From: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, March 16, 2006 6:31 AM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: [DML] Digest Number 3156

There are 11 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

1. Re: Doors and idle speed
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_optonline.net>

2. Re: Doors and idle speed
From: Jeremiah Montee <angelito03299_at_dml_yahoo.com>

3. RE: Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!
From: <rob_at_dml_pjgrady.com>

4. Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_optonline.net>

5. Repairing the D for the Michigan get-together
From: "John Rydholm" <ebondefender_at_dml_yahoo.com>

6. Stainless Steel
From: "Matt Carpenter" <mattdcarpenter_at_dml_msn.com>

7. Re: DCS2006 - Chicago Area Road Construction
From: "d_rex_2002" <rich_at_dml_outernet-tech.net>

8. Re: Manual Gearbox Fluid Change
From: "Dave" <vdavidj_at_dml_hotmail.com>

9. Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!
From: "d_rex_2002" <rich_at_dml_outernet-tech.net>

10. Solving Bosch CIS Problems
From: "Travis" <armac_at_dml_rocketmail.com>

11. RE: Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!
From: <rob_at_dml_pjgrady.com>





Message: 1
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 03:43:58 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_optonline.net>
Subject: Re: Doors and idle speed

The whole door linkage adjustment procedure is complicated. The Workshop Manual explains it best. You need to follow the procedure in the order it tells you. Don't take short-cuts or do things out-of-sequence. One thing you have to do before starting is to make sure the anchor pins are adjusted so the door closes without binding on both pins and BOTH front AND rear latches achieve the second locking position. Cleaning and lubricating the latches and the linkage is also a good idea before adjusting.
For the throttle, disassemble, clean, lubricate, and reassemble the throttle spool. Relubricate the cable as per the recall. Check for looseness in the ends of the quadrant link. You can put the spring on the throttle spool into the next, tighter slot to stiffen up the cable but if it is working smoothly and is properly lubricated it shouldn't be necessary.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757



--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "Paul" <willinot_at_dml_...> wrote:
>
> Hi
> 
> Im having problems with the passenger side door in that the central
locking
> switch does not seem to unlatch the front catch so when I try to
open the
> door it only releases the rear.  I have tried adjusting the rods in
the door
> but to no avail.
> 
> The only way I can open the door now is to unlock the door and at
the same
>







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Message: 2
Date: Tue, 14 Mar 2006 23:32:40 -0800 (PST)
From: Jeremiah Montee <angelito03299_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Re: Doors and idle speed

Hey there Paul,

I may be able to help on the idle problem.  If it's idling at 2000 rpms and than coming down by you quick reving the engine, that probably means something mechanical is binding.  Underneath the throttle spool is a rod with a ball-n-socket joint on each end. 
Unhook ONLY the one that goes directly underneath the throttle spool (it'll have a little clip holding the ball joint on - take that off first) and lube it up with some "3-in-1" Oil.  After that, take some WD40 and sprays inside the little holes that go around the throttle spool.  Don't spray the spool itself but spray inside the little square holes that are located around the spool.  From there, you could go back to your black microswitch (the "little spring" you referred to under the air filter) and do this:
http://specialtauto.com/delorean-parts/images/idle-speed-adj.jpg
. Do exactly what the photo says; if you rev the throttle spool (with the engine off doing this obviously), you should be able to hear the switch "click" - just barely being tripped.  Back the top screw off of the microswitch entirely, then SLOWLY turn the screw and check for the "click" by reving the throttle spool.  Once the adjustment screw just barely activates the microswitch, you'll hear a "click". 
Once that happens, turn the screw a half turn more, than tighten the nut down that hold the screw in place.  It should take a 8mm, and have a screwdriver to hold the screw in place or you'll end up turning both the nut and the screw.  

Do all those things, and shout an update to us.  My car was doing exactly the same thing after a recent tuneup (plug wires), and I did everything I listed and now my car hums nicely at roughly 1050 rpm (auto tranny).  With our cars, you pretty much have to re-tune the car if you do a tuneup due to the mechanical nature of just about every system involved in the running of the engine.

Jeremiah



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Message: 3
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 10:37:28 -0500
From: <rob_at_dml_pjgrady.com>
Subject: RE: Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!

Toby,

Another point you might consider Toby is to have some harder spacer washers
made and supply them with your kit as you may not be aware of how soft they
are. When I last checked a few years ago as I recall their hardness is about
22 C-scale. As I'm sure you do know that is basically cold rolled un-heat
treated steel which is pretty soft. I have long suspected the washers, after
the mandatory double-nut technique the factory omitted, as the primary
culprit in the loosening of the pivot bolts. A check with a prominent washer
manufacturer about the economics of their making proved insufficient to
justify. As the Toby TAB guru you are in a better position to reach a
break-even point faster than my shop but if you and the major venders were
interested I could pull the trigger on it or leave it to you to supply
them...any thoughts?

Rob Grady,

P.J.Grady Inc.

-----Original Message-----
From: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com [mailto:dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
Toby Peterson
Sent: Sunday, March 12, 2006 5:29 PM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: [DML] Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!

Nathan - There are a couple of points that I would like to make 
here.  In addition to the causes noted by David in this post, 
another possible contributor to the joint loosening up is wear on 
the large flat washers that are part of this installation.  I have 
seen many of them that had substantial wear.  This wear is started 
by one of the other causes - mostly by bolt stretch - and once the 
joint is slightly loose, the movement will quickly wear the 
washers.  Make sure to flip the washers to offer a fresh wear 
surface when the bolts are replaced.  The washers will eventually 
need replacement.  Second point - DO NOT allow the alignment shop to 
use aftermarket thin shims for the alignment.  They always want to 
get the alignment exact, but the thin shims I have seen often will 
crush down and drop out, which starts the whole process over again.  
You will notice that the DeLorean spec shime are thick and hard - 
this is a good thing in a clamped dynamic joint.  If you can't get 
them to use DMC shims only, at least insist that the thins shims be 
installed in the middle of the stack, so that the DMC shims are in 
contact with the trailing arm and the bushing sleeve.

If you let us know, we can have a set of TOBY-TAB's sent to Garden 
Grove for your car.

Toby Peterson  VIN 2248 "Winged1"
DeLorean Parts Northwest, LLC
www.delorean-parts.com  

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_...> 
wrote:
>
> If the shims are missing it would indicate either there never were 
any
> shims, the bolt is bent, or the bolt loosend up either because the
> shims were crushed, the bushing spacer was crushed, the bolt 
strechted or bent, or the nuts loosened up. In any case you should 
replace the bolts and get a 4 wheel alignment. After the alignment 
you should record the # of shims with a magic marker on the frame 
and in a logbook you should be keeping on the car. If the bolt is 
bent or loose it is very dangerous to continue driving on it. There 
is no set # of shims. It varies from car to car. There is a limit on 
them though. You are not supposed to exceed 5 shims per side. Take 
the alignment specs with you to the alignment shop. He can enter 
them manually into his machine to do the car. Most shops will not 
have the Delorean specs in their database.









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Message: 4
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 18:01:45 -0000
From: "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_optonline.net>
Subject: Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!

The hardness of the shims is also a problem. Another problem is the
spacer inside the bushing. It can collapse especially if you
overtorque the TAB. The whole set-up is a problematic area. It is not
compliant enough as the trailing arm  moves up and down and tries to
twist the joint in another plane. The ultimate would be to design a
retro-fit Heim Joint in there. It could take the bending stresses off
of the TAB. I believe it is the bending stresses that are the real
culprit. Bending the bolt back and forth under the tensile stress is
what is really stretching  the bolt. Do that for a while and we see
what the result is. The "trick" is to tighten the TAB enough to put it
under enough stress so that the stress from it's induced loads  cannot
exceed the tensile stress from  torqueing it. The problem is if you
are not careful you can ovetorque it and collapse the spacer inside
the bushing. A fine line. That's why I think the Heim Joint is the way
to go, not further trying to Band-Aid the TAB joint. Sometimes you
have to look at the big picture, trying to improve the origional joint
may seem like the easy way to go but it cannot solve the bending loads.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757 




--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, <rob_at_dml_...> wrote:
>
> Toby,
> 
> Another point you might consider Toby is to have some harder spacer
washers
> made and supply them with your kit as you may not be aware of how
soft they
> are. When I last checked a few years ago as I recall their hardness
is about
> 22 C-scale. As I'm sure you do know that is basically cold rolled u







________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 5
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 18:27:35 -0000
From: "John Rydholm" <ebondefender_at_dml_yahoo.com>
Subject: Repairing the D for the Michigan get-together

I'm having fun. My radiator recently gave out and dumped nuclear green
goo all over my mechanic's garage. He was trying to be very careful
not to wreck my R-12 a/c system while removing the core. I'm most
likely getting the good heavy-duty brass one instead of NOS. I also
have to get a new passenger side window motor as the one I had rebuilt
last year is rebreaking (That's a new word there "rebreaking") not to
mention the switch in the car is giving out. I have to hand it to DMC
though, that radiator is almost as old as I am -sans 2 years- and the
plastic lasted this long. Thankfully I don't need new glass for the
window. Other than that, I had to have my weather stripping and my
hood logo glued back on. Just to make the thing look passable of
course. But what really gripes me is that someone keyed my car and
made a nice little rusty streak on the rear left quarter panel. Grr.
Some people have no respect for people's stuff. Shouldn't be too hard
to rub/polish out I hope. Well I sincerely wish that everyone else's
cars are doing a little better/cheaper than mine. I think parts and
labor are going to come to about $700+ or so for me...good thing I did
my taxes! ;) Ah, well, we all love our D's right?
-Johnny
#10715 Romeo, MI
Grey Interior with ripped up seats, cracked dash and carpet cover,
5-speed with a torn up boot, non-matching black floormats, wonderful
J. Hervey fuel parts, Alpine CD+R/RW player, and fuzzy dice.








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________________________________________________________________________


Message: 6
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 18:34:00 -0000
From: "Matt Carpenter" <mattdcarpenter_at_dml_msn.com>
Subject: Stainless Steel

Out of curiosity, can anyone advise which gauge the stainless steel is 
on the DeLorean hood?  Also, does anyone know the composition (% 
chrome, % nickel, etc.) of the stainless on the Delorean?
Thanks, 
Matt Carpenter
5586
AZ-D







________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 7
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 19:42:56 -0000
From: "d_rex_2002" <rich_at_dml_outernet-tech.net>
Subject: Re: DCS2006 - Chicago Area Road Construction

With 3 months left until DCS 2006 and the DeLorean 25th Anniversary
events, some people are starting to plan their routes to Chicago.
Please keep in mind that there is some major road reconstruction
going on near Chicago that should be avoided, if at all possible.

More details at: http://www.danryanexpressway.com/

Starting April 1st (no fooling), the Dan Ryan expressway (I-94) will
be under MAJOR reconstruction for the next two years.  The good news
is that this should not impact most direct routes from Indiana, Ohio
and all points East, as long as you do not travel directly into the
downtown area of Chicago from the any point North of I-80.  Most of
the traffic will take I-294 North to avoid this reconstruction, but
keep in mind this will have much of the redirected Dan Ryan traffic,
so you may want to take another "less traveled" alternate.

If you need a specific re-route recommendation, especially for those
of you transporting your DeLoreans in big, enclosed trailers who much
rather take less congested routes, even if they are a few miles out
of the way.  Re-routes further from Chicago will have less traffic.

NOTE: New speed enforcement photo vans are placed throughout some IL
construction zones and the mailed speeding tickets can be expensive.

If you would like a re-route recommendation that is not listed on the
website above, email me: Rich [at] dmcnews.com

Later,
Rich W.








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Message: 8
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 20:51:54 -0000
From: "Dave" <vdavidj_at_dml_hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: Manual Gearbox Fluid Change

If you want to learn about oil, gear oil, etc., www.bobistheoilguy.com
is a great website for learning about these things.  If anything, the
tests they do on oil is great entertainment.

Enjoy!
Dave Jacobs


--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "rickmichaels" <rickmichaels_at_dml_...> wrote:
>
> I am planning on changing my Manual Gearbox fluid, just because I'm
> not sure about the last time it was done.  I picked up some Valvoline
> 75W-90 Gear Oil.  Would this be a safe weight and correct product for
> the gearbox?  Any other recommendations?  The warm weather is coming
> and  I can't wait to get her out of hibernation!
> 
> Rick
> 0802
> Ferndale, MI
>









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Message: 9
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 21:04:58 -0000
From: "d_rex_2002" <rich_at_dml_outernet-tech.net>
Subject: Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!

Sounds like a job for Pearce Design Components.

http://www.pearce-design.com/PFImprovements.html

Later,
Rich W.

--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, "David Teitelbaum" <jtrealty_at_dml_...> 
wrote:
>
> The hardness of the shims is also a problem. Another problem is the
> spacer inside the bushing. It can collapse especially if you
> overtorque the TAB. The whole set-up is a problematic area. It is not
> compliant enough as the trailing arm  moves up and down and tries to
> twist the joint in another plane. The ultimate would be to design a
> retro-fit Heim Joint in there. 
>
> snip <







________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 10
Date: Thu, 16 Mar 2006 00:04:16 -0000
From: "Travis" <armac_at_dml_rocketmail.com>
Subject: Solving Bosch CIS Problems

I have never seen this book come up on the DML nor can I find it in 
the past post. The book is called Sloving Bosch Continuous Injection 
System (CIS) Problems by James Weber. This is great book that I have 
found that helped me with the understanding, solving, testing, and 
repair/adjustments of the CIS system. If you want to learn and repair 
the fuel system on your Delorean than this book is for you. Check it 
out at Pelicanparts.com part number PEL-BK-BFI-3. Good book to have in 
the garage.







________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________


Message: 11
Date: Wed, 15 Mar 2006 19:18:00 -0500
From: <rob_at_dml_pjgrady.com>
Subject: RE: Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!

David,

If money was no object and you're willing to live with a harsher ride via an
all metal Heim joint as per race car practice then you might consider it. It
would probably require completely redesigned trailing arms (ala Pierce
Design but stock frame compatible)and be rather cost prohibitive. I think an
incremental approach by double-nut retention, stronger bolts, washers, and
perhaps even bushings (also expensive) would suffice. The first three items
combined with careful installation and torqueing would eliminate the vast
majority of failures at a much more reasonable cost compared to custom
(bespoke as they'd say in the U.K.) designed trailing arms.

Rob Grady,

P.J.Grady Inc.

-----Original Message-----
From: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com [mailto:dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
David Teitelbaum
Sent: Wednesday, March 15, 2006 1:02 PM
To: dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com
Subject: [DML] Re: Checked my TABs.... AARG!!

The hardness of the shims is also a problem. Another problem is the
spacer inside the bushing. It can collapse especially if you
overtorque the TAB. The whole set-up is a problematic area. It is not
compliant enough as the trailing arm  moves up and down and tries to
twist the joint in another plane. The ultimate would be to design a
retro-fit Heim Joint in there. It could take the bending stresses off
of the TAB. I believe it is the bending stresses that are the real
culprit. Bending the bolt back and forth under the tensile stress is
what is really stretching  the bolt. Do that for a while and we see
what the result is. The "trick" is to tighten the TAB enough to put it
under enough stress so that the stress from it's induced loads  cannot
exceed the tensile stress from  torqueing it. The problem is if you
are not careful you can ovetorque it and collapse the spacer inside
the bushing. A fine line. That's why I think the Heim Joint is the way
to go, not further trying to Band-Aid the TAB joint. Sometimes you
have to look at the big picture, trying to improve the origional joint
may seem like the easy way to go but it cannot solve the bending loads.
David Teitelbaum
vin 10757 




--- In dmcnews_at_dml_yahoogroups.com, <rob_at_dml_...> wrote:
>
> Toby,
> 
> Another point you might consider Toby is to have some harder spacer
washers
> made and supply them with your kit as you may not be aware of how
soft they
> are. When I last checked a few years ago as I recall their hardness
is about
> 22 C-scale. As I'm sure you do know that is basically cold rolled u







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For more info on the list, tech articles, cars for sale see www.dmcnews.com

To search the archives or view files, log in at
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Yahoo! Groups Links



 



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Checked by AVG Free Edition.
Version: 7.1.375 / Virus Database: 268.2.3/281 - Release Date: 3/14/2006
 

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________________________________________________________________________


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To search the archives or view files, log in at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/dmcnews
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