From: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Sent: Wednesday, February 08, 2006 6:36 AM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 3110

There are 13 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Fuel pressure/accumulator question
From: "blackaddertoo" <blackaddertoo_at_dml_yahoo.co.uk>

2. Re: Re: Aluminum core/Plastic tank radiators
From: kKoncelik_at_dml_aol.com

3. Re: Fuel pressure/accumulator question
From: "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_dmcnews.com>

4. Re: Aluminum core/Plastic tank radiators
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_optonline.net>

5. Re: Dark Grey or Light Grey Headliner
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com

6. Re: Dwell meter setting?? More than you might want to know... ? too LONG?
From: doctorDHD_at_dml_aol.com

7. Re: Fuel pressure/accumulator question
From: "valleyrat12" <valleyrat12_at_dml_yahoo.com>

8. Re: someone stole my DeLorean!!!
From: Hank <heskin_at_dml_gmail.com>

9. "The crash of John DeLorean" story.
From: "John Dore" <dmcjohn_at_dml_hotmail.com>

10. Re: Fuel pressure/accumulator question
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_optonline.net>

11. DeLorean Takes #1
From: Bryan Pearce <bryanp_at_dml_pearce-design.com>

12. Re: Re: My first tune up: Making progress, not quite there yet
From: ". ." <klo_at_dml_cidio.net>

13. Hood Wanted
From: "carpenter12740" <mattdcarpenter_at_dml_msn.com>





Message: 1
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 2006 01:27:25 -0000
From: "blackaddertoo" <blackaddertoo_at_dml_yahoo.co.uk>
Subject: Re: Fuel pressure/accumulator question

for the sake of the money, is it not worth changing the accumulator anyway.

i did with mine but did not cure my problems.
at least however i know the job is done and eliminate it from the list.

have you checked the dwell (as i am about to do with mine). clean the lead to and from the coil.
mine are poor and again a problem here could lead to non/poor starting as the lambda ecu needs a coil pulse input.
Also check all of the idle system, motor/diode/ecu and again coil input.
Check the plug at right hand side of rear bulkhead in engine bay (creamy colour).
SpecialTauto have the resistance values.

Regards

steve


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "valleyrat12" <valleyrat12_at_dml_...>
wrote:
>
> If the accumulator is bad and leaking back into the return line
would 
> it take longer for the pump to reach operating pressure?  This
would 
> constitute a fuel leak in the system except for that it does not
vent 
> out of the system correct? 
> 
> Example:
> 
> Assume the accumulator is good and not leaking back into the
return 
> line, if I put a tee in the fuel line right after the fuel pump
and 
> connected a hose to it and ran it back into the fuel tank that
would 
> be the same as having a bad accumulator. This would obviously
cause 
> fuel pressure to be low or the pump would have more difficulty 
> maintaining pressure.
> 
> Are these assumptions correct or misguided?
> 
> Nathan
> 2277
>









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Message: 2
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2006 21:12:37 EST
From: kKoncelik_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Re: Aluminum core/Plastic tank radiators

I have used two different aftermarket radiators, 2 and 3 row and of course the original.
 
I have noticed a bit of a temp difference with the 3 row radiator that I  got from Rob Lately I have been using a lot of the NOS units.  I just put  one in yesterday in a car that the original went 286,000 miles.
 
So far I have not had any problem with any radiator but do watch the 2 row aftermarket ones as some of them don't quite bolt in the same although its close  enough.
 
So I guess this really doesn't answer the question of which is better but I am satisfied with the 3 row or the NOS and will use them as I see fit.  In  a nice car for show definitely the NOS for refurbished cars or daily drivers its  up to you
 
Ken


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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Message: 3
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 2006 03:24:17 -0000
From: "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_dmcnews.com>
Subject: Re: Fuel pressure/accumulator question

Good analysis. 

There are a couple of easy tests for the accumulator - 

Clamp off (vice grips) the one hose that comes off the end of the 
accumulator by itself. This is the low side relief. If it is leaking 
badly internally, this will fix the pressure problem. You will still 
have a hot start issue, but the fuel pump pressure will not be able 
to bleed off back to the tank and should build up quicker. 

An alternative or second test to this is to disconnect this same hose 
from the accumulator, and then clamp it off. Put a short extension 
hose on the accumulator and direct it into a jar. Jump the RPM relay 
to activate the fuel pump. If you get more than a 1/4 cup or so of 
fuel out of the accumulator (you should expect some as it 
compresses), it's leaking internally. 

Dave Swingle


 --- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "valleyrat12" <valleyrat12_at_dml_...> 
wrote:
>
> If the accumulator is bad and leaking back into the return line 
would 
> it take longer for the pump to reach operating pressure?  This 
would 
> constitute a fuel leak in the system except for that it does not 
vent 
> out of the system correct? 
> 
> Example:
> 
> Assume the accumulator is good and not leaking back into the return 
> line, if I put a tee in the fuel line right after the fuel pump and 
> connected a hose to it and ran it back into the fuel tank that 
would 
> be the same as having a bad accumulator. This would obviously cause 
> fuel pressure to be low or the pump would have more difficulty 
> maintaining pressure.
> 
> Are these assumptions correct or misguided?
> 
> Nathan
> 2277
>








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Message: 4
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 2006 03:31:02 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_optonline.net>
Subject: Re: Aluminum core/Plastic tank radiators

The OEM plastic radiators do give you a lot of warning. Most that I
have seen are turning green. A BIG warning sign, it is just difficult
to see it. With the radiator tucked up underneath and the shroud
covering it, it is not easy to get a good look. You have to get the
car up, your head up into the area behind the radiator, a flashlight,
and look at the left side of the radiator inside the shroud. If you
look at the area of the seam between the left tank and the core you
will see green streaks indicating leaking. The corrosion builds up
eventually forcing the tank right off the core! The left side of the
radiator works the hardest, that is where the hottest coolant is
entering. It is also where you would expect it to fail and it does.
Another problem with the origional radiators is that the plastic gets
brittle over time. If you are not gentle (and even if you are) you can
easily break the little nipple off on the top right side. Radiators
were never meant to last 20 years! If you want a reliable driver you
MUST consider replacing the radiator. If it fails you have no other
option except being towed. The radiator can't be replaced on the
roadside and there is no way to "patch" the tank back on. I am not
convinced the all brass radiator is better or worse at exchanging
heat, but I do believe the brass radiator will last longer. Besides,
any NOS plastic radiator is going to be 20 years old. Even if it
hasn't been used in a car it has aged and that can't be good. As far
as not fitting well, that is only a minor installation issue which can
be managed. The bigger problem with replacing the radiator is the
limited access and those tiny screws and nuts you will be breaking! A
question of the day. Do a rough calculation on the force against the
header tank on the radiator with 15 psi. Consider the temperature it
gets to also. You will be amazed at the kind of pressure trying to
blow the tank off! Who wants to trust a 25 year old radiator now?
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_...> wrote:
>
> Since you can't answer I'll ask anyway ;-) - what's your recent 
> experience with the operational life of New-Old-Stock DMC radiators? 
> What's the warranty? I've installed both NOS and aftermarket ones, 
> I'll agree that the NOS ones fit a ton better, (some of the 
> aftermarket ones are amazingly out-of-square, to where I've had to re-
> drill the mounting holes!) but I'm not 100% convinced that they'll 
> last as long as a fresh aftermarket unit just due to the fact that 
>








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Message: 5
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2006 22:37:15 EST
From: Soma576_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Dark Grey or Light Grey Headliner

 
>>>
Hello Nameless Author,
 
My car is 11596 (20 away from yours) and I bet I have the same color  combo 
as you. Like you, I thought the dark headliner was too dark looking so I  got 
the light colored one.  WRONG!!  It's way too light and looks  kinda crazy on 
the car.  I thought it might look neat and custom if I put  it in anyway so I 
did but I nowadays I wish I had returned it and got the right  color the first 
time.  No one else has really noticed though, or at least  no one has said 
anything.
 
SO - if yours is like mine, which I am betting it is, you want the DARK  gray 
headliner.
 
Andy
 
Fargo, ND  
1982 DeLorean DMC12 VIN 11596

-----------
In a message dated 2/7/2006 9:21:56 P.M. Central Standard Time,  
cupsdmc_at_dml_yahoo.com writes:

I have  an 82 Vin 11572 with Black seats & Black Dash. The headliner 
needs  replaced.  I can't tell if it is Dark Grey or Light Grey. The 
dark  grey color on the delorean.com site looks darker and the light 
grey looks  lighter. Does anyone know if Light Grey came with Grey 
Seats? & Dark  Grey with Black Seats? 






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Message: 6
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2006 23:44:13 EST
From: doctorDHD_at_dml_aol.com
Subject: Re: Dwell meter setting?? More than you might want to know... ? too LONG?

 
 
Now, I am getting confused...
 
To quote page 122 of the DMC Technical Information Manual, ...
 
Connect the dwell meter leads to the diagnostic plug.  The positive  dwell 
lead is connected to the lower right corner terminal of the plug as viewed  with 
the plug cover hinge on the right side.  The negative dwell lead is  
connected to the terminal directly above the positive as viewed with the plug  cover 
hinge on the right.  Set the dwell meter to four (4) cylinder  scale.
 
This seems to be correct in terms of what the picture and description is in  
the DeLorean Workshop Manual on page M:03:01 but I seem to remember this did 
not  work for me
 
I haven't  done it for a while so I can't confirm it.
 
Can anyone check  this out for us?
 
D˛ & 6539
Dave Delman


Message: 4
Date: Tue, 07 Feb 2006 12:24:19 -0000
From: "Brandon Shelton" <morpheus34711_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Dwell meter setting?? More than you might want to know... ? too

LONG?

--- In  dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, doctorDHD_at_dml_... wrote:
>

> BTW, Don't  do what I did the first time, which was to connect one
wire of  my  
> dwell meter to the "test point" and ground the other wire. (This  is
how  
> you'd measure dwell on a car with points and is  wrong, wrong, wrong
for  us.)  The 
> other wire actually  connects to another terminal in the  diagnostic
socket 
> which  goes to plus 12 volts and not ground...
>  
> When in doubt,  RTFM (Read The F...ing Manual)
>  
> Dave Delman
> D˛  & 6530

Would you be able to tell us which terminal this wire should  connect
to by chance?  I have been connecting the black ground wire to  ground
when trying to check my dwell, maybe that's why my needle isn't  moving
but is rather still.

Brandon Shelton
#4205
Orlando,  FL.




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





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Message: 7
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 2006 04:50:48 -0000
From: "valleyrat12" <valleyrat12_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Fuel pressure/accumulator question

This answers my question perfectly.  I believe that my accumulator 
is actually hemorrhaging out of the return line. I discovered this 
while I was pumping gas out of my tank (and collecting it at the 
filter) to drain it and clean it out. While the pump was running 
during this procedure the return line would theoretically be cut off 
however I was seeing quite a bit of fuel come out of the return 
line!  I did not think much of it until I noticed that my fuel 
system would take between 10 and 30 seconds to reach full pressure. 
(possibly accounting for my starting problem) One look at the fuel 
flow diagram confirmed my suspicions. 

I will clamp off the accumulator return line and see if my car 
pressures up faster. Thanks for the direct answer!

Nathan
2277

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_...> wrote:
>
> Good analysis. 
> 
> There are a couple of easy tests for the accumulator - 
> 
> Clamp off (vice grips) the one hose that comes off the end of the 
> accumulator by itself. This is the low side relief. If it is 
leaking 
> badly internally, this will fix the pressure problem. You will 
still 
> have a hot start issue, but the fuel pump pressure will not be 
able 
> to bleed off back to the tank and should build up quicker. 
> 
> An alternative or second test to this is to disconnect this same 
hose 
> from the accumulator, and then clamp it off. Put a short extension 
> hose on the accumulator and direct it into a jar. Jump the RPM 
relay 
> to activate the fuel pump. If you get more than a 1/4 cup or so of 
> fuel out of the accumulator (you should expect some as it 
> compresses), it's leaking internally. 
> 
> Dave Swingle
> 









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Message: 8
Date: Wed, 8 Feb 2006 00:37:37 -0500
From: Hank <heskin_at_dml_gmail.com>
Subject: Re: someone stole my DeLorean!!!

I've got an extra Sunstar model (a duplicate gift) new-in-the-box if
you want to replace it. Make an offer.

-Hank
#1619


> So if anyone sees my DeLorean, let me know. It was missing a side  mirror.





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Message: 9
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 2006 10:16:17 -0000
From: "John Dore" <dmcjohn_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: "The crash of John DeLorean" story.

GSN's new weekly documentary
series, ANYTHING TO WIN, will chronicle the up-and-down life of 
automotive
icon John DeLorean Tuesday, February 14 at 9 PM ET/PT.  ANYTHING TO 
WIN: THE
CRASH OF JOHN DELOREAN will feature an interview with DeLorean's 
daughter and
present his story in an hour-long segment that includes his successes 
and
ultimate fall.

Full article:

http://www.prnewswire.com/news/index_mail.shtml?
ACCT=104&STORY=/www/story/02-07-2006/0004276668&EDATE=








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Message: 10
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 2006 05:05:07 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_optonline.net>
Subject: Re: Fuel pressure/accumulator question

A bad accumulator cannot be definatively tested in this way. I had a
car with the classic hot start symptoms. I removed the return hose,
did not see ANY fuel come out and assumed the accumulator was OK.
After chasing the problem around I replaced the accumulator and
corrected the problem. I cut the old one open to make a definative
analysis and discovered the return port to be completly blocked by
bits of the diaphram. I guess you could poke something into the port
to make sure it is clear before testing in this manner, it may make a
difference. The port has a small orifice inside to limit the return
flow so the pump can get up enough pressure to get the motor to run.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757




--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Dave Swingle" <swingle_at_dml_...> wrote:
>
> Good analysis. 
> 
> There are a couple of easy tests for the accumulator - 
> 
> C







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Message: 11
Date: Tue, 7 Feb 2006 23:13:17 -0600
From: Bryan Pearce <bryanp_at_dml_pearce-design.com>
Subject: DeLorean Takes #1

Hello all...

This is just a fun link about the experience I had with my 6 year old  
son.  He wanted to enter the Pinewood Derby this year and make a  
DeLorean.  I helped him create a DeLorean shaped block of wood and he  
did the rest.

http://web.mac.com/bryanpearce/iWeb/Wes%20&%20Ally/Wes%20Pinewood.html

Enjoy and happy motoring.

Bryan Pearce




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Message: 12
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 2006 01:27:38 -0700
From: ". ." <klo_at_dml_cidio.net>
Subject: Re: Re: My first tune up: Making progress, not quite there yet

Mr. Wright:

Do you still have the OEM pipes and muffler?  It doesn't sound like you have the OEM DeLorean pipe and muffler, for it sounds different then the OEM system (unless my 
computer speakers aren't reproducing the sound correctly). 

The recorded sound of the "gurgling and burbling" are the same that I had encountered TWICE with my DeLorean when I had removed the OEM exhaust system and using a 
non-OEM exhaust system.  I was told the possible reasons for these effects are that there are not enough backpressures to the engine.   This effect happens upon 
deceleration that is associated with the raising of the RPM and quickly dropping the RPM.   It also occurs while the engine is in high RPM and the clutch is engaged in a 
lower gear while decelerating; such as using the engine to slowing down the vehicle as in breaking --  As in down shifting with a manual tranny. 

The recorded sounds are similar to my DeLorean when I first had installed a Flowmaster Muffler with custom fabricated pipes some years ago.  Because the Flowmaster 
Muffler is a free flow muffler and the pipes that were used are over sized pipes at two inches in diameter, there not enough backpressure.  I did not like the system’s 
"gurgling and burbling" to which I IMMEDIATELY removed and replaced it with my OEM system.  Once the OEM system was replaced, the symptoms and sounds went away.  

Several years ago, I again, I had replaced the OEM system with the Stainless Steel Exhaust that was offered from England.  Upon installation, the symptoms and the sound 
came right back, for the Stainless Steel System’s muffler has very little resistance in the airflow and the pipes are also two inches in diameter.   I was told that modifying 
the fuel and the ignition systems will help if not relieve the symptoms and all.   I haven't got anyone with the know how or the time to do so, although the several of the 
owners in England has done so with success.   

Mr. David Teitelbaum did graciously helped me in researching and installed a "dashpot," to which it did retarded and lowered the symptoms and the sound, for it is still 
there but not as harsh.  

As per suggestion, I was also able to reduce the symptoms and the sound by using 1 3/4" reducer exhaust pipe bushings to make each of the tail pipe outlets smaller (as 
the OEM) to create backpressure.  This did helped in minimizing the gurgling and burbling effect, but it also impeded some of the pep and extra horsepower that the 
system was designed to do.  So, I removed the bushings and I have been running the system as is -- With all the noise and all -- Gurgling and burbling………

Kayo Ong
#5508
Lic 9D NY



----- Original Message -----
From: Ryan Wright <ryanpwright_at_dml_gmail.com>
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Sent: Mon, 6 Feb 2006 16:47:43 -0800
Subject: Re: [DML] Re: My first tune up: Making progress, not quite there yet

> Hi David,
> 
> On 2/6/06, David Teitelbaum <jtrealty_at_dml_optonline.net> wrote:
> > Hard to tell what you noise is this far away!
> 
> How about if I bring the noise to you?? :)
> http://www.ryanwright.com/tmp/dglug.mp3
> 
> Notes:




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Message: 13
Date: Wed, 08 Feb 2006 04:51:04 -0000
From: "carpenter12740" <mattdcarpenter_at_dml_msn.com>
Subject: Hood Wanted

I'm interested in a grooved hood in excellent condition.  If you have 
one for sale, please post or e-mail me privately - 
mattdcarpenter_at_dml_msn.com

Thanks, 

Matt Carpenter
5586
AZ-D.ORG








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