that anyone will work, but 
pointed to one he had experience with, "Fast Motor Flush, 5-Minute 
Engine Cleaner, by CRC (www.crcindustries.com, part #05336)".  I 
bought two cans because of the amount of oil used in the engine.  If 
I need it, I have it, if I don't need it, I can return it.

The question is, do I need it, or did I buy two cans of "snake oil"?  
Is what the auto store guy said true?  Since I will be changing over 
to synthetic oil, is it possible that not using a motor flush prior 
to the change, can damage my engine?

Looking for answers and clarity.

Thank you,
Ben Ferguson
Arizona DeLorean Club, VIN 10365
American Hydrogen Association
captainhydrogen_at_dml_cox.net




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Message: 21
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 12:22:25 -0700 (PDT)
From: Sean Mulligan <sean_mulligan_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: X in the hood

Does anyone know how to get that unsightly X-crease in
the hood out?  Has anyone had this problem before? 
Any ways of preventing it in the future?

-Sean Mulligan
 vin10054

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Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around 
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Message: 22
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 14:21:00 -0700 (PDT)
From: Dick Ryan <deloreanbiker_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: X in the hood

Not sure there is any way to get it out.

Usual cause is applying too much pressure on the hood
when washing or polishing.  Over time, the "X"
appears.

Dick Ryan
VIN 16867


--- Sean Mulligan <sean_mulligan_at_dml_yahoo.com> wrote:

> 
> Does anyone know how to get that unsightly X-crease
> in
> the hood out?  Has anyone had this problem before? 
> Any ways of preventing it in the future?
> 
> -Sean Mulligan
>  vin10054
> 
> __________________________________________________
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> Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
> protection around 
> http://mail.yahoo.com 
> 
> 
> 
> To address comments privately to the moderating
> team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
> 
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for
> sale see www.dmcnews.com
> 
> To search the archives or view files, log in at
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews 
> Yahoo! Groups Links
> 
> 
>     dmcnews-unsubscribe_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
> 
>  
> 
> 
> 
> 



		
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Message: 23
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 16:59:11 -0400
From: Todd Nelson <tan5732_at_dml_rit.edu>
Subject: Re: X in the hood

Ray typed up a whole page about cleaning the stainless panels with scotch 
pads, one point he made was if you push too hard on the hood while cleaning 
it you can form an X from the supports underneath.  You may want to read his 
email "re: scotch bright pads" was the subject.

good luck
Todd
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Sean Mulligan" <sean_mulligan_at_dml_yahoo.com>
To: <dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Monday, September 13, 2004 3:22 PM
Subject: [DML] X in the hood


>
> Does anyone know how to get that unsightly X-crease in
> the hood out?  Has anyone had this problem before?
> Any ways of preventing it in the future?
>
> -Sean Mulligan
> vin10054
>
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
> http://mail.yahoo.com
>
>
>
> To address comments privately to the moderating team, please address:
> moderators_at_dml_dmcnews.com
>
> For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see 
> www.dmcnews.com
>
> To search the archives or view files, log in at 
> http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
> Yahoo! Groups Links
>
>
>
>
>
>
> 




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________________________________________________________________________


Message: 24
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 20:42:44 -0000
From: "therealdmcvegas" <dmcvegas_at_dml_cox.net>
Subject: Re: Brake lights not working

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "erikgeerdink" <erikgeerdink_at_dml_y...> 
wrote:
> Wow, that was scary.  My wife was driving in back of me and almost 
> rear ended me!  Turns out my brake lights don't work.  My reverse, 
> and  running lights work fine.  I'm assuming its the brake switch 
> near the pedals, but thought I would check and see if it could be 
> something else.  I have the updated Grady circuit boards and new 
> bulbs.  does the electrical system for the brakes consist of 
anything 
> else?
> 
> Erik

Check that brake light switch. It doesn't just bolt into place. It is 
adjustable, so that you can increase, or decrease the travel of the 
brake pedal, before the lights turn on when you press.

If you screwed it all the way down, then the lights won't turn on 
until you almost hit the pedal to the floor. Gently brake by lightly 
pressing the pedal, and the lights will never come one.

-Robert
vin 6585 "X"




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Message: 25
Date: Mon, 13 Sep 2004 21:26:54 -0000
From: "twinenginedmc12" <twinenginedmc12_at_dml_gendreaumicro.com>
Subject: Re: X in the hood

Hi Sean.

It's not possible, as far as I know, to remove that x.  It's very 
easily caused by even light pressure to the hood during surfacing.  
On my car, it shows up better on hot days than cold due to the 
expansion of the metal.

The only way to prevent it is to use only very minimal force while 
surfacing.  I was very gentle with my car, and still managed to cause 
a little bit of it.  It was surprisingly easy to cause this defect.

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, Sean Mulligan <sean_mulligan_at_dml_y...> 
wrote:
> Does anyone know how to get that unsightly X-crease in
> the hood out?  Has anyone had this problem before? 
> Any ways of preventing it in the future?
> 
> -Sean Mulligan
>  vin10054
> 
> __________________________________________________
> Do You Yahoo!?
> Tired of spam?  Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around 
> http://mail.yahoo.com




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